Greaseproof Paper Issue

Baking By Sweet_Toof Updated 1 Apr 2015 , 1:15pm by 4laynes

Sweet_Toof Posted 31 Mar 2015 , 11:31am
post #1 of 27

I have a mud cake recipe that I always use 

today I've baked 6 cakes and every single cake I've had this same issue: 

i grease my pan by spraying with canola oil from a spray can   I then line the cake pan with grease proof paper and then I spray with more oil and then add cake mix and bake 

SO 

in my fan forced oven after about half blue I then the light on to see how they're doing g and the grease proof paper has moved away from the sides of my cake pan and embedded themselves into my cake 

what am I doing wrong? 

It's only a low oven I don't think the fan has the force to blow the paper 

am I using too much oil and the cake mix is getting in behind the paper and expanding and bringing it forward? It's driving me crazy! 

26 replies
Lwarmke79 Posted 31 Mar 2015 , 11:38am
post #2 of 27

I am a little confused. I do the same but I only line the bottom of the pan. Are you lining the sides? Or is it somehow shifting from the bottom to the sides. 

Sweet_Toof Posted 31 Mar 2015 , 10:41pm
post #3 of 27

Oh really? I line the bottom and the sides 

the bottom stays in tact 

the sides are moving into the cake 

Why don't you Line the sides? 

Pastrybaglady Posted 31 Mar 2015 , 10:47pm
post #4 of 27

Because it's so easy to slide a knife around the side to release the cake?

Lwarmke79 Posted 31 Mar 2015 , 10:50pm
post #5 of 27

That ^ and when my cake is just done it pulls away from the sides. I never line the sides, ever. 

Sweet_Toof Posted 31 Mar 2015 , 10:53pm
post #6 of 27

When I was doing my cake decorating course they taught us to line the sides as well just incase they weren't 100% liquid tight 

sounds like I should stop bothering?! 

I also thought maybe it wasn't a bad thing because they are stainless steel the cake would just stick- are you guys using stainless steel or coated pans? 

Lwarmke79 Posted 31 Mar 2015 , 11:04pm
post #7 of 27

Mine are not coated. But i spray then parchment  the bottom only and spray again. Never sticks. Try it!

Pastrybaglady Posted 31 Mar 2015 , 11:08pm
post #8 of 27

I have both.  I just use baking spray now.  I used to use parchment but turned out I didn't really need it - one less step!

Sweet_Toof Posted 31 Mar 2015 , 11:12pm
post #9 of 27

My cakes have stuck even with the paper when it's moved 

I'm using canola oil spray 

Is this the issue? 

thecakewitch Posted 31 Mar 2015 , 11:52pm
post #10 of 27

Maybe you're over spraying? 

Sweet_Toof Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 12:11am
post #11 of 27

I AM over spraying! I'm worried it'll stick. Ok so I'm not allowed to spray too much? What's the science behind that? Damn cakes I don't get it! 

Apti Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 12:30am
post #12 of 27

When I was doing my cake decorating course they taught us to line the sides as well just incase they weren't 100% liquid tight 

sounds like I should stop bothering?! 

I also thought maybe it wasn't a bad thing because they are stainless steel the cake would just stick- are you guys using stainless steel or coated pans? 


Read more at http://www.cakecentral.com/forum/t/786907/greaseproof-paper-issue#post_7583600#6WyFRCXOQABtxfzx.99

Sweet-Toof~~What is your baking experience level?  Newbie?  What is your country?  Australia or UK? 

With the old forum format, we could see how many posts and see your photo gallery, but that is gone now (hopefully not forever....).    I am assuming UK or Australia because you said "mud cake" which is not a common cake in the USA. 

I have no idea what you mean by "Liquid tight".  Are you using a springform pan?  In the USA we typically use high grade aluminum pans that are 2" deep.  We do not typically use springform pans. 


If you line the inside edges of your cake pan, the batter WILL cause the paper to be "sucked in" a bit around the edges.  This can be corrected with frosting.

When I was doing my cake decorating course they taught us to line the sides as well just incase they weren't 100% liquid tight 

sounds like I should stop bothering?! 

I also thought maybe it wasn't a bad thing because they are stainless steel the cake would just stick- are you guys using stainless steel or coated pans? 


Read more at http://www.cakecentral.com/forum/t/786907/greaseproof-paper-issue#post_7583600#6WyFRCXOQABtxfzx.99

When I was doing my cake decorating course they taught us to line the sides as well just incase they weren't 100% liquid tight 

sounds like I should stop bothering?! 

I also thought maybe it wasn't a bad thing because they are stainless steel the cake would just stick- are you guys using stainless steel or coated pans? 


Read more at http://www.cakecentral.com/forum/t/786907/greaseproof-paper-issue#post_7583600#6WyFRCXOQABtxfzx.99
Magic Mouthfuls Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 1:28am
post #13 of 27

Sweet Toot - I use stainless steel pans for my mud cakes.   I spray the cake tin (with canola oil) all the way to the top edge, but not the greaseproof paper, which I line both bottom & sides.  I use fan forced oven.  I fill my batter to 3/4 full of cake tin, so the weight of the batter should hold that side paper in.

