When All Else Fails...

Decorating By SweetNostalgia Updated 13 Nov 2014 , 6:24pm by SweetNostalgia

SweetNostalgia Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 12:33am
post #1 of 9

OK, so I have looked everywhere I could online, and I am desperate to figure out HOW to stack a cake like this. I know there are metal cake support systems available, but they have a center post. By looking at this photo, there is no center post being used. I hope someone on here can help me out- I thank you in advance!

 

8 replies
kakeladi Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 2:15am
post #2 of 9

I would say that tilted tier is a dummy cake.  All the others are level.

jchuck Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 2:38am
post #3 of 9

AMy guess, most likely stainless steel rod supports are used if the tilted cake is real cake. They would run from the bottom tier right up to the 3rd level tier. Would be screwed into the cake board. Fancy silver balls, most likely made of fondant or gumpaste, in between the tiers hide the rods. If kakeladi is correct in stating the tilted tier is a dummy cake, then only strong wooden dowels would be needed. I'm sure if you Googled how to support a Topsy Turvy cake, some tutorials would pop up. There may well be one here on CC.

Dayti Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 2:36pm
post #4 of 9

Quote:

Originally Posted by jchuck 

I'm sure if you Googled how to support a Topsy Turvy cake, some tutorials would pop up. There may well be one here on CC.

There aren't, I've looked and looked. I have to do a small version of Kaysie Lackey's birch tree crooked cake and there are NO instructions online! The only think I found is a photo of Colette Peters next to a whiteboard with a diagram of her support structure which is just about visible and you can guess the rest. Or, buy her book Cakes to Dream On where she goes into detail on crooked cakes (not to be confused with topsy turvy) - I haven't bought it yet but would def consider it since there is no other info out there.

jchuck Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 3:55pm
post #5 of 9

AHere is a picture of a cake structure that would fit the picture you posted. Hope this helps.

[IMG ALT=""]http://www.cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3301941/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

melmar02 Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 5:01pm
post #6 of 9

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dayti 
 

There aren't, I've looked and looked. I have to do a small version of Kaysie Lackey's birch tree crooked cake and there are NO instructions online! The only think I found is a photo of Colette Peters next to a whiteboard with a diagram of her support structure which is just about visible and you can guess the rest. Or, buy her book Cakes to Dream On where she goes into detail on crooked cakes (not to be confused with topsy turvy) - I haven't bought it yet but would def consider it since there is no other info out there.

 

Bronwen Webber has one on CalJava's website - she uses a stand.

 


kakeladi Posted 4 Nov 2014 , 10:19pm
post #7 of 9

jchuck that stand would not work for the pictured cake.  There is NO center doweling of any kind . 

costumeczar Posted 5 Nov 2014 , 1:06am
post #8 of 9

Based on how straight and level the tilted tier is compared to the other ones, which are saggy on the sides, I'd say that it's a dummy. The balls are covering two poles that go straight up to the plate over the tilted tier, and which are probably attached to it with hardware that makes it structured well enough to hold up the three tiers on top. I'd guess that it's a metal structure.

 

I looked up Kaysie Lackey birch bark cake and the structure that @jchuck posted would be what that one was done with, or something similar.

SweetNostalgia Posted 13 Nov 2014 , 6:24pm
post #9 of 9

Thank you everyone, I appreciate all of your help. The bride opted for a different design, since I could not find anyone to make me a stand that would work for this design. And since it does not have a center support dowel running through it, I knew that a lot of the other stands would not work either.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%