Smbc Help

Decorating By julia1812 Updated 24 Oct 2014 , 7:44pm by julia1812

julia1812 Posted 12 Oct 2014 , 6:24pm
post #1 of 26

AIs it possible to make SMBC without a thermometer? I read that you heat up granulated sugar and egg whites in double boiler until it's reaching 160F. But I don't have a candy thermometer (yet) and would love to try it out. How do I know that it's the right temperature? And what if I overheat it accidentally?

25 replies
costumeczar Posted 12 Oct 2014 , 6:40pm
post #2 of 26

I wouldn't try it. You have to make sure that it gets to the right temperature (I don't know if what you said is right, I always make IMBC and you take that up to about 245 degrees.) Guessing isn't going to be a good thing. They sell candy thermometers at the grocery store where they sell cake pans etc, and they're not expensive.

Cevamal Posted 12 Oct 2014 , 7:44pm
post #3 of 26

AShouldn't it be OK with a carton of pasteurized egg whites? Then you only have to heat them enough to dissolve the sugar, not to 160F.

morganchampagne Posted 12 Oct 2014 , 7:51pm
post #4 of 26

A

Original message sent by Cevamal

Shouldn't it be OK with a carton of pasteurized egg whites? Then you only have to heat them enough to dissolve the sugar, not to 160F.

You can do it like this. However not sure where you are, in our grocery store believe it or not the candy thermometers are cheaper than the carton egg whites

julia1812 Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 3:46am
post #5 of 26

AThanks you two! But believe it or not, they don't even know what a candy thermometer is, lol! Supply a is huuuge issue here :( I've ordered one which will hopefully arrive with a friend beginning of next month. But I'm a bit impassioned and would have loved to try smbc! So, the goal is to a) melt the sugar and b) kill salmonella in un-pasteurized eggs, right? Meaning if the eggs are okay I don't need to heat much and otherwise to...? I read everything from 115F to 160F...

costumeczar Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 10:57am
post #6 of 26

Quote:

Originally Posted by julia1812 

Thanks you two!
But believe it or not, they don't even know what a candy thermometer is, lol!
Supply a is huuuge issue here icon_sad.gif
I've ordered one which will hopefully arrive with a friend beginning of next month. But I'm a bit impassioned and would have loved to try smbc!
So, the goal is to a) melt the sugar and b) kill salmonella in un-pasteurized eggs, right? Meaning if the eggs are okay I don't need to heat much and otherwise to...? I read everything from 115F to 160F...


You want to make sure the sugar is heated enough to melt and kill the salmonella, right, but it's more about the sugar. If you've ever had grainy fudge because the person who made it said "I don't need a candy thermometer, I know when it's ready" then you'll know that no, they don't know when it's ready, and they do need a thermometer. You need to get it to about 150F for a little over a minute for salmonella purposes.

yortma Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 1:31pm
post #7 of 26

AI have made smbc with carton whites and it works, but I don't find it tastes quite as fresh (and I heat them to 160 anyway). I prefer fresh whites whenever possible. But will use them in a pinch if it will be chocolate, or some other addition that has its own strong flavor. While heating the sugar and whites I have tested by touch while also using a thermometer to have a back up plan (thinking I might somewhere somehow find myself without a thermometer someday) and have found that 160 degrees is just when it is too hot to stick my finger in for more than a split second. Disclaimer - everyone's fingers are different- 140 degrees is the minimum to pasteurize eggs, so aiming for 160 leaves a fair margin of safety. Maybe heat water in your oven to 160 and get a sense of what that feels like. Have fun - since I tried SMBC I rarely make anything else!

mattyeatscakes Posted 14 Oct 2014 , 3:22am
post #8 of 26

AI have been lucky! I only make SMBC (except for cream cheese frosting), but i do not own a thermometer. I "feel" the eggwhite, sugar mixture and make sure that there is no longer a grainy texture. Also, i use eggwhites from a carton as i do not make curds or flans so i have no use for extra eggyolks. So, from my own experience, it is doable :) goodluck!

MBalaska Posted 14 Oct 2014 , 3:27am
post #9 of 26

has anyone tried one of the laser point-and-shoot thermometers??  the prices have come down quite a bit.

Pastrybaglady Posted 14 Oct 2014 , 3:54am
post #10 of 26

MB, my husband has one he uses for work.  I will have to try it next time I make SMBC.  I wonder if the laser will go through the egg whites to the bottom of the pan... will report back later this week!

Rfisher Posted 14 Oct 2014 , 11:01pm
post #11 of 26

AOP, if you really want to try it out for yourself, not for an order... Look up Duff's french buttercream. Or some semblance to