Mixing Dry And Wet Ingredients: Slow/longer Or Fast/shorter?

Decorating By THearst Updated 23 Dec 2014 , 9:23pm by julia1812

THearst Posted 23 Dec 2014 , 5:05am
post #1 of 4

Hello all,

 

When mixing my dry and wet ingredients, there seem to be only two ways to get the ingredients fully incorporated without "overmixing." I can either beat on low speed for about 1-2 minutes or on medium/high speed for 30 seconds.

 

I am conscious of not overmixing, so I'd like to know which of these two options is preferred. Does this depend on the ingredients?

 

Any insight would be much appreciated. Thanks!

3 replies
julia1812 Posted 23 Dec 2014 , 5:13am
post #2 of 4

AIt depends on the ingredients I would say. If I have my eggs beat nicely to peaks, I don't want to destroy the air bubbles, so I fold in the dry ingredients slowly and carefully. Any cake that should be fluffy and light is treated like that.

THearst Posted 23 Dec 2014 , 6:27pm
post #3 of 4

Quote:

Originally Posted by julia1812 

It depends on the ingredients I would say. If I have my eggs beat nicely to peaks, I don't want to destroy the air bubbles, so I fold in the dry ingredients slowly and carefully. Any cake that should be fluffy and light is treated like that.

 

What do you think for cakes that should be dense? (e.g. red velvet, chocolate, etc.)

julia1812 Posted 23 Dec 2014 , 9:23pm
post #4 of 4

AFrom my experience it always turns out nicer if I add them on a lower setting. But yes of course, if you want a dense cake, you don't have to worry about air pockets braking so much. I always want to make sure that they are fully incorporated. Never timed how long that takes, but I reckon for a chocolate cake about a minute, although I alter milk with melted butter and flour when I add them to my chocolate / egg mix.

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