Help With This Cake?

Decorating By storestore Updated 1 Dec 2014 , 8:08pm by ropalma

storestore Posted 10 Nov 2014 , 2:19pm
post #1 of 14

I'm still new to the cake business and I'm looking for advice on a cake before I come up with a quote for this customer. It's for a restaurant's Christmas party, it's supposed to feed 40 people and she wants it to look like the restaurant itself. I've attached the picture below. Using the wilton chart I came up with this: TWO 4x4x4 cakes beside each other for the lounge and a 10x10x4 for the restaurant part. I realize that usually party cakes are only a single layer but I just didn't think it would look good in a single layer. Any thoughts? Now, how would you go about decorating this. I thought I'd add a full layer of red fondant first and build out from there. I've never used modeling chocolate. Would that be a good idea for this project? The venue is WARM! It always is warm in there.

 

http://www.cranesteel.com/pictures/red_barn_restaurant-1.jpg

13 replies
MissCuteCupcakes Posted 10 Nov 2014 , 7:28pm
post #2 of 14

The cake sizes you chose seem like a great idea. You can even use 6x6 instead of the 4x4.

 

I think you should do a double layer and not a single layer, especially because the restaurant part has a curved design so you would need to do some cutting on the 10x10 to acheieve the desired look.

 

As for the modeling chocolate, I'm not sure because I never worked with it. So maybe someone can chime in and help you out

storestore Posted 22 Nov 2014 , 9:28pm
post #3 of 14

Hi, all. A little extra help needed here. Would modeling chocolate work for the white roof in this picture? I've never used modeling chocolate before. I worry that if I use fondant for the roof, the overhang will not hold it's shape.  

Edible Art Co Posted 22 Nov 2014 , 10:26pm
post #4 of 14

I haven't used modelling chocolate either, so I would stick with what I know and use fondant with a little added tylose powder. This will help it set firmer but still be fairly flexible. I would make the curve shape, lay it on something curved to 'set' a bit, then carve the cake top to match it. If you do this the day before you make the cake, as opposed to several days before, I think it will still be easy to cut. If you really want to try modelling chocolate, do an experiment (in a warm room) first before risking this project.

storestore Posted 23 Nov 2014 , 2:14am
post #5 of 14

Hey, good idea, Edible art. Thanks!

MBalaska Posted 23 Nov 2014 , 3:12am
post #6 of 14

Oh I hear it calling my name.......Modeling Chocolate!!!!!!  take a peek at @WickedGoodies  modeling chocolate stuff and give it a try one day.  It's wonderful stuff.  You can learn how to make it at home for a reasonable price, it tastes heavenly, it has a wonderful workability, it's easy to use...homemade modeling chocolate roses, SMBC & vanilla cupcakes.

These are  my very first homemade modeling chocolate roses.  molded these by hand with no cutters, just time spent playing with my food.  Do give it a go.

 

http://www.wickedgoodies.net/

 

http://www.wickedgoodies.net/2013/09/how-to-make-modeling-chocolate-video/

storestore Posted 23 Nov 2014 , 3:40am
post #7 of 14

AThanks, Alaska I will do that! Edible Art, would you recommend I put fondant walls on and then the curved roof? Or cover the whole cake like normal and then add the curved roof on top of that?

FioreCakes Posted 23 Nov 2014 , 5:35am
post #8 of 14

Modeling chocolate will melt at a temperature above 74 degrees. If its warm at the venue, modeling chocolate is not the way to go. 

Edible Art Co Posted 23 Nov 2014 , 10:48am
post #9 of 14

It depends on your skill with edges - if you wrap the fondant around the walls only, you will have to do neat edges at the corners of the building where the ends meet. Same if you 'panel' it (cut rectangles of fondant and apply one at a time). Do a search for 'icing square cakes', there are many pictorials that show how to achieve nice straight edges with tidy icing. If you're not feeling confident with this, then yes ice it all first and put the curve on top. It may be that when it comes to serving, they will just peel off the top layer, because in my experience one layer of icing just tastes better than two. So you have options, don't worry! Best of luck :smile:

julia1812 Posted 23 Nov 2014 , 11:03am
post #10 of 14

AI believe experiments should not be done when doing an order but at home in your spare time. So, that being said, I would not use modeling chocolate until you are comfortable with it. Besides, the high temperature might make it impossible to use anyway. Why don't you use fondant for the roof? Add tylose/cmc and it will hold it's shape.

storestore Posted 28 Nov 2014 , 1:59pm
post #11 of 14

One more question... First off thanks for being so very helpful! I think this might be a good time to try paneling the sides because the roof overhangs a little bit so the edges won't be visible anyways. One more question I have is: What on earth could I possibly use for the red lights above the word "Lounge". They are not visible in the pic above so I attached a link where they are visibile.  I am stumped! https://irs0.4sqi.net/img/general/600x600/2a3Wc9Wpi_hoQBGZ_pObhgvyXbj0McWKt68vqiCUcI8.jpg

Edible Art Co Posted 28 Nov 2014 , 3:51pm
post #12 of 14

How tall is the wall where the lights need to go? I'm trying to work out the size!

storestore Posted 30 Nov 2014 , 11:35pm
post #13 of 14

I measured it at 5 inches on the higher side and 2.75 inches on the lower side.

ropalma Posted 1 Dec 2014 , 8:08pm
post #14 of 14

Can you use some type of wire that you can bend and wrap with Fondant for the light post and then add the light made out of Fondant at the end.

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