Bulging In The Middle And Holes In My Mmf

Decorating By rociodbb Updated 8 Dec 2014 , 4:21am by rociodbb

rociodbb Posted 2 Dec 2014 , 12:31pm
post #1 of 19


Hello everyone,

I still have problems of bulging in the middle of my cake. Please see picture. This has a buttercream and oreos filling which was really stiff, and I didn´t get it close to the edges. No idea why I still get the bulge!!!

 

Also, made MMF, knead very well, let it rest for a couple of days, colored, let it rest overnight. When I rolled it out, I got tiny (and some not so tiny) holes. The look was not bad,since it was supposed to resemble grass, and it didn´t have to be perfectly smooth, but it worries me that I have this problem with MMF all the time.


I need all the input you can give me, please!!

Thanks in advance!

18 replies
remnant3333 Posted 2 Dec 2014 , 12:57pm
post #2 of 19

Your cake still looks cute despite the bulging. I have never done fondant so I would not have any idea why it is bulging. Hang in there. I am sure someone here can give you a more defined answer as to why. I love the fence and the little horsey on top of cake. Very cute!!

ropalma Posted 2 Dec 2014 , 4:21pm
post #3 of 19

When you put the top layer did you let the cake rest.  There are a lot of threads about bulging here but the fondant is heavy once you place it on the cake.  So a method used is,once you place the top layer, place a heavy book or some suggest a floor tile on top.  This will resemble the weight of the fondant.  At that point if the filling bulges out you can smooth it before covering the cake.  On the holes in the fondant, you probably need to knead it a bit more.  When you paint with dark colors it changes the texture of the fondant.  For dark colors I use candy melts with the melted marshmallows.  This colors the fondant and you only need to use very little gel color.

Edible Art Co Posted 2 Dec 2014 , 4:36pm
post #4 of 19

Bulging can happen when there hasn't been enough time between baking the layers and putting them on top of each other. Let them completely cool before assembling them, they need the time to firm up a little. This helps prevent them getting compressed when you add layers on top of them. You could also try stacking/filling them in the cake tin. HTH 

rociodbb Posted 2 Dec 2014 , 6:21pm
post #5 of 19

Quote:

Originally Posted by ropalma 
 

When you put the top layer did you let the cake rest.  There are a lot of threads about bulging here but the fondant is heavy once you place it on the cake.  So a method used is,once you place the top layer, place a heavy book or some suggest a floor tile on top.  This will resemble the weight of the fondant.  At that point if the filling bulges out you can smooth it before covering the cake.  On the holes in the fondant, you probably need to knead it a bit more.  When you paint with dark colors it changes the texture of the fondant.  For dark colors I use candy melts with the melted marshmallows.  This colors the fondant and you only need to use very little gel color.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Edible Art Co 
 

Bulging can happen when there hasn't been enough time between baking the layers and putting them on top of each other. Let them completely cool before assembling them, they need the time to firm up a little. This helps prevent them getting compressed when you add layers on top of them. You could also try stacking/filling them in the cake tin. HTH 

 

Thanks for your answers! I did not put any weight on top of the cake. Honestly, I forgot, but I did do this with my previous cake and it ended up bulging anyway. The cake rested overnight in the fridge after baking, then rested again overnight after filling and crumb coating. I do the inverted method for covering with buttercream before my fondant, and I leave it to rest overnight. I took the cake out of the fridge while I rolled my fondant out, covered and started decorating. Buttercream underneath seemed VERY soft to the touch, although I use a crusting buttercream, always adding a tiny bit more powdered sugar than the recipe calls for. I only saw bulging the following morning (delivery day!). Could it still be possible if I stack/fill the cake in the tin that once I take it out, the bulge will appear? My cake pan is 3in, but with the filling it rises to 3.5in or so, would that be an issue?

 

I will try to knead more the fondant. I used a generous amount of crisco to avoid stickiness and also a bit of glycerine to help with elasticity. It behaved well, except for the tiny holes. I never thought about the candy melts in the marshmallows! What step would I add them in? Will they melt alright?

