Upscaling Recipes

Baking By LibbieWaddleton Updated 21 Apr 2015 , 9:16pm by shaloop

LibbieWaddleton Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 12:34pm
post #1 of 18

Hi there

Does anyone have a really accurate way of upscaling recipes for different sized tins?

I have tried working out the litres from a method i found ages ago but i wasn't overly successful. 


If any one can tell me that would be great, also converting it from round to square etc.


Is there an app?

17 replies
sykescakes Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 12:56pm
post #2 of 18

I usually calculate the area of cake the recipe will make, for example if the recipe makes a 9" round cake then the are of that is pi times the radius squared or 3.14x4.5x4.5 = 63.59 inches squared. Then I take the size cake I want it to make, say a 10" square cake and get the area of that which would be 10x10 = 100 inches squared. Then I divide the size I want by the size the recipe makes, so 100/63.59 = 1.5 so you would need to multiply all the ingredients by 1.5. If it doesn't come out as nice of a number as that (like if you needed 1.75 times the recipe) I usually round up and you just end up with slightly thicker layers of the cake. You want to increase the amount of the recipe that will work best with the number of eggs the recipe has in it as well. So if the cake recipe that you were using had 3 eggs in it and you needed 1.5 times the size I would probably just double it and have nice thick layers or use the extra batter for cupcakes. Also remember that because you are not including the height of the layers in the calculation the scaled up version will make the same amount and thickness layers as the original. So for the example I gave, if that recipe made a three layer 9" round cake then 1.5 times the recipe would make a three layer 10" square cake. This is just how I do it and find that it works for me. Others might have easier methods but you really can't go wrong with math :)

LibbieWaddleton Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 12:58pm
post #3 of 18

Im not great at maths but thank you will definitely bare it in mind!

-K8memphis Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 1:13pm
post #4 of 18

i just halve or double/triple/quadruple whatever and then if there's excess i bake a off a few cupcakes or a little bitty cake -- i don't have enough brain cells to spare to get it exact to the teaspoon, gram or ounce -- works for me :)

yortma Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 1:25pm
post #5 of 18

I do essentially the same thing as sykescakes.  I keep the chart below in my binder. It is the area of each pan size (pi r squared) .  I do not calculate the volume which would include multiplying by the depth of each, because my standard cakes are all the same depth.   Otherwise I adjust for different depths.  Most of my recipes would fill 2 9" pans which is 127 square inches.  that would work fine for a 10" and an 8" (128.75).  double it for 2 12" (226)  etc.  HTH


PAN AREAS 

 

SQUARE

 

8"           64  

9"           81

10 "        100   

12"         144

16”         256

 

 

RECTANGLE  

 

9 x 12      108   

11 x 15    165  

12 x 18     216

 

 

ROUNDS  

 

5”             20

6"            28.25   

8"            50.25  

9"            63.5  

10"          78.5  

11“          95

12"          113  

14”          154

16"          201 

 

2 ROUNDS

 

6"         56.5

8"         100.5

9 "         127

10"       157

12"       226

 

HEX

 

6”             23.5

9”               52.5

12”               93.5

15’           146

18”           210.5

 




LibbieWaddleton Posted 2 Apr 2015 , 12:31pm
post #6 of 18

Thank you so much I'll print that chart and try and get my head round the idea... really grateful for your help everyone

-K8memphis Posted 2 Apr 2015 , 12:33pm
post #7 of 18

one other chart -- the one i use

http://www.wilton.com/wedding/wedding-cakes/wedding-cake-data.cfm

but it's in cups

LibbieWaddleton Posted 2 Apr 2015 , 12:36pm
post #8 of 18

That last chart is great too, now i will be able to work out how much cake to make to feed my mum's guests

shaloop Posted 3 Apr 2015 , 7:46pm
post #9 of 18

I also use the Wilton chart and determine how many servings my base recipe makes. Based on the pan size.  Then I multiply by 2 or 3 to get the number of servings I need for the size pan I'm planning to use.

-K8memphis Posted 3 Apr 2015 , 9:04pm
post #10 of 18

shaloop -- why are you multiplying? the wilton chart gives servings for a 4" tall two layer cake each layer 2" no?

