Hamster Hair??? How To "scrape" Hair Texture Into Sugar Paste Or Fondant.

Decorating By emarcomd Updated 31 Dec 2014 , 9:05pm by -K8memphis

emarcomd Posted 20 Dec 2014 , 2:39am
post #1 of 17

So my nephew adopted himself a little hamster which he named "Cannoli".    

 

He's got a Christmas birthday so I thought I'd make a cake with a hamster topper, and I found this photo online, and it's blowing my mind.

 

Yes, I can tell that they "scraped" the texture.  It looks too fine to be a fork that they used, so perhaps I'll just tape some safety pins together.

 

If you look closer, you'll see how intricate that hair is... it's actually... I don't know... scraped and then... scraped again?

 

 

How in heavens did this person get such a texture?    And can folks tell if this was airbrushed, painted on, colored fondant or.... oh my, I don't even know!

16 replies
-K8memphis Posted 20 Dec 2014 , 9:41am
post #2 of 17

Ayes it does look double 'scraped' -- is it ceramic maybe? but anyway my thought is scrape #1 was randomly rolled over the surface looks like the fine thread of a tiny screw --

then scrape #2 could yes like you said just be from a pin but you could get that effect with one fine tipped pin --

i see me in times past trying to put together a device like you said and getting frustrated and spending more time doing that than it took to just use one needle to what i needed to do -- maybe you'll do better that way but just a heads up in the wee hours of the saturday before christmas --

what a sweet project -- best to you, the special nephew and the lively italian pastry

-K8memphis Posted 20 Dec 2014 , 9:42am
post #3 of 17

Aand yes color applied in layers with either brush or airbrush

emarcomd Posted 20 Dec 2014 , 9:21pm
post #4 of 17

thank you!

Magic Mouthfuls Posted 20 Dec 2014 , 10:37pm
post #5 of 17

What about scraping with a brand new toothbrush?  Or maybe a brand new thinly toothed comb like a lice/nit comb?  Then you would get many hairlines per scraping

makeherabaker Posted 21 Dec 2014 , 12:26am
post #6 of 17

The material used is 

 

Quote:

 Our cake toppers are made with 100% polyresin. Polyresin is a resin compound generally used for statues, figurines, and decorative furniture. It is a sturdy material that can be intricately molded, allowing a great level of detail with consistent texture. Additives can be incorporated into the compound to enhance the material's strength, reduce its weight, add heat stability, decorative effects, and so on. Polyresin is also compatible with a large range of different finishes, including paint and metallic finishes, which is why many decorative pieces are made from this material. Walk into any Hallmark store and find the majority of the figurines are created in this same material.

costumeczar Posted 21 Dec 2014 , 5:24pm
post #7 of 17

Go get a flea comb with metal teeth, They're really close together and will give you a fine texture like that.

BarbVanHorn Posted 21 Dec 2014 , 5:37pm
post #8 of 17

AI have this wonderful limitless tool that does a BUNCH of different effects. It is a gum stimulator that you find in the toothbrush isle. It has a soft rubber pointed tip you can use to scrape lines, mash tiny indentions, push tiny indentions, remove tiny scraps from edges... The list goes on and on! It is one of my favorite tools that I seem to use on every single cake in one way or another.

costumeczar Posted 21 Dec 2014 , 8:49pm
post #9 of 17

Quote:

Originally Posted by BarbVanHorn 

I have this wonderful limitless tool that does a BUNCH of different effects. It is a gum stimulator that you find in the toothbrush isle. It has a soft rubber pointed tip you can use to scrape lines, mash tiny indentions, push tiny indentions, remove tiny scraps from edges... The list goes on and on! It is one of my favorite tools that I seem to use on every single cake in one way or another.


That would work really well too...They have sculpting tools that are similar so why not.

emarcomd Posted 22 Dec 2014 , 4:06pm
post #10 of 17

Hmmmm.....  perhaps that it's clay makes the difference...

 

 

...since I'm constantly swearing that I'll floss, yet never do, maybe I'll invest in one of those "gum stimulators!"

emarcomd Posted 22 Dec 2014 , 4:06pm
post #11 of 17

Thanks everyone for the suggestions!

emarcomd Posted 22 Dec 2014 , 4:10pm
post #12 of 17

Quote:

Originally Posted by -K8memphis 


i see me in times past trying to put together a device like you said and getting frustrated and spending more time doing that than it took to just use one needle to what i needed to do -- 

 

 

THAT IS ME **EXACTLY**!!!   Spending ten hours creating a tool to make the  project "go faster"....

BarbVanHorn Posted 30 Dec 2014 , 7:21pm
post #13 of 17
emarcomd Posted 31 Dec 2014 , 1:14am
post #14 of 17

Thanks!  I'll check it out!

shanter Posted 31 Dec 2014 , 7:41pm
post #15 of 17

What does Cannoli look like? Different hamsters have a bunch of different "hair styles." For example, there's the one in my avatar. :lol: hahaha

emarcomd Posted 31 Dec 2014 , 8:29pm
post #16 of 17

This is Cannoli in real life....

 

 

 

and this is what he wound up looking like!

 

-K8memphis Posted 31 Dec 2014 , 9:05pm
post #17 of 17

oh you did a great job -- and he's putting the star on the tree -- too cool -- love it -- bet your nephew was thrilled

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