 

thanks for helping me! and for the compliments too :)

Paper Icing Posted 2 Dec 2014 , 6:36pm
post #6 of 19

AAdorable creation! Your cake is bulging because there is too much filling and it got too warm. You can try a dam of fondant instead of buttercream to stop the slide of filling that creates the bulge.Also, chill the cake tiers after the buttercream step.

ropalma Posted 2 Dec 2014 , 6:45pm
post #7 of 19

With crusting buttercream I do not put it in the fridge after I buttercream.  I leave it outside to crust overnight.  I read in some of the posts that while the cake is refrigerated it will not settle since the cold will keep the buttercream stiff.  That is probably why it bulges anyway after you take it out of the fridge.  Once you bring it out of the fridge it starts condensation as soon as the fondant hits it.  If you leave it out to keep room temperature overnight then when you put the fondant on there is no temperature change.  Honestly I have avoided the buttercream all together and have gone to ganache.  It makes a much stronger base and I have eliminated the bulge issue.  The candy melts:  Melt candy melts and marshmallows separately, add the candy melts to the marshmallow, additional color as needed, stir it all together.  Use this then to mix with the powdered sugar.  Start with 1/2 cup of candy melts.

 

bonniekaye Posted 2 Dec 2014 , 8:05pm
post #8 of 19

This is how I handle the bulging sides issue. I fill my cakes as usual, and I don't worry about a buttercream dam. I extend the filling frosting to the edge of each torted layer of cake. My 2 baked cake layers are cut 1" high, giving me 4 layers of cake.  When the cake is stacked, I run a coat of buttercream around the side of the cake. This fills in all the gaps and works any filling buttercream from each layer into the buttercream on the sides. My goal is to use this layer of buttercream to fill in and to give me straight sides. It is not a thick coat, and the top and bottom of the cake barely has any frosting. This is basically a crumb coat.

 

Put the cake in the fridge so the frosting can firm up a bit.

 

In the meantime, I melt some white almond bark. This is like white chocolate chips, but it comes in a large bar. You can find this in the baking isle at the grocery store. It just takes a few minutes to melt the almond bar, and I put it in the microwave for 1 minute at a time. You can also thin it by adding a small amount of shortening.

 

With your almond bar melted, apply it to the sides of your cold cake. I use a plastic bowl scraper (the one that is straight on one side and slightly curved on the other side) to apply the melted bar to the side of the cake. You do not need to put on a thick coat. The goal is to apply it just to the sides and all around the cake evenly. Think of this as a white bandage around your cake. Remember, you do not need this to be a thick coat. Now, put the cake in the fridge for a few minutes and the white bar will firm up.

 

Take the cake out of the fridge and apply your buttercream to the sides and top. You don't need a thick coat of frosting. Hint: If you have an Agbay or other cake leveler you can use it to level the frosting on top. Just set the leveler to the height you need and push it through the frosting, removing the excess.

 

I put the cake back in the fridge so the final coat of frosting can firm up.

 

With my fondant rolled out, I take the cake out of the fridge and cover it. The condensation from the cake is usually enough for the fondant to stick to the frosting.

 

I do not use marshmallow fondant. I make my fondant in 40 pound batches. I have recently been using Michelle Fosters fondant recipe and have had great success with it.

 

When my cake is completely finished and decorated, I take a very fine pin and poke hole through out the fondant. I do this is areas where there is a decoration so the little pin hole does not show. This helps any moisture trapped in the cake to escape, thus, no more cake blowouts. 

 

I do a lot of cakes and this method is very quick, once you get the hang of it.

 

Hope this helps.

rociodbb Posted 2 Dec 2014 , 8:28pm
post #9 of 19

AThanks again! I will start leaving outside after buttercream and see if it helps! I usually don't use a lot of filling, but I look at some cake pictures with a thick filling with a tiny bit of envy, because I would like to have more than 1millimiter of filling but then my problem is bulging. I offer ganache to my costumers, but most prefer buttercream. On that note, my only cake with ganache was a disaster because the fondant wouldn't stick to the ganache. I read I should get it moist, so I did and then the ganache was dissolving! Truly a disaster! I know I should keep practicing, but it's not cheap to do so, and besides the pounds keep piling up in our bellies and thighs in my home! Anyway, thank you VERY mugh for your input!!

rociodbb Posted 2 Dec 2014 , 8:32pm
post #10 of 19

AThank you bonniekaye! I will try this method! Sounds like it could also help!!!

