Air Bulge - Question!

Decorating By storestore Updated 30 Jan 2015 , 2:18pm by storestore

storestore Posted 29 Jan 2015 , 2:52pm
post #1 of 5

Hi all.

 

         My most recent cake had a big air bulge that formed on one side. It was so big it stretched the fondant out and I literally had to cut a patch of fondant out and mend it back together (luckily there was a decoration that covered it). I tort, fill, crum coat, ceramic tile for 4 hours, ice, put in the fridge, cover with fondant the next day, decorate. It was towards the end of the decorating process that I noticed the bulge. I read on a cake boss tutorial yesterday that covering a cold cake with fondant and then letting it come to room temperature causes the air bulge problem because the cold air in the cake expands and finds it's way out. So my question is this: How can I avoid this issue? I use the fridge to much because I often have multiple cakes due on the same day and I can't leave them out all week while I work on them. Also, I like to put fondant on a cold cake while the icing is stiff. What is your timeline for making multiple cakes?

4 replies
Lfredden Posted 29 Jan 2015 , 3:22pm
post #2 of 5

AI always cut out a small hole in the fondant. I usually make the hole top center if I'm going to stack something on top or put a decoration there. Otherwise you can do it anywhere that will be covered by a decoration. The only time I've gotten a bulge is when a took a cake decorating class. I researched it and have done this since and have never had a problem.

leah_s Posted 30 Jan 2015 , 4:43am
post #3 of 5

AYou need an "escape valve". Small hole at the top that will eventually. Be covered with another tier, or run a thin sharp blade along the bottom edge to break the seal between the cake and board. You may mess up the bottom edge, so you'd need a border or ribbon for that edge.

JAYSUNE Posted 30 Jan 2015 , 11:57am
post #4 of 5

AHi, just wondered if bulges around the middle of the cake (where it's been filled with butter cream before covering in fondant) are caused by air as well? Thanks

storestore Posted 30 Jan 2015 , 2:18pm
post #5 of 5

Wow! I have never heard of putting an escape valve in the cake but that makes perfect sense! I can't believe I didn't know about that option until now. I'll try that out. Thanks guys!

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