Bringing Up Ingredients To Room Temperature

Decorating By Cakecrazy25 Updated 5 Nov 2014 , 5:40pm by Claire138

Cakecrazy25 Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 2:36pm
post #1 of 22

Morning everyone out there in cake land!

 

I'm wondering how professional bakers bring their cold products up to room temperature in a reasonable amount of time. I'm aware of letting stuff sit at room temperature, lukewarm oven, warm water for eggs, microwave, but how do bakers do it on a large scale. Is there some sort of appliance that can be used for this process, on the same line as a bread proofer?

 

I've search the internet and have come up with no answers. If anyone can shed some light on this, i'd appreciate it!!!

21 replies
leah_s Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 3:18pm
post #2 of 22

ASpeaking for myself, I don't bother. 50 years of baking, nearly 1k wedding cakes. Never had time for that nonsense - IMO

Cakecrazy25 Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 3:34pm
post #3 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s 

Speaking for myself, I don't bother.
50 years of baking, nearly 1k wedding cakes. Never had time for that nonsense - IMO

@leah_s I'm floored....really!?? My mouth is literally hanging open. Even for scratch recipes?

 

All this time i've been hearing how imperative it is for certain things to be at room temperature for better rise and blah blah blah. 

thecakewitch Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 3:51pm
post #4 of 22

AWhen I used to work in a production kitchen, no we don't let the butter or eggs come to room temp before we use it. Who got time for that? But then, we have big Hobart mixers for creaming and stuff. I only get to use a bread proofer during culinary school.

Cakecrazy25 Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 4:02pm
post #5 of 22

@

Quote:

Originally Posted by thecakewitch 

When I used to work in a production kitchen, no we don't let the butter or eggs come to room temp before we use it. Who got time for that? But then, we have big Hobart mixers for creaming and stuff. I only get to use a bread proofer during culinary school.

@thecakewitch wow. This is so amazing to me, it's such an eye opener! It makes me wonder what else i'm doing in vain. 8-OThanks for your feedback. 

IAmPamCakes Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 4:04pm
post #6 of 22

AWe don't use anything special either. When working in a commercial kitchen, efficiency is important. So, when I make a trip to the walk-in, I'll grab all 40 pounds of butter that I might need. Some of it sits out, some of it gets used right away. Commercial mixers are made to handle big, heavy loads of work, so cold butter is not an issue. That being said, there are a few recipes where temperature is important, and I work with properly temped ingredients. That is a commercial job though, and is different than a cake at home. A cake at home really should be made per recipe directions.

leah_s Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 4:28pm
post #7 of 22

When I was baking wedding cakes, I was mostly working with a 20qt Hobart mixer.  A couple extras minutes in that thing and everything's mixed just fine.  Even with the little 6 qt KAs, I just let the butter roll an extra minute and its fine.  And I ONLY bake from scratch.

When I was in full cake producton I never had time for nonsense.  three to seven wedding cakes a weekend.  Now that its not a full time job any more, I won't take the time for nonsense.

I did have to melt some butter to fold into Madeline batter last night.  But that only took 20 seconds in the microwave. . .
 

leah_s Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 4:30pm
post #8 of 22

Yaknow, even when I make macarons, for every recipe that swears by room temp infredients, I'll show you one that says it doesn't make a difference.  I honestly think that technique it most important.

Cakecrazy25 Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 4:35pm
post #9 of 22

@IAmPamCakes Got it. That makes sense. I can't wait to be in a commercial kitchen with a walk in full of butter in the near future ;-D. I also believe that efficiency is important. Right now i'm operating under the Cottage Law. I've seen videos where small bakeries that close late and open early mention letting their butter and eggs sit out over night in a cool place. I guess this is the route I will have to take until i'm in a commercial kitchen with more powerful equipment. This explains why I wasn't able to find any resources online regarding this matter.

 

Thanks again ladies for your wisdom! So helpful. 

Cakecrazy25 Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 4:41pm
post #10 of 22

@leah_s  i feel like a weight has been lifted off my shoulders. I've been racking my brain trying to figure out how to get my things to come up to room temperature in a commercial kitchen that charges me by the hour. Now I know i can pretty much just rock and roll. "I never had time for nonsense." <<<Haha I love it!!

morganchampagne Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 4:56pm
post #11 of 22

AYeah I bake from scratch and honestly the only thing I let come to room temp is butter and that's only cause I take it all out at one time for various purposes. The rest of if is cold. I'm not on a large scale just yet, but I worked at a bakery for 2 years and that's how we did it.

