I'm Confused- Butter Cream And Fondant.

Decorating By cakelove2105 Updated 24 Feb 2015 , 9:19pm by cakelove2105

cakelove2105 Posted 20 Feb 2015 , 9:10pm
post #1 of 13

Hello Bakers,

 

I see many bakers applying just enough buttercream so that the fondant sticks to their cakes but, on the other hand, I see bakers double-coating their cakes in butter cream (crumb-coating and then another coat of butter cream) without worrying about whether their fondant may get ruined. Can anybody tell me what's the real rule to this. I mean, is it supposed to be just enough butter cream to stick your fondant or should it be double-coating so that there's more butter cream and therefore more flavor on your cakes?? or is it supposed to be a matter of preference?

 

I have no idea....

12 replies
petitecat Posted 20 Feb 2015 , 9:36pm
post #2 of 13

AJust preference! No rules as to how much buttercream you coat cakes with. You might find that if you only crumb coat, you'll need thicker fondant so the lumps and bumps don't show :)

remnant3333 Posted 21 Feb 2015 , 2:24am
post #3 of 13

Personally, I can not stand fondant. Like another said, it is a matter of preference. I would not want any cakes that have fondant on them. I am purely a buttercream type of person!!!  I seen plenty of wedding cakes with fondant but most kids that I know would not want anything except for buttercream.  I would rather have ganache or buttercream any day!!!  To each his own!!

cakelove2105 Posted 21 Feb 2015 , 2:47am
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by remnant3333 
 

Personally, I can not stand fondant. Like another said, it is a matter of preference. I would not want any cakes that have fondant on them. I am purely a butter cream type of person!!!  I seen plenty of wedding cakes with fondant but most kids that I know would not want anything except for buttercream.  I would rather have ganache or buttercream any day!!!  To each his own!!

I agree! I hate fondant. I personally wouldn't order a cake that's decorated with fondant, but what can we do? we must admit that we can do a lot more decorating styles with fondant than with icings, and cake decorating works look more neat. I guess we have to go with what's "in." Honestly, that's the only reason why I'm learning how to deal with fondant.

maybenot Posted 22 Feb 2015 , 4:18am
post #5 of 13

I apply a full coat of buttercream under all of my fondant--that's at least 1/4th inch on the sides, a bit more on top.  That way, the fondant is just a decoration, not the icing.

 

I always tell people to eat cake slices from from the bottom up, or to take off that teeny, tiny piece of fondant [unless they have an edge piece] and enjoy.  It's just not a big deal to rid the cake slice of a 1.5"x2"x1/8th inch scrap of sugar dough.

cakelove2105 Posted 24 Feb 2015 , 12:31am
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by maybenot 
 

I apply a full coat of buttercream under all of my fondant--that's at least 1/4th inch on the sides, a bit more on top.  That way, the fondant is just a decoration, not the icing.

 

I always tell people to eat cake slices from from the bottom up, or to take off that teeny, tiny piece of fondant [unless they have an edge piece] and enjoy.  It's just not a big deal to rid the cake slice of a 1.5"x2"x1/8th inch scrap of sugar dough.

Thanks a lot for your comment maybenot! People usually don't like fondant, but like I said, fondant allows us to be even more creative.I was afraid of double-coating my cakes because I thought it would ruin the fondant decoration as it would be too wet.

Dr_Hfuhruhurr Posted 24 Feb 2015 , 1:49am
post #7 of 13

A

Original message sent by cakelove2105

Thanks a lot for your comment [B]maybenot! [/B]People usually don't like fondant...

Like most generalizations, I assume that's not universally true. I like fondant on occasion, and I'm sure it has its share of fans. Anecdotally, I know quite a few people who enjoy it.

As for your concerns about too much buttercream "ruining" your fondant, I'm not sure how that would happen. Whether it's a thick coat of buttercream or thin, the same surface area is touching the fondant. I saw a Satin Ice demo once where the demonstrator commented that your buttercream layer should be just as thick when using fondant as it would be if you weren't using fondant. It's the "main event," as it were--people want the frosting.

costumeczar Posted 24 Feb 2015 , 3:21am
post #8 of 13

Part of it might depend on whether you cover the cake when it's cold or not. If your buttercream is hard from the fridge you can cover thick buttercream a lot easier than you can is it's soft. Then, you'd probably use less buttercream. When we were taught how to cover cakes in fondant in culinary school back in the olden times, it was a thinner layer of buttercream that you'd use. Now people put thicker buttercream underit.

 

Or you could just do buttercream and forget the fondant, that's what most of my customers want. The only person I've ever had who really liked fondant was my sales rep from Staples, who waxed poetic about how good fondant was when he was supposed to be selling me paper. Most people come to me and start the meeting off by saying "I don't want fondant."

cakelove2105 Posted 24 Feb 2015 , 4:34am
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Hfuhruhurr 


Like most generalizations, I assume that's not universally true. I like fondant on occasion, and I'm sure it has its share of fans. Anecdotally, I know quite a few people who enjoy it.

As for your concerns about too much buttercream "ruining" your fondant, I'm not sure how that would happen. Whether it's a thick coat of buttercream or thin, the same surface area is touching the fondant. I saw a Satin Ice demo once where the demonstrator commented that your buttercream layer should be just as thick when using fondant as it would be if you weren't using fondant. It's the "main event," as it were--people want the frosting.

Hi Dr_Hfuhruhurr, when

Quote:

Originally Posted by costumeczar 
 

Part of it might depend on whether you cover the cake when it's cold or not. If your buttercream is hard from the fridge you can cover thick buttercream a lot easier than you can is it's soft. Then, you'd probably use less buttercream. When we were taught how to cover cakes in fondant in culinary school back in the olden times, it was a thinner layer of buttercream that you'd use. Now people put thicker buttercream underit.

 

Or you could just do buttercream and forget the fondant, that's what most of my customers want. The only person I've ever had who really liked fondant was my sales rep from Staples, who waxed poetic about how good fondant was when he was supposed to be selling me paper. Most people come to me and start the meeting off by saying "I don't want fondant."

Hi costumezar, I really didn't mean to say that no one likes fondant, but like you said, there's only a few people who really like it. Especially in my culture; we usually deal with Italian meringue not even buttercream. In my humble opinion, the only reason why most of the customers would accept a cake with fondant is because of the type of decoration they can get.

MBalaska Posted 24 Feb 2015 , 4:55am
post #10 of 13

@cakelove2105  I don't make many fondant covered cakes, as no one here wants one.  However when I do, I torte a 2" layer of cake into two 1" layers of cake.  That lets me put more icing on the inside to make up for less icing on the outside.  Because it's not just the 1/4" of icing outside that's missing, it's the flourishes of icing decorations,  the shell borders etc, that are also missing on the outside.

MKC Posted 24 Feb 2015 , 1:44pm
post #11 of 13

AI use cake boards. when the cake is placed on the board it leave a 1/4 gap between the cake and the edge of the cake board. this is what I fill with buttercream or ganache. the videos from Inspired by Michele (google it) explains it well.

cakelove2105 Posted 24 Feb 2015 , 9:18pm
post #12 of 13

Quote:

Originally Posted by MBalaska
 That lets me put more icing on the inside to make up for less icing on the outside.  Because it's not just the 1/4" of icing outside that's missing, it's the flourishes of icing decorations,  the shell borders etc, that are also missing on the outside.

 

i'm so with you on this!

cakelove2105 Posted 24 Feb 2015 , 9:19pm
post #13 of 13

Quote:

Originally Posted by MKC 

 the videos from Inspired by Michele (google it) explains it well.

I'm going take a look at it. Thanks :)

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