Just Starting Out

Business By 4BIDDENSWEETS Updated 7 Jan 2015 , 6:07pm by mattyeatscakes

4BIDDENSWEETS Posted 6 Jan 2015 , 7:27pm
post #1 of 10

I really had a question about just starting out and the money you spend. I eventually want to open my own business but I want to make sure my skills are perfected and up to today's standards, my question is how do you support your habit really.... I mean baking, and practicing all takes money, do you set aside a baking budget?

 

Thank you all for your help and advise.

9 replies
cakebaby2 Posted 6 Jan 2015 , 7:47pm
post #2 of 10

I'm a great believer in selling home made viagra outside nursing homes to support my habit.

Once the oldies have tried it, I up the price.

Alternatively since this is you just starting out you could buy cake dummies and practice decorating them, cleaning them off and reusing them until you are really happy with your skills.

as for the actual baking just keep making cakes and eating the evidence with your friends and family.

Good luck x

Gingerlocks Posted 6 Jan 2015 , 7:54pm
post #3 of 10

In my experience it is very easy to go out and blow a ton of money on all the wrong things in the beginning, and I think there is a tendency to do that for a lot of people. A set budget is probably the way to go, and the fact that you recognized that, instead of going out and buying a ton of fancy molds is a good thing in my opinion. 

 

Its not about having everything all at once, but having the great essentials to make a beautiful cake. Sure having lots of molds and stencils are great, but if you can't make a perfectly level cake then there really isn't a point. 

 

Set a budget of what you realistically can afford every month and buy the best essentials you can, such as; a good bench scrapper, an Agbay (or another leveler), or a good stand mixer etc..and go from there. 

4BIDDENSWEETS Posted 6 Jan 2015 , 8:33pm
post #4 of 10

If you had a list id absolute essentials that you would get starting out what would they be?

 

I already have a Kitchen Aid 6qt Stand Mixer

FinerThingsB Posted 6 Jan 2015 , 10:26pm
post #5 of 10

For essential things I'd say:

- A set of fondant tools

- Smoothie straws for supporting stacked cakes

- Several good icing tips

- Icing bags

- Fondant smoother

- Food coloring

- Rolling pin

- A set of cookie cutters of at least squares and circles

- Paint brushes (I use them all the time to color stuff and stick fondant to fondant)

 

And lots of patience :)

Gingerlocks Posted 7 Jan 2015 , 4:08am
post #6 of 10

A few of the thing's I would consider essential are; an excellent bench scrapper, a high end leveler, good quality pans, both bake even strips and a good flower nail, a nice smooth and sturdy turn table, a good set of icing spatulas, and having a solid set of go to recipes (either bought or tried and tested). 

mattyeatscakes Posted 7 Jan 2015 , 5:34am
post #7 of 10

A

Original message sent by cakebaby2

I'm a great believer in selling home made viagra outside nursing homes to support my habit. Once the oldies have tried it, I up the price. Alternatively since this is you just starting out you could buy cake dummies and practice decorating them, cleaning them off and reusing them until you are really happy with your skills. as for the actual baking just keep making cakes and eating the evidence with your friends and family. Good luck x

Did you really just type viagra?? Did i miss something?!

Snowflakebunny23 Posted 7 Jan 2015 , 10:09am
post #8 of 10

The only thing I would say is that if money is tight, you can save a lot of money (but not time) by using 'old fashioned' techniques for some things (like the tooth-pick technique)...particularly cake levellers.  I always did that until November when I bit the bullet and bought an Agbay...don't get me wrong...I LOVE it and wouldn't trade it now ever, but I wouldn't say it is an essential.  My most used tools are my rolling pin (big one), smoothers, small offset spatula, bench scraper, puff containing cornflour and precision knife.  99% of cutters can be replaced with a knife.  It will take longer, but again, if money is tight, it can be done.  I started decorating in my free time when I was a student and was completely broke so did everything the cheapest way, not necessarily the most efficient!  Now, I go the other way because my time is more valuable but depends on the situation.  I'd also ask what type of cakes you like and want to do?  While there are the basics for all cakes, there's no point in investing in a whole load of expensive petal cutters and veiners if you don't particularly like/want to make sugar flowers!  But, i would say always buy good quality tools.  You may be able to get some stuff cheaper (fondant tools are a good example) but the chances are, you will have to replace them.  I bought a cheap set years ago and the ball tool especially has a seam along the middle meaning it tears thin gumpaste...and had to be replaced.  Grr.  Good luck and enjoy! x

cakebaby2 Posted 7 Jan 2015 , 12:51pm
post #9 of 10

Quote:

Originally Posted by mattyeatscakes 


Did you really just type viagra?? Did i miss something?!
mattyeatscakes Posted 7 Jan 2015 , 6:07pm
post #10 of 10

A

Original message sent by cakebaby2

Hi Matty, yes I did. My first thoughts were inspired by the words "habit" and "pay for" which naturally led me down the "how to" path. My own advancing years, interests and financial necessity took me to the logical conclusion involving black pepper a morter and pestle some fennel seeds and a "can do" attitude plus time on my hands. Hope I've cleared that up, I'm a terrible one for overthinking a situation x

Now i get your logic! Sorry, i thought it was a typo! English isn't my first language.. Hehehe thanks for explaining that very well! :)

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