Another Pricing Question

Decorating By katie1214 Updated 23 Feb 2015 , 8:12pm by winniemog

katie1214 Posted 23 Feb 2015 , 3:18pm
post #1 of 4

AI make cakes for family, sometimes friends, as a hobby. I’ve had plenty of people ask me to make cakes for them but I turn them down because I don’t have a business and I like to keep my hobby fun and not stress about the business piece :) My daycare owner (owned by a mother/daughter team and I’ve been using them for just about 8 years) asked me to make a cake for her mom’s 80th birthday this Saturday. I was ready to turn her down but then she offered to take the cost of the cake off of my daycare bill. I said yes but now I’m not sure how much my cake will “cost”.

It’s 2 tier, 10 inch and 8 inch, all buttercream with a fondant 80 on top. Flavors are vanilla cake with a strawberry swirl and strawberry cream filling and a chocolate fudge cake with salted caramel filling, all scratch made. I don’t keep track of my ingredient costs so would it be appropriate to use the Wilton serving chart and say $4 per serving? She has had bakeries make custom cakes for prior birthdays so I don’t think she will have sticker shock. I also don’t want to say credit me with what you think is fair, because what if that’s only $50. Any suggestions? Thanks!

3 replies
Gingerlocks Posted 23 Feb 2015 , 4:24pm
post #2 of 4

Pricing for barter, shouldn't be any different from pricing for sale/cash. It's impossible to tell you what your costs and what your time is worth..that's up to you to decide. I would start by searching here for all the different pricing threads, and take a look at this article which should help you get started on creating your own pricing strategy.

katie1214 Posted 23 Feb 2015 , 5:03pm
post #3 of 4

AThanks! I did spend some time over the weekend looking at other pricing threads. Since I don't keep track of my ingredient prices, I was looking for an easier way to figure it out. I'll take a look at the site you posted. Appreciate your response!

winniemog Posted 23 Feb 2015 , 8:12pm
post #4 of 4

AYou can cost your ingredients after the fact - say flour costs $1 per kilo and you used half a kilo, that's 50 cents for flour, etc, etc. You can estimate your time, calculate your wage, and don't forget non-edibles and other incidentals eg electricity, paper towel. You don't have to track as you go along.

And a warning for the future - set a price in advance, this person may be expecting.a completely different price. Stand your ground!

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