storestore Posted 3 Dec 2014 , 3:13am
post #11 of 19

AAre you sure this is an icing bulge you are dealing with? Could it be heavy fondant stretching out or falling that creates the bulge? Too much crisco in your fondant can make it heavy and greasy. It also can cause all of those tiny holes. I ditched the crisco and powdered sugar and got myself a fondant mat - non stick. Also, how thin do you roll your fondant? And what is your buttercream recipe?

rociodbb Posted 3 Dec 2014 , 3:20am
post #12 of 19

Great question! No, not sure is icing bulge...and actually I do have concerns of the fondant stretching, although it usually bulges right in the middle, where the filling is. I do have a fondant mat (The Mat), but when I´m coloring the fondant it gets really sticky and I need the crisco to prevent it from staying in my hands. I may be a little too fond of the crisco, but I do not use it for kneading on the counter, but for my hands. I only use the counter for rolling out the fondant.

 

I would say that I usually roll my fondant to 1/8 of a inch? I have the guide sticks, but I don´t use them for fondant since my rolling pin is not long enough.

 

My buttercream:

2 sticks butter (1C), 3-4C powdered sugar (I usually use all 4 and a bit more), 1tbsp vanilla, usually no more than 1tbsp milk.

 

The buttercream I used for this filling was mixed with crushed Oreos and I had added extra powdered sugar, maybe about 1/2 C more to have it stiffer.

 

Thank you!!!!

leah_s Posted 3 Dec 2014 , 3:46am
post #13 of 19

a cake will not settle in the fridge.  The fridge keep it cold and nothing moves.  During settling is where you want it to move if its going to move.

rociodbb Posted 3 Dec 2014 , 3:47am
post #14 of 19

thank you! Lesson learned! Hope it solves some of my problems! :)

Frank68 Posted 6 Dec 2014 , 8:16pm
post #15 of 19

I just wanted to provide my own experience with bulging which haunted me for some time. Despite torting, cooling, resting my cakes, I would still get a bulging problem that would appear several hours after the cake had been put together. Different types of fillings didn't seem to make a difference and dam or no dam did not get rid of the problem either.

 

In the end, it turned out that when I was dirty icing the cake, I wasn't pushing the filling in far enough between the layers to remove any trapped air at the edge of cakes. For the past 2-3 months, I've been forcing icing between the layers and it's gotten rid of the issue. Obviously you need to be careful that you don't press so hard against the cake that it breaks  (and take it easy towards the edges on square cakes) but it definitely needs a certain amount of pressure to ensure you've gotten filling into every nook and cranny. Air will escape over time and cause the bulges to appear (at least for me). 

 

 

Here's a cake that I've always had trouble with, double barrel hex cake , 8 inches high: 

 

http://www.sweettierscakery.com/#!Thanksgiving-Cake/zoom/c18h4/image_1b2k

 

 

Hope that helps,

Frank

MELROSE315 Posted 6 Dec 2014 , 8:37pm
post #16 of 19

AI too have suffered with all variations of bulge. I switched to covering cakes with modeling chocolate and never looked back. It's not for every cake, and it's expensive, but I know how it's going to turn out every time . Just an option.

mattyeatscakes Posted 7 Dec 2014 , 3:10am
post #17 of 19

AI don't know if it's just sheer dumb luck, but once i started using SMBC to ice and fill a cake, i have never had a blow out. No crumbcoating, no dam, no letting the cake settle overnight.. Just fill, ice, put in the fridge to harden the icing and then cover in fondant. And no bulge.. So maybe it's the type of frosting? And i've made both dense cakes and chiffon cakes..

morganchampagne Posted 7 Dec 2014 , 3:33am
post #18 of 19

A[quote name="mattyeatscakes" url="/t/780979/bulging-in-the-middle-and-holes-in-my-mmf#post_7565436"]I don't know if it's just sheer dumb luck, but once i started using SMBC to ice and fill a cake, i have never had a blow out. No crumbcoating, no dam, no letting the cake settle overnight.. Just fill, ice, put in the fridge to harden the icing and then cover in fondant. And no bulge.. So maybe it's the type of frosting? And i've made both dense cakes and chiffon cakes..

rociodbb Posted 8 Dec 2014 , 4:21am
post #19 of 19

Thank you! I will take that into account too!

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