Glitter Frosting - How To Do It?

Decorating By rica827 Updated 20 Oct 2014 , 1:21am by maybenot

rica827 Posted 16 Oct 2014 , 4:11pm
post #1 of 10

Can anyone tell me how you could achieve this look for buttercream? I have a customer wanting the frosting to look exactly like the pictures below.

 

The top one actually looks photoshopped to me - how is that actually glowing?? haha

 

The bottom one I can see the silver dragees, which I have, but what is making the frosting glittery?

 

Thank you!

 

 

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 100

9 replies
Snowflakebunny23 Posted 16 Oct 2014 , 4:43pm
post #2 of 10

I'd say that they have been photo-shopped.  You may be able to get something close to the colour variation on the image at the top with an alcohol-based airbrush but I have yet to see a cake product which makes cakes 'glow'!  (although it would be cool).

 

The frosting looks like is has been covered in glitter... hopefully the edible variety.  Based on the shadows though on the bottom one, I'd say that they have held a white spotlight right above the cakes to take the pictures and bring out as much sparkle as possible...I don't think you would be able to get that level of bling on the edible glitters I have seen.  HTH x

julia1812 Posted 16 Oct 2014 , 5:16pm
post #3 of 10

AI'd say also edible glitter on top of the buttercream and good flash. The buttercream itself might be multicolored. You can fill your piping bag with different colors for BC. Depending on how you fill it, you get different effects. You can either layer it on top of each other or next to each other. To avoid that colors are touching each other in the bag and mixing, you can even fill your piping bag with piping bags of different colored BC... But in the picture it looks mixed up, I would say tortoise, pink and purple, a tsp each, filling the bag until full. Does that make sense?

ellavanilla Posted 16 Oct 2014 , 10:04pm
post #4 of 10

That looks like disco dust to me, which is technically edible, because it passes through the system without harm, but i don't think it's good eats. it's plastic and doesn't dissolve on the tongue, so your eaters will be feeling that sandy texture while they are eating it. Nothing edible will create that effect. 

 

of course, they are especially sparkly because of good photo editing, as well. 

 

i won't put it on anything because my philosophy is all natural and delicious. Disco dust is neither of those. There is a loooooooong thread on the subject pinned above.

Gingerlocks Posted 17 Oct 2014 , 4:44pm
post #5 of 10

I'm fairly confident the 1st picture is photo shopped...although, there truly are some "cake wizards" out there who pull off amazing things; so who knows I guess. 

 

 

But the second picture is definitely doable. Coloured butter cream, a glittered air brush colour, and then disco dust and coloured dagart's to finish. 

maybenot Posted 18 Oct 2014 , 10:58pm
post #6 of 10

Of course, you can't use disco dust on a cupcake because DISCO DUST IS PLASTIC GLITTER AND IS NOT FOR CONSUMPTION--it can get lodged in soft tissues [gums, guts, appendix, etc.] and may go on to wreak havoc for someone.  Never a good idea to adulterate food with plastic trash!

 

It's sad when confections are photo shopped because it does give the wrong impression of what can be done with real ingredients.

 

Edible glitter [gum arabic based] and/or sanding sugar mixed with edible luster dust will give a nice blingy look. 

 

I stay away from dragees, too,  because I worry about broken teeth as much as the non-edible metallic coating.  The U.S. Food and Drug Administration considers the metallic-finish dragées to be inedible, and they are sold with a notice that they are for decorative purposes only.

Gingerlocks Posted 19 Oct 2014 , 2:19am
post #7 of 10

Quote:

Originally Posted by maybenot 
 

Of course, you can't use disco dust on a cupcake because DISCO DUST IS PLASTIC GLITTER AND IS NOT FOR CONSUMPTION--it can get lodged in soft tissues [gums, guts, appendix, etc.] and may go on to wreak havoc for someone.  Never a good idea to adulterate food with plastic trash!

 

I stay away from dragees, too,  because I worry about broken teeth as much as the non-edible metallic coating.  The U.S. Food and Drug Administration considers the metallic-finish dragées to be inedible, and they are sold with a notice that they are for decorative purposes only.

I have never noticed any of these warnings on Wilton's edible glitter dust or on dagarts ("dragées") or even heard that it was not intended to be eaten before..?

Pastrybaglady Posted 19 Oct 2014 , 2:26am
post #8 of 10

AI was in a cake shop on Friday and they had all the dragees hanging behind the counter with a sign saying they have been determined inedible and should be considered as such.

Gingerlocks Posted 19 Oct 2014 , 3:32pm
post #9 of 10

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pastrybaglady 

I was in a cake shop on Friday and they had all the dragees hanging behind the counter with a sign saying they have been determined inedible and should be considered as such.

Really? Wow, I just did a wedding cake with ton's and ton's of them. There wasn't any warning about them when I bought them, but now I feel kind of uneasy about it..

maybenot Posted 20 Oct 2014 , 1:20am
post #10 of 10

Wilton's edible glitter is just that--edible--and it's made with gum arabic [which is edible].  Wilton's edible glitter is not "disco dust".

 

As for dragees:

 

"The U.S. Food and Drug Administration considers the metallic-finish dragées to be inedible, and they are sold with a notice that they are for decorative purposes only. Early in the 20th century, the silver finish may have contained mercury (it no longer does). The sale of these dragées was banned for some time. Although the metallic-finish dragées can be purchased in 49 U.S. states, they are no longer sold in California due to a 2003 lawsuit against several sellers.[10] However, in other countries (including the United Kingdom) they are classified as food items."

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