Working With Event/party Planners

Business By Bunnyb2005 Updated 11 Apr 2015 , 11:19pm by Magic Mouthfuls

Bunnyb2005 Posted 11 Apr 2015 , 12:58pm
post #1 of 8

Have any of you worked with a party planner to sell your cakes? What percentage do they usually take? Thanks!

7 replies
-K8memphis Posted 11 Apr 2015 , 1:52pm
post #2 of 8

zero per cent -- 

AAtKT Posted 11 Apr 2015 , 2:58pm
post #3 of 8


Party Planners (at least the reputable ones) are paid by the person who hired them...

They then direct the people to you because they either like your work or like you...

If they are asking for a percentage of your profit, ask them why they want it? Ask them if they will give you a percentage of their profits?  



-K8memphis Posted 11 Apr 2015 , 3:00pm
post #4 of 8


Quote by @AAtKT on 54 seconds ago

 Ask them if they will give you a percentage of their profits?  


brilliant -- and funny -- made me laugh

ConnieCakes14 Posted 11 Apr 2015 , 9:29pm
post #5 of 8

I work with one, we don't share each other's profits. It's more like we refer each other's businesses to our clients. Like, if someone wants to order a Frozen cake from me, I mention the party planner business who does Frozen themed parties that includes a real princess. She advertises my business on her site, and I do the same. 

ConnieCakes14 Posted 11 Apr 2015 , 9:29pm
post #6 of 8

I work with one, we don't share each other's profits. It's more like we refer each other's businesses to our clients. Like, if someone wants to order a Frozen cake from me, I mention the party planner business who does Frozen themed parties that includes a real princess. She advertises my business on her site, and I do the same. 

BakerBlackCat Posted 11 Apr 2015 , 11:14pm
post #7 of 8

Like @ConnieCakes14, I have a mutual referral set-up with a wedding/event planner.  If someone asks her about a cake, she hands them my business card.  If someone asks me about a wedding planner, I hand them her business card.  And that's where the set-up ends; no fees, no profit sharing, no headaches.

Magic Mouthfuls Posted 11 Apr 2015 , 11:19pm
post #8 of 8

I worked as a Wedding Planner for an event business a few years ago.  We had arrangements with all our suppliers - cake, florist, celebrants etc etc.  for a commission 10-20%.  Generally, the wedding planner puts a package together and the bride/groom pays one invoice.  The wedding planner then uses that money to pay all the suppliers and themselves.  


In some instances, the supplier (cake or florist) would tell us $100 for chosen product, and we would write in $120 into the package price for the bride (pay supplier $100, keep $20 for the effort).  Sometimes, the price was quoted by the supplier as $100 and then the invoice would say $100 - less 20% commission = $80.   It all depended on the arrangement between planner and supplier.


Technically, the planner is the only person the supplier has contact with, the supplier does not deal with the bride/groom at all.  Believe me, the commission is totally earned.


It is no different to your trades, the mechanic/electrician/plumber/carpenter may say $xx for labour + $xx for parts/materials.  The tradies then purchase parts/materials at trade price, marks up 20% or more and invoices customer the retail price or more because of the 'time spent sourcing' factor.  They get really cross when you say "l'll buy the materials, you just supply labour" because the mark up is worth heaps to them.


The event planner is the middle man between the manufacturer (you) and the customer (the bride) - just like a retail store is the middle man between the manufacturer/wholesaler and the customer.  We all understand that retail shops mark up prices to pay for their staff/rent/electricity etc.  The event planner also needs to be paid - eventually its the customer who pays.  


So if you wish to work with an event planner - your choice is to (a) either supply cakes at usual price and have event planner add their mark-up.  Or (b) bump up your quoted price so you can then 'discount' by the agreed commission.  or (c) Third option is an 'introduction' fee (set fee per customer referral, regardless of $spend) - which is really just another form of paid advertising. 


Option C must be considerably lower $$ value than options A & B, because you are dealing with the end customer and doing all the work - not the event planner.  It should also work the other way, if a bride comes to you first and asks for a recommendation for an event planner, then likewise, you should earn the 'introduction fee'.


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