If you don't let the butter come up like Leah said just let it spin another minute. I don't sift either!! We did that in pastry school and I didn't think it was necessary so when I got on my own I stopped.

Cakecrazy25 Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 5:13pm
post #12 of 22

@morganchampagne Sifting is a pain. Usually I aerate by using a big whisk. The only time i have to sift is for my crusting buttercreams. I haven't found a way to get around that one yet. Wait....maybe I can put the confection sugar in the food processor to get rid of any lumps or bumps.  Hmmmm

MimiFix Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 6:52pm
post #13 of 22

Best thread EVER for sharing how real-world bakers simplify the job.

Cakecrazy25 Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 6:55pm
post #14 of 22

Quote:

Originally Posted by MimiFix 
 

Best thread EVER for sharing how real-world bakers simplify the job.

My thoughts exactly!!

Dayti Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 11:40pm
post #15 of 22

AI keep eggs in the fridge and take them out on trays of 30 at a time and leave at room temp. Butter stays out in 5kg blocks and if its too cold I "defrost" in the microwave when I go to use it if necessary. I sift 50lbs of flour into big plastic bins and never sift again (its for checking for bugs more than anything else). Icing sugar is never sifted, that stuff gets everywhere, and it takes forever. But mainly planning ahead what you might need the next day helps so you get stuff out the fridge before going home at night.

Cakecrazy25 Posted 5 Nov 2014 , 3:49pm
post #16 of 22

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dayti 

I keep eggs in the fridge and take them out on trays of 30 at a time and leave at room temp. Butter stays out in 5kg blocks and if its too cold I "defrost" in the microwave when I go to use it if necessary. I sift 50lbs of flour into big plastic bins and never sift again (its for checking for bugs more than anything else). Icing sugar is never sifted, that stuff gets everywhere, and it takes forever.
But mainly planning ahead what you might need the next day helps so you get stuff out the fridge before going home at night.

O my word!! Do you find bugs often? Do you have a machine to sift for you?

Dayti Posted 5 Nov 2014 , 4:28pm
post #17 of 22

I only found them once in the bakery 50lb sacks, and it was enough for me, I can do without the added protein thanks! It did happen to me at home once too though, the grossest thing ever, tiny little bugs that then turned into moths, ewwwww. I think they are called weevils, not sure. 

 

I don't have a machine, no. Just a bucket of fondant to sit on and a strong arm to sift with...

KLCCrafts Posted 5 Nov 2014 , 4:46pm
post #18 of 22

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dayti 
 

I only found them once in the bakery 50lb sacks, and it was enough for me, I can do without the added protein thanks! It did happen to me at home once too though, the grossest thing ever, tiny little bugs that then turned into moths, ewwwww. I think they are called weevils, not sure. 

 

I don't have a machine, no. Just a bucket of fondant to sit on and a strong arm to sift with...


I've heard that putting the flour in the freezer for a bit before opening the bag will kill any bugs.  I had flour beetles from a bag of grocery store flour once and it took forever to get rid of them in my kitchen.  Now I always put the flour in the freezer for a few days to make sure at least nothings going to live to multiply!

Cakecrazy25 Posted 5 Nov 2014 , 4:55pm
post #19 of 22

@Dayti Wow...that would freak me out. I've seen videos of people biting into candy bars and worms coming out. Supposedly The Food Defect Action Levels regulation/FDA allows a certain amount of bug content. The candy is safe to eat within the expiration date but after that the bugs manifest.

 

I'll never look at a candy bar or flour the same again 

leah_s Posted 5 Nov 2014 , 5:14pm
post #20 of 22

I will *never* forget a day in culinary school, when I looked over and saw a sweet young thing pushing veg shortening through a sifter.  I looked at her quizzically and ask what she was doing.  She responded with "The recipe says to sift ALL ingredients."  I said "You have to assume it means all DRY ingredients."  She said, "That's not what it says."

 

::sigh::

 

No one could convince her otherwise.

Cakecrazy25 Posted 5 Nov 2014 , 5:23pm
post #21 of 22

Bwhahaha, I wonder what she is doing now......

Claire138 Posted 5 Nov 2014 , 5:40pm
post #22 of 22

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cakecrazy25 
 

My thoughts exactly!!


Me too!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%