LibbieWaddleton Posted 14 Apr 2015 , 12:46pm
post #11 of 18

Yortma,


can i ask, the area you ahve measured out on your chart is that in cm or inches, i'm guessing inches but would be good to clarify

-K8memphis Posted 15 Apr 2015 , 1:33pm
post #12 of 18

libbie -- i'm not yortma obviously but it's inches -- the quote mark after the number indicates inches ergo 6" is six inches

shaloop Posted 21 Apr 2015 , 5:42pm
post #13 of 18


Quote by @-K8memphis on 3 Apr 2015 , 2:04pm

shaloop -- why are you multiplying? the wilton chart gives servings for a 4" tall two layer cake each layer 2" no?

Say my original recipe makes an 8" cake.  The wilton chart says that an 8" cake is 24 servings.  I want to make a 6" cake, which is 12 servings according to the chart. So i would decide my recipe in half and make a half recipe for a 6" cake. If i want to make a  12" cake, 56 servings according to the chart, I'd multiply my original recipe by 2.5 and that would be 60 servings, enough for a 12" cake.

shaloop Posted 21 Apr 2015 , 5:44pm
post #14 of 18


Quote by @-K8memphis on 3 Apr 2015 , 2:04pm

shaloop -- why are you multiplying? the wilton chart gives servings for a 4" tall two layer cake each layer 2" no?

Say my original recipe makes an 8" cake.  The wilton chart says that an 8" cake is 24 servings.  I want to make a 6" cake, which is 12 servings according to the chart. So i would devide my recipe in half and make a half recipe for a 6" cake. If i want to make a  12" cake, 56 servings according to the chart, I'd multiply my original recipe by 2.5 and that would be 60 servings, enough for a 12" cake.

-K8memphis Posted 21 Apr 2015 , 6:23pm
post #15 of 18

there's another way to use that chart shaloop -- if you know how many cups of batter your recipe makes then just use the 'cups of batter for a 2" cake' other column of the chart which is for one 2" cake -- the servings column is for a 4" completed tier -- 

the servings are determined by the footprint of the cake not the batter amount --

rexygirl Posted 21 Apr 2015 , 7:53pm
post #16 of 18

Be wary of doubling or tripling your original recipe! A friend of mine is an ex pastry school teacher and chemically speaking this method does not always come out with a consistent result (ie doesn't rise properly) especially using home based kitchen equipment. I always have friends that ask why their chocolate chip cookies don't come out the same as mine... My first question always is did u double the batch....I used to do the same thing until my friend told me that by doing that each cookie may not get the proper amount of levening yielding in flat cookies and that our standard kitchen aid may not be able to distribute the ingredients properly through a large batch. Ever since I make everything in separate batches, never have a problem with cakes or cookies....bake off some cuppies with any leftover batter:)

-K8memphis Posted 21 Apr 2015 , 8:51pm
post #17 of 18

interesting point, rexygirl, and it could be true for some bakers --

me, i never knew that could ever be a factor so for over 40 years of professional baking i just straight up multiplied my recipes out to whatever i needed and it worked -- when you are filling a 5 to 60 quart bowl you can't do separate/individual batches you'd never get done -- 

careful procedures are always a must when baking -- you can't just toss in the leavening helter skelter -- either mix it into the flour or into the creamed butter sugar with spices -- if the leavening is not incorporated correctly it's not the fault of the mixer

shaloop Posted 21 Apr 2015 , 9:16pm
post #18 of 18


Quote by @rexygirl on 1 hour ago

Be wary of doubling or tripling your original recipe! A friend of mine is an ex pastry school teacher and chemically speaking this method does not always come out with a consistent result (ie doesn't rise properly) especially using home based kitchen equipment. 

Thanks for tip. However, I've scaled up to a 16" round and never had any problems. Also, like K8memphis,  I've done large scale production in a 20 qt mixer and one batch at a time would never work. Besides, i wouldnt want 4 seperately mixed batches of batter baked together in one tin. I feel that layer may be inconsistent. 

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%