My 1St Tiered Cake For A 1St Birthday - Sagging!

Lounge By VKakes11 Updated 14 Oct 2014 , 10:55pm by VKakes11

VKakes11 Posted 12 Oct 2014 , 10:55pm
post #1 of 19

Don't get me wrong, I'm very proud of this cake given it was the very first time at a tiered, but - there was a lot of sagging and the cakes were sinking into the bottom tier of which it was on. It was either the fondant drooping or the buttercream underneath. I had supports under each tier (straws and then bamboo sticks). What did I do wrong? Any feedback would be greatly appreciated! Oh, and I used "chasey's buttercream" recipe from wilton, which used all butter, no shortening...

 

BEFORE delivery:

AFTER delivery (notice the sagging getting worse?):

 

18 replies
Norasmom Posted 12 Oct 2014 , 11:19pm
post #2 of 19

Wow, that's a beautiful cake design!

 

It looks like the top tiers were too heavy.  Did you put a weight on each tier to settle it before you put the cake together? There is a way to fix this, others on the forum will help…

VKakes11 Posted 12 Oct 2014 , 11:24pm
post #3 of 19

What kind of weight are we talking about? Something as heavy as the tier that will be placed on it? If so, put this kind of weight on it before putting the tier on? I'm a little confused! lol

Norasmom Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 1:36am
post #4 of 19

Here's a link to what helps "settle" a cake, hope it's helpful.

 

http://www.cakecentral.com/t/633571/my-newest-trick

denetteb Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 4:25am
post #5 of 19

Was each cake on it's own cardboard round?

oftheeicing Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 8:08am
post #6 of 19

ABeautiful design!!! I had similar issues when I first started. What I have learned: 1. Let the cakes settle for a few hours at least or overnight with a weight on top. What I do is fill and crumb coat each cake individually and place a large ceramic tile on top and let it rest. 2. Make sure all of your supports are cut to the EXACT same length after your fondant is on. I cut them level with the top of my fondant layer. 3. Make sure you have enough dowels/supports to withstand the weight of the next tier. Hope this helps!

cakebaby2 Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 8:41am
post #7 of 19

That is one lovely cake, so well done you. Yes what everyone else says, the cakes should have been allowed to settle for a good few hours or overnight so that they didn't bulge before you covered in fondant. The straws and supports hold up the next tier so if they are equally spaced and cut to the exact size this wont happen again.

VKakes11 Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 12:37pm
post #8 of 19

AI did have cardboard under each cake. I've been seeing a lot of the tile method for weight since I've researched - I will try that, thank you! As far as the "dowels", I remember that some of mine were just below cake level, therefore maybe that could have been a reason for sinking? Also, do you think the all butter buttercream could have been melting under the fondant? It was a crusting buttercream and it was crusted when I applied the fondant, so I'm not sure why, if so, that would have melted? Do of you have good, stable buttercream recipes for going under fondant? Thanks for the feedback!

denetteb Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 1:01pm
post #9 of 19

If some of your dowels were just below cake level, that is probably  your problem.  The cardboard from the upper cake will press down until it is sitting on the dowels.  If the dowels were below the cake then the fondant and icing would have pushed out/down for the dowels to carry the weight of the upper layers.

cakebaby2 Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 6:09pm
post #10 of 19

So true, but I but please dont go down the "white veggie fat route" to make it "crust". I think it might be a support problem as thats what holds up the tiers above not the cake below x

VKakes11 Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 7:39pm
post #11 of 19

Quote:

Originally Posted by cakebaby2 
 

So true, but I but please dont go down the "white veggie fat route" to make it "crust". I think it might be a support problem as thats what holds up the tiers above not the cake below x

So, you're saying the buttercream wouldn't have caused the bottom tier to sag? I had the biggest problem with the bottom tier sagging and bulging.

cakebaby2 Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 7:55pm
post #12 of 19

No, if the buttercream was just that real proper ratio fat to sugar, well chilled, not too soft then no. Your support system be it straws dowels or even SPS is what holds up the cake, not the tiers below it.

If you crumb coat thinly allow your cakes to settle before icing and assembling they should be fine.

VKakes11 Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 11:41pm
post #13 of 19

Quote:

Originally Posted by cakebaby2 
 

No, if the buttercream was just that real proper ratio fat to sugar, well chilled, not too soft then no. Your support system be it straws dowels or even SPS is what holds up the cake, not the tiers below it.

If you crumb coat thinly allow your cakes to settle before icing and assembling they should be fine.

Thanks cakebaby, you've been a major help :)

VKakes11 Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 11:44pm
post #14 of 19

One more question - the cakes were real heavy, especially the jumbo cupcake. Does it matter that I did use straws? I used the common straw, which didn't seem too sturdy, but I heard it works, but does it REALLY work for all cakes, of all sizes is my question. Should I have maybe used a sturdier support?

denetteb Posted 14 Oct 2014 , 1:04pm
post #15 of 19

Most people are not using a common straw.  They are using bubble tea straws which are a thicker plastic and a larger diameter and therefore more sturdy than a straw you get with a soda.

cakebaby2 Posted 14 Oct 2014 , 1:40pm
post #16 of 19

Quote:

Originally Posted by denetteb 
 

Most people are not using a common straw.  They are using bubble tea straws which are a thicker plastic and a larger diameter and therefore more sturdy than a straw you get with a soda.

yes this, I should have stated that x

VKakes11 Posted 14 Oct 2014 , 5:59pm
post #17 of 19

Quote:

Originally Posted by cakebaby2 
 

yes this, I should have stated that x

Gotcha'! While I should have used common sense, I figured it would work -- I guess. Next time it's a bigger, thicker straw! ;)

birdies Posted 14 Oct 2014 , 7:41pm
post #18 of 19

Also, it looks like your base is too flimsy. A cake that size needs at least 4 or 5 stacked cardboard rounds, OR a wooden base, OR a thick foamcore base. It looks like you have maybe 2 cardboards stacked and that will cause the cake to be unstable. It is a very pretty cake, btw.

VKakes11 Posted 14 Oct 2014 , 10:55pm
post #19 of 19

Quote:

Originally Posted by birdies 
 

Also, it looks like your base is too flimsy. A cake that size needs at least 4 or 5 stacked cardboard rounds, OR a wooden base, OR a thick foamcore base. It looks like you have maybe 2 cardboards stacked and that will cause the cake to be unstable. It is a very pretty cake, btw.

I never thought of that, but you could be right! I had 3 stacked and the only reason I did that was because I couldn't find one at my local store anywhere and I didn't have much more time for supply shopping. Never enough time!

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