Wanna Recommend A Good Book

Lounge By -K8memphis Updated 19 May 2015 , 12:38am by -K8memphis

-K8memphis Posted 6 Apr 2015 , 8:54pm
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wanna recommend a good book -- and say a little bit about it 

37 replies
Norasmom2 Posted 6 Apr 2015 , 8:59pm
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Before I Wake Up.  I'm reading it now and it's a page-turner.  About a woman who loses her memory but has lots of wondering what she will find out next!


-K8memphis Posted 6 Apr 2015 , 9:04pm
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i've been reading some wwll books

-The Nightengale by kristin hannah is outstanding for adults -- while it's fiction it's based on the reality of wwll occupied france - the story of two sisters and how the war ravages them (and everything in it's path) in such completely different ways and their success and resilience regardless -- stunning

it has over 2600 five star reviews on amazon and 18 one star reviews -- if you can handle the hardness of the war issues that are presented it's just not be missed

Claire138 Posted 7 Apr 2015 , 3:52pm
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Thanks for the recommendation K8, I love history so will look this up. I'm currently reading the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon which I'm loving.

Jedi Knight Posted 7 Apr 2015 , 3:59pm
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I've read Outlander series many times. Each time she comes with a new book I read the whole series again.


I'd like to recommend 'The Night Circus', by Erin Morgenstern. Magical.

Claire138 Posted 7 Apr 2015 , 4:19pm
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I'm on number 5 (The fiery cross), am so grateful for the Passover holiday as I've loads more time to read than usual (no cakes)!

Did you know they have bought out a tv series of the books?

-K8memphis Posted 10 Apr 2015 , 10:07pm
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i just finished "Monuments Men" allied heroes, nazi thieves, and the greatest treasure hunt in history by Robert M. Edsel-- it's just simply mind blowing -- yes i know there's a movie which i haven't seen yet -- but i am going to see "Woman in Gold" next week -- can't wait!

i also finished "the Nazi Officer's Wife" how one jewish woman survived the holocaust by Edith H. Beer and Susan Dworkin -- about an austrian survivor

i think both of these should be read before going to see the movies -- then after the movie, "woman in gold"  i will read "the lady in gold" the movie is woman and the book is lady --

claire -- i'm really on a roll with the wwll theme -- it's just mind boggling/blowing -- all of these books and movies are nonfiction

norasmom -- sounds very intriguing -- 

claire and jedi K -- the outlander sounds like an awesome series if they a made tv show out of it --


MissyTex Posted 11 Apr 2015 , 2:13am
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River God - Wilbur Smith - fiction - I read it years ago and could hardly put it down.  Historical romantic epic set in ancient Egypt. The life of a brilliant royal slave and those he serves. Action, adventure, romance, war, brutality, graphic depictions of life in that time period. Some harsh passages, but I was engrossed nevertheless. 

The Glass Castle - Jeannette Walls - Memoir - much shorter than River God. A touching memoir of a child and her siblings surviving their dysfunctional parents...alcoholic father, mentally ill mother. She describes the horrible life they had to endure but still expresses her love for her parents. Sad, but a very good book.

Looking forward to the recommendations of others as I am also in need of a good read!

-K8memphis Posted 11 Apr 2015 , 4:33pm
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alright book one of outlander is downloading as i type -- let's see if i can drag myself out of my wwll fixation

Claire138 Posted 11 Apr 2015 , 9:57pm
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I've read both of those books K8, I usually only read WWll/ Holocaust books as it's one of my biggest interests, I'm not so keen on movie adaptations bc they are rarely true to form due to artistic license (something like Schindler's list is an exception to this rule being almost 100% accurate)  but anyway.... (I could talk Holocaust talk all day) a friend insisted I try Outlander as I was traveling to Scotland for a few days for research & I got hooked. Let us know when you come up for air:)

Claire138 Posted 11 Apr 2015 , 10:05pm
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This is an awesome thread btw (I love reading) we could turn it into a mini book club, thanks K8!

-K8memphis Posted 12 Apr 2015 , 12:56pm
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Quote by @Claire138 on 14 hours ago

This is an awesome thread btw (I love reading) we could turn it into a mini book club, thanks K8!


cool!