In my opinion, you want a mud cake to stick to the paper, but not the pan= so dont spray the paper after it is in the pan.  The high fat content of a mud cake means the paper still easily peels away when cake is cold.

Last bake I made a baking paper lid for my cakes too - a circle just a few mm smaller than the cake tin, with a 1cm hole cut out in centre.  It kind of steamed my cakes, so they came out much taller, less dome, less meringue crack on top and baked much quicker.  I was jumping for joy at how much different the 'lid' made. 

I have found in Australia that the all the brands have changed their 'recipe' for baking paper to some awful cheap paper.  But I found the good stuff at Cakes Around Town (I buy of roll of side only paper, I think its about 5" high and 20metres long).  For the bottoms I found the original high quality, thick and slippery baking paper in Reject Shop.

I also wrap my cake tins in homemade baking strip (folded newspaper wrapped in foil, attached with all-metal bulldog clip).

Hope that helps



Sweet_Toof Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 3:30am
post #14 of 27

Hey Apti I'm from Australia 

i have baked many many mud cakes using this one ingredient. I don't do this for a living but it's been about 7 years so I have done plenty- wedding cakes, bday, baptism etc 

our pans are 3" tall 

im using a stainless steel one it's not a springform, just regular but I was told to spray, line it with paper and spray 

Sweet_Toof Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 3:32am
post #15 of 27

Magic mouthfuls 

thanks that was a really helpful post 

And nice work on the lid, that's really cool! 

 I've got 3 more cakes to bake today so ill try doing it without the second spray 

Sweet_Toof Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 3:35am
post #16 of 27

Magic mouthfuls how does the lid work? If its a bit smaller than the tin do you rest it on top of the cake batter or something? 

I once tried wrapping the tin in some calico fabric but it just took too long to bake so I never bothered again 

i do drop the temp to 150 instead of the recommended 160 so the outside edges don't dry out so much - I THINK It helps?! 

Magic Mouthfuls Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 7:24am
post #17 of 27

Yes, the lid rests gently on top of the batter.  It sticks in some places, but not an issue if you trim your tops off like I do.  My fan force isnt too strong, so it doesnt blow off, but the high sides of the baking paper & wrap cushion that wind anyway.


My made-at-home wraps are now just kept in the drawer with the baking paper etc.  It took 3 mins to make and I've used it 20-30 times before they get too raggedy.  The Age and Weekend Australian is a great size - a sheet is folded longwise about 4 times (down to 4" tall)

I usually drop the temperature too.  My pans are also 3" tall.  :-)  Happy baking.  


Got 2 white choc muds to make this weekend, and some dark choc mud cake pops tonite to make. 

Sweet_Toof Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 7:31am
post #18 of 27

Gahhh! It happened again! This time I didn't grease the inside of the paper and they still moved into the cake! 

I mustn't be sticking the paper against the walls properly and allowing air to get in there- dunno :o

Sweet_Toof Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 7:32am
post #19 of 27

I did use a different brand of canola spray I think it's too heavy & frothy 

Magic Mouthfuls Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 7:44am
post #20 of 27

I use Woolies homebrand canola spray.  What did you buy this time?

Magic Mouthfuls Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 8:07am
post #21 of 27

Hey Sweet_Toof, I quoted on a huge mud cake today to serve 285 people to which I quoted $800.  She knocked me back saying everyone else was quoting $150.  Whoah - I can even buy the ingredients for that much.  Could you?

Sweet_Toof Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 8:44am
post #22 of 27

I was using coles brand canola oil in the can. Can't remember the brand I had today but it was something "nicer"!!! 


Magic mouthfuls where are you from? 

Sweet_Toof Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 8:49am
post #23 of 27

Magic mouthfuls haha no way could I make a cake for that price and even if I could buy all the ingredients I would be charging more then that! 

This one I am doing is 4 tier & 1 cutting slab out the back   130 DESSERT serves for $440 DELIVERED! 

Magic Mouthfuls Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 9:02am
post #24 of 27

$440 for a 4 tier is cheap in my book.  Most of my cakes come out at $6-$12 per dessert serve depending on the level of decoration.  I'm sick of working for $2 per hour.


I'm in Sapphire Coast NSW - Bega cheese country.  Where are you?

Sweet_Toof Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 9:05am
post #25 of 27

I'm in Melbourne 

Do you do this for a living or you have other work on the side? 

I underestimate my talent and confidence and don't charge much only for this reason but then also I look at shops and think will if I want this sale I need to give them a good price and give them reason to use me not the shop. Yes as it stands I'm also paying myself $2 p/hr! 

4laynes Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 1:11pm
post #26 of 27

I use pan grease which is equal parts margarine, shortening and flour.  I usually do a half cup each and it keeps well in the fridge.  I've never had a problem sticking, but I also grease the bottom of the pan and the parchment circle.  I'm tempted to skip the parchment and see what happens.

4laynes Posted 1 Apr 2015 , 1:15pm
post #27 of 27

Oh, and I just grease the sides, no parchment on them.

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