When To Take A Cake Out Of The Pan?

Decorating By Laetia Updated 12 Jan 2015 , 1:42am by Laetia

Laetia Posted 10 Jan 2015 , 5:39pm
post #1 of 10

AGood morning everyone! Ok, I have a beginner's question for you today. When to take the cake out of the pan? I grew up taking the cake out of the pan as soon as It's come out of the oven, to prevent over-cooking because of the remaining heat in the pan itself. Then I was told to let the cake cool in the pan for about 15 minutes (until the pan can be touch with bare hands). That's the way I do it now. Seem's to work ok for me. But recentely I've read posts here where some of you recomand to let the cake cool completely in the pan. What are the pros and cons of each techniques, and wich one is the good one? Thanks Laetia

9 replies
MimiFix Posted 10 Jan 2015 , 6:41pm
post #2 of 10

The cooler the cake, the less likely it is to fall apart. I use parchment paper in most cake pans and wait until the cakes are room temp before removing. When not using parchment I wait 15-20 minutes before removing cake from pan.

ayla gh Posted 10 Jan 2015 , 7:09pm
post #3 of 10

AI think it is better to wait 10minutes for butter cakes and then remove.Up side down to the rack.

leave spong cakes until cool down completly in the pan and then remove.

Apti Posted 10 Jan 2015 , 10:40pm
post #4 of 10

Quote:

Originally Posted by MimiFix 
 

The cooler the cake, the less likely it is to fall apart. I use parchment paper in most cake pans and wait until the cakes are room temp before removing. When not using parchment I wait 15-20 minutes before removing cake from pan.


This.

 

p.s.  IF your cake has a dome, remove the dome before turning out onto a cooling rack or the cake may "split".

kakeladi Posted 11 Jan 2015 , 5:35am
post #5 of 10

.........IF your cake has a dome, remove the dome before turning out onto a cooling rack or the cake may "split"....

 

Good advice BUT.....if it is baked right there will not be a dome :)  For any cake pan that uses one cake mix bake it at 300 degrees for about 20 minutes, then turn the oven up to 325 for an equal time OR until you can smell that heavenly smell in the next room :)  Be sure to check by the 'touch' method - lightly touch the center w/a finger; if it spring back it's done.  Usually if the cake is pulling away from the pan it is over baked :(

Magic Mouthfuls Posted 11 Jan 2015 , 11:43am
post #6 of 10

I am a'thinkin that the lighter the cake, the more immediately you take it out of the pan.

 

So a sponge cake comes out immediately (or that magic spot when the cake naturally separates itself from the edges - usually within 1-3 mins) , and any parchment paper taken off immediately before the moisture starts to sweat underneath.  

For a medium texture/density cake ie butter cakes/yellow cakes wait about 5-10 mins for the cake to settle before removing it from the pan.  

But for rich, heavy, dense cakes like Mud Cake and Traditional Fruit Cakes - these get left in the pan until the cake is cold.

Narie Posted 11 Jan 2015 , 2:57pm
post #7 of 10

Regular butter cakes (or cake mix cakes) -set the timer for ten minutes and turn out when it rings. This especially works for Bundt cakes.  American sponge cakes and angel food cakes (tube pans) turn over on bottle and allow to cool completely before turning right side up and cutting them free from the pan.

jgifford Posted 11 Jan 2015 , 8:39pm
post #8 of 10

As with everything else, you're getting differing opinions on this one.  I have my cakes out of the oven, leveled and out of the pan within 2 minutes.  Try it both ways.  Whatever works for you is what you need to do.

Apti Posted 11 Jan 2015 , 11:39pm
post #9 of 10

I adore cakecentral.  Someone on here has a saying that goes like this:  "One baker's never-ever is another baker's go-to".   Ain't it the truth. 

 

Since I hobby bake (and take forever to get a cake project together), I always land on the side of being more prepared and more careful (probably WHY it takes forever....).  If I was a production baker (time = money), I'm sure I'd have enough experience on 'what works for me' to slap cakes around willy-nilly and forego all sorts of the 'careful' steps taken as a hobby baker.

 

This is such an interesting hobby.  No matter which way I turn, there is always something new/different around that corner.

Laetia Posted 12 Jan 2015 , 1:42am
post #10 of 10

AThank's everyone for your answers. Since most of my cakes are butter cakes and I use parchment paper in my pans, I'll continue to remove them from the pan 15 minutes after they're out of the oven. I guess I was doing the right thing after all!

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