-K8memphis Posted 12 Apr 2015 , 12:57pm
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i agree about the movies -- i haven't seen Schindler's List yet i avoided it because earlier like 20 years ago before i got on my recent wwll craze -- i had read corrie ten boom's "The Hiding Place" and it scared/changed/repulsed/enlightened me so much that just from watching the trailers of SL i could not fathom watching a move about that subject -- but i mean she walked out of there too -- how did that happen -- and of course i had read dear Anne Franks' book as a teen -- so somehow i got back into this wwll thing and it's just mind blowing --

speaking of a movie that is easier to handle aka wwll fiction i just watched "the book thief" it was a good movie -- not especially graphically realistic -- thank you, God -- but enough to make it's point for a world that needs to stay/be aware -- i read that marcus zusak the author of the book, "TBT"  said he re-wrote it 200 times --

schindler's list is on my list now to watch before too long --

re: the outlander -- i got called away right away (forgot to get the cat's meds at the vet and we're on the last drops yoiks-- had to dash -- 30 minutes left before they closed for the weekend) -- and only got to the first few kindle pages but i really like the writer's style already --

anybody else doing outlander? or whachu readin'?


Claire138 Posted 14 Apr 2015 , 11:13am
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I watched "the book thief" a while ago, I thought it was ok in the scheme of things if not a bit weak.


I've 2 more of the Outlander series to go & am keeping them for the flight next week (11 hours so plenty of time), how are you doing with them K8?

yortma Posted 14 Apr 2015 , 1:04pm
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Claire 138, you have probably read the Winds of War and War and Remembrance by Herman Wouk.  I just finished them and thoroughly enjoyed both.  I would recommend these to anybody, but especially a WWII fan if you haven't read them yet.  I  tend to like historical type novels.  


Others on my all time favorites list:


Cutting for Stone  by Abraham Verghese


The Thirteenth Tale: A novel by Diane Setterfield


Pillars of the Earth and World without end by Ken Follet


The Outlander Series of Course!

-K8memphis Posted 14 Apr 2015 , 3:40pm
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claire -- wish i was reading right now -- doing taxes -- will report re: outlander later... if i survive doing our taxes...

JJGITA76 Posted 14 Apr 2015 , 7:57pm
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I'm a little ashamed to say that I've only just discovered these classic titles  Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte, Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy and Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. But I'm so glad I did, I've truly enjoyed every page of them. I would recommend to anybody ( that's if there's anyone else like me who hasn't read them ) .

Claire138 Posted 14 Apr 2015 , 8:19pm
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Poor you K8 but the Outlander books will be well worth the wait and just what the Dr ordered after taxes!

@Yortma, I have read those books which were brilliant, my mum bought them for me not realizing that were fiction but I really liked them. I've also read all of Ken Follet's books - amazing. He brings his characters to life - I don't know if you've seen them but there were also tv series bought out on both Pillars of the Earth and World without end which were decent (imo) but not a patch on the books.


I was determined that the month of April would be a book buying free month (minus one book - The Brother by Sam Roberts), however due to this fab thread that resolutions appears to have gone straight out the window - or rather to Amazon!


MBalaska Posted 15 Apr 2015 , 2:17am
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"The Millionaire Next Door" what an eye opener.  It's an incredibly inspirational book when you understand that there are a lot of people who are millionaires that are so real, normal, and live just like you...... only much, much smarter with money.  They'd rather have money, than waste money.

I read it when it first came out in 1995 or 96.  My favorite part was the millionaire who was asked what his favorite beer was (The asking party expecting a snobby elitist answer) answer:  "Bud & free."  

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1589795474/?tag=cakecentral-20+millionaire+next+door

MBalaska Posted 15 Apr 2015 , 2:18am
post #20 of 38

"The Millionaire Next Door" what an eye opener.  It's an incredibly inspirational book when you understand that there are a lot of people who are millionaires that are so real, normal, and live just like you...... only much, much smarter with money.  They'd rather have money, than waste money.

I read it when it first came out in 1995 or 96.  My favorite part was the millionaire who was asked what his favorite beer was (The asking party expecting a snobby elitist answer) answer:  "Bud & free."  

MBalaska Posted 15 Apr 2015 , 2:18am
post #21 of 38

"The Millionaire Next Door" what an eye opener.  It's an incredibly inspirational book when you understand that there are a lot of people who are millionaires that are so real, normal, and live just like you...... only much, much smarter with money.  They'd rather have money, than waste money.

I read it when it first came out in 1995 or 96.  My favorite part was the millionaire who was asked what his favorite beer was (The asking party expecting a snobby elitist answer) answer:  "Bud & free."  

MBalaska Posted 15 Apr 2015 , 2:19am
post #22 of 38

"The Millionaire Next Door" what an eye opener.  It's an incredibly inspirational book when you understand that there are a lot of people who are millionaires that are so real, normal, and live just like you...... only much, much smarter with money.  They'd rather have money, than waste money.

I read it when it first came out in 1995 or 96.  My favorite part was the millionaire who was asked what his favorite beer was (The asking party expecting a snobby elitist answer) answer:  "Bud & free."  

-K8memphis Posted 15 Apr 2015 , 2:06pm
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have hardly advanced at all in outlander unless re-reading the first 17 pages several times counts -- 

but after taxes (sogladthatsoverwhew) my daughter and i went to see Woman in Gold -- i loved it --  it had present day then flashbacks to her life/days in vienna --- we both really enjoyed it -

not surprisingly maria the protaganist was torn between leaving the past in the past because it was so painful and then again having the painting rightfully restored to her -- so i really loved it --

yortma -- i haven't read those yet and if i can't get my brain wrapped around outlander amazon here i come -- i'm right behind yah, claire --

mb-- i remember reading/hearing that anecdote "bud & free" now that you mention it but i forgot the book -- thanks for that

JJGITA76 -- i read wuthering heights but i don't remember it, love story, big house, sick wife? something like that -- i remember tale of two cities and oliver though -- there's tons of classics i've never even heard the cliff notes on hahahaha

missytex -- i often close my eyes till i finish reading the graphic parts hahaha

Claire138 Posted 7 May 2015 , 5:57am
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How goes the reading K8?

-K8memphis Posted 7 May 2015 , 1:05pm
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hey claire, reading is going great -- i had a hard time getting into outlander at first suspending my belief or disbelief or however that saying goes  -- then she mentioned wwll and people standing by not helping right some of the wrongs there and that won me right over -- when she stepped up and helped save that one young man from being mutilated when he stole food -- ultimately it was a great book and i will read more in the series but i had to close my eyes reading the more graphic parts -- i learned so many new words -- probably didn't retain many but wow several on a page sometimes -- she is a really really good writer -- great book and my thanks to you and jedi k --

now i'm reading unions street bakery which i am really enjoying about a girl who as a 3 yr old is left at a bakery and is raised by the baker's family and is now grown & her birth mother might come back into her life or at least she might find out more about her -- when i find cooking/baking fiction it is often cheesy and this is not and so it is enjoyable --

and in between i've a few, the german suitcase was a little predictable but still real good, the burgess boys really a great story so well told  --  the pecan man also a little predictable but really good

-K8memphis Posted 7 May 2015 , 2:11pm
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what have you been reading? did you have a good trip?

Claire138 Posted 7 May 2015 , 6:14pm
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You had me laughing at the image of you shutting your eyes during the more graphic parts - it is graphic but the writing is awesome, so detailed. If you watch the series you will have your eyes shut for most of the time

Claire138 Posted 7 May 2015 , 6:14pm
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You had me laughing at the image of you shutting your eyes during the more graphic parts - it is graphic but the writing is awesome, so detailed. If you watch the series you will have your eyes shut for most of the time

I hadn't heard of the German suitcase or The Pecan Man but have read some great reviews on The Burgess Boys so it's on my list.

I had an amazing trip (thanks for asking), it was for my dads birthday and we had such a good time (all my siblings flew in as a surprise), I made him a cake which didn't come out as well as I'd have liked but I was so limited with what materials I could take that it was mostly done on the fly however my dad was thrilled beyond so at least it went down well.

I bought The boys in the Boat which I had read a review about a couple of months ago but hadn't been able to find here, its about 9 Americans and their quest for gold at the 1936 Olympics. I've read quite a lot about the 1936 Olympics so am really happy to have the book.

BTW, Sir Martin Gilbert (recently deceased) wrote some of the most amazing Holocaust books I've ever read, really detailed and so well written. A true master of the pen.

I don't know if you've read any of Deborah Lipstadt's books, they are simply brilliant. I envy her grasp and knowledge. Her books Denying the Holocaust & History on Trial are outstanding, actually anything she has written is amazing. Richard J Evans too.

Anyway....... in answer to your question I'm reading The boys in the Boat and I had a brilliant time!

mark78_fd Posted 8 May 2015 , 2:20am
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Before I Go is a great book! A story about an ill woman who's looking for a replacement for her that'll take care of her husband. Such a feely-emotional book. Shed a few tears whilst reading it. Looking for Alaska is a good book too.

cazza1 Posted 8 May 2015 , 1:42pm
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Seems like some light entertainment might be the order of the day.  What about 'The 100 year old man who jumped out the Window and ran Away' by Jonas Jonasson.  WARNING do not attempt this book is you take life seriously!


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