Hiring Help

Business By MartieG Updated 20 Nov 2014 , 3:38am by MartieG

MartieG Posted 19 Nov 2014 , 7:17pm
post #1 of 14

Hello everyone,

 

I'm happy to report that business is expanding beyond what I can do by myself comfortably and still work fulltime.  I'm looking to take the business fulltime after the first of the year, but I'm in a bit of lurch right now and am bringing in someone to help bake.

 

My question to everyone is this... How do I figure out what to pay this part time baker? I realize the minimum wage is $7.25/hour in Texas, but is that what I should be paying? She'll just be baking and helping with the "grunt" work of making fondant, buttercream, fillings, etc.

 

I'm open to any an all suggestions and a quick response would be appreciated since she's starting this evening.

 

Thanks tons,

Martie

13 replies
-K8memphis Posted 19 Nov 2014 , 7:38pm
post #2 of 14

my first thought is that business usually tanks in january -- so be aware of that possibility -- slowly/slightly reviving for valentine's then just bumps along for a while -- first quarters are typically very/deathly slow --

 

minimum wage sounds pretty dang good to me

MartieG Posted 19 Nov 2014 , 7:42pm
post #3 of 14

Food for thought, K8memphis.  My intention was to market hard for valentine's day as a kickstart. I can always wait to jump off the 8-5 day job, but I'm dying a slow miserable death at it. LOL

 

Will keep your initial reaction in mind. =)  Any thoughts on what I should pay the help?

MartieG Posted 19 Nov 2014 , 7:43pm
post #4 of 14

Duplicate entry. Sorry.

TheNerdyBaker Posted 19 Nov 2014 , 9:42pm
post #5 of 14

Do you really want to pay someone the same rate that they can get at McDonalds for work that is not only more complex, but also much more sensitive?!

 

Imagine for a second that you hire some inexperienced kid who is still in high school to handle your oven and mix your recipes.  This kid has no background in baking, no eye for if a mix is done properly, no idea of when a cake may be ready to pull out and you are entrusting then with the majority of your production.  The very heart of your business.

 

I guess what I am trying to say is that in a professional bakery (in my opinion) nothing but dishes and the cleaning are considered 'grunt' work.  Absolutely everything else needs someone with at least some kind of mind for the craft of baking and production so for me I would pay someone at least two or more than minimum so I could weed out the bad a touch easier.  In California, a standard culinary/pastry job at the professional level begins at $12/hr.

MartieG Posted 19 Nov 2014 , 9:49pm
post #6 of 14


Very valid points, Nerdy. Thank you.

 

I failed to mention this woman is a friend of mine, in her 30s and quite the cook. I will certainly heed your words of wisdom.

 

Thank you again.

 

Martie

MimiFix Posted 19 Nov 2014 , 10:44pm
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by MartieG 
 

I'm in a bit of lurch right now and am bringing in someone to help bake... How do I figure out what to pay this part time baker? I realize the minimum wage is $7.25/hour in Texas, but is that what I should be paying? She'll just be baking and helping with the "grunt" work of making fondant, buttercream, fillings, etc.

 

Martie, in addition to @TheNerdyBaker's point, I'm fairly certain the law stipulates employers must pay at least minimum wage.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 19 Nov 2014 , 11:45pm
post #8 of 14

AShe starts tonight without knowing what she's getting paid?

This could be disastours for your friendship. She may be expecting something different than what you have planned.

Please remember that in addition to her hourly rate, you'll also be paying taxes!

oftheeicing Posted 20 Nov 2014 , 2:08am
post #9 of 14

AAlso, you need to check with your local zoning laws. I am in Pa with a valid business license to operate out of my home; however, the law states that I cannot hire anyone without first applying for and being approved for a zoning ordinance.

cakefat Posted 20 Nov 2014 , 2:25am
post #10 of 14

Quote:

Originally Posted by MartieG 
 

Hello everyone,

 

I'm happy to report that business is expanding beyond what I can do by myself comfortably and still work fulltime.  I'm looking to take the business fulltime after the first of the year, but I'm in a bit of lurch right now and am bringing in someone to help bake.

 

My question to everyone is this... How do I figure out what to pay this part time baker? I realize the minimum wage is $7.25/hour in Texas, but is that what I should be paying? She'll just be baking and helping with the "grunt" work of making fondant, buttercream, fillings, etc.

 

I'm open to any an all suggestions and a quick response would be appreciated since she's starting this evening.

 

Thanks tons,

Martie

 

You're employing someone and you question as to whether you have to pay the legal minimum? You want to pay her/him less than that? Not only is that illegal but you also have to pay employer taxes as well. Have you considered that?

 

There are labor laws for a reason. 

 

I can't imagine how a friendship withstands one person taking advantage of the other? 

stefkovic Posted 20 Nov 2014 , 2:36am
post #11 of 14

You get what you pay for. If you want good, dependable help you will have to pay more than 7.25. I am just a hobby baker, but good at what I do and would be insulted it offered only 7.25 and I think your friend might be too.

MartieG Posted 20 Nov 2014 , 3:08am
post #12 of 14

AObviously I'm still new at this whole business thing and misspoke. I was specifically looking for some input on some contract, as - needed help as I don't have the clientele to support a full time employee. Forgive my ignorance. I have offered $10 per hour and bringing her in when the work load calls for it. I have no intention of violating any labor laws and yes, I will pay any taxes necessary. I thought this was a friendly place to get my questions answered. I didn't expect the harsh responses. Lesson learned. Thank you for putting me in my place.

leah_s Posted 20 Nov 2014 , 3:33am
post #13 of 14

OK, you're over here in the Business Forum.  This is a puppies and rainbows free zone.  We're business people, are accustomed to answering questions in a matter of fact way, and because we're in busienss and deal with the (crazy) public, we've all got at least medium-thick skins over here.  No one was trying to hurt your feelings or "put you in your place."  

You're in business and business can be a tough thing.  I've owned my own biz since '92, and there have been ups and downs.  You'll find business people also move fast, 'cause we have to always be selling, baking, decorating, moving, moving, moving.  We pop in here to help others along the way.  You'll get good advice here, but we're a little more abrupt here than in the general forum where we *know* we're not dealing with business people.  

 

Hang in here and you'll get help and real world advice.

MartieG Posted 20 Nov 2014 , 3:38am
post #14 of 14

AThanks for that, Leah. Yep, I've got a lot to learn and the abrupt, direct, no candy coating here responses were taken in the vein they were given. It's all good. I appreciate the input, regardless. =)

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