Amount Of Fondant Required For Cake Boards.

Decorating By bubs1stbirthday Updated 31 Jan 2015 , 10:59pm by CookieNibz

bubs1stbirthday Posted 29 Jan 2015 , 3:56am
post #1 of 12

I have searched high and low but cannot find the answer to this question so any and all help would be appreciated.

 

Can anyone tell me how I work out how much fondant is needed to cover a cake board?

 

In particular I am working with either a 10 or 11 inch board at the moment but would like to know if there is a formula used to calculate this for any size board.

 

Thankyou.

11 replies
Magic Mouthfuls Posted 29 Jan 2015 , 12:49pm
post #2 of 12

Yeah, this one gets me every time - so I've started keeping records on my costing spreadsheet.

 

Not scientific, but this is what I started allowing/pricing for....  

7" round 300g

8" round 350g

9" round 350g

10" round 400g

11" round 450g

12" round 500g 

 

Problem is... i cannot recall if this is the quantity for the board, or a cake sitting on a board 4" bigger than the cake - because its almost midnight and my brain is fried. I am thinking, if I am making a 7" cake, I will put it on a 11" board, therefore I will need 300g.  

melmar02 Posted 29 Jan 2015 , 1:00pm
post #3 of 12

AThe bakingit.com site has a calculator - it is to cover the entire board, not just around the cake.

Lfredden Posted 29 Jan 2015 , 3:41pm
post #4 of 12

AI've stopped covering the entire cake board. I roll a long sausage shape then flatten it with a rolling pin while stretching it to elongate it. Make your strip long enough to go around the cake. With an exacto knife or pizza cutter cut one side of the strip so you have a straight edge. Gently roll your strip and place on the board and around the cake which should already be on the board. The exposed part of the board should have a thin coat of shortening or Corn syrup so the fondant will adhere to it. Overlap the two ends in the back of the cake and with a sharp knife cut through both pieces so they can perfectly meet. I massage the crease so both ends blend together. Then run the knife along the edge of the board to trim the excess. I was a bit scared when I first tried it but it was super simple and I didnt use nearly as much fondant which ends up going to waste anyway. Also you don't have to do it ahead of time to let it dry out. There are you tube videos out there if you need to see it.

bubs1stbirthday Posted 29 Jan 2015 , 9:19pm
post #5 of 12

Quote:

Originally Posted by Magic Mouthfuls 
 

Yeah, this one gets me every time - so I've started keeping records on my costing spreadsheet. 

 

Problem is... i cannot recall if this is the quantity for the board, or a cake sitting on a board 4" bigger than the cake - because its almost midnight and my brain is fried. I am thinking, if I am making a 7" cake, I will put it on a 11" board, thefore I will need 300g.  

Thank you very much for sharing this as you have obviously put time and effort into doing this chart up. It is very helpful, I think you may be right in saying the 300gm is the right amount for the 11 inch board if you roll it pretty thin.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by melmar02 

The bakingit.com site has a calculator - it is to cover the entire board, not just around the cake.

Thank you for your answer I have seen the website but even though I signed up I suspect that it is a dodgy website? as I cannot get it to work at all. Thank you for taking the time to reply.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lfredden 

I've stopped covering the entire cake board.

Thank you for the advice and for taking the time to reply to me, this cake I will roll the full board as I need to put a fondant ribbon on the base of the cake so want the board fondant set hard before I have to work with it but your method is one that I have considered in the past and will again in the future no doubt.

melmar02 Posted 29 Jan 2015 , 9:32pm
post #6 of 12

AHave you tried the website using chrome or firefox? I read somewhere it doesn't work well with explorer so I've only visited it using chrome.

bubs1stbirthday Posted 30 Jan 2015 , 12:06am
post #7 of 12


I actually have no idea what that means lol - I am very computer illiterate in anything other than the basics. We do use google I know that much so  maybe that is why I can't get it to work? I have tried to use the site a couple of times since I signed up but had no luck.

CookieNibz Posted 30 Jan 2015 , 5:48am
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by bubs1stbirthday 
 


I actually have no idea what that means lol - I am very computer illiterate in anything other than the basics. We do use google I know that much so  maybe that is why I can't get it to work? I have tried to use the site a couple of times since I signed up but had no luck.


safari, firefox & chrome is the name of your web browser. When you go online do you click on a pic of a compass (safari), a tri- colored wheel of sorts (chrome) or a globe with an orange fox wrapped around it (firefox). Internet explorer is another web browser, but for the life of me i cant remember what their icon is.

bubs1stbirthday Posted 30 Jan 2015 , 10:50am
post #9 of 12


Thanks CookieNibz - I have figured out the Google chrome and how to enable Java Script (yaii!) and now the website works - lol not a dodgy website after all, sorry bakingit.com :-)

CookieNibz Posted 30 Jan 2015 , 4:22pm
post #10 of 12

A

Original message sent by bubs1stbirthday

Thanks CookieNibz - I have figured out the Google chrome and how to enable Java Script (yaii!) and now the website works - lol not a dodgy website after all, sorry bakingit.com :-)

Np, I'm not exactly tech savvy either, lol, I've been there!!! Glad u got it to work :)

LizzieAylett Posted 30 Jan 2015 , 6:03pm
post #11 of 12

Internet explorer has an "e" as its icon :-)

CookieNibz Posted 31 Jan 2015 , 10:59pm
post #12 of 12

A

Original message sent by LizzieAylett

Internet explorer has an "e" as its icon :-)

[B]AHHHHHHH YEAH![/B] that's what it was! Lololol. Been awhile since I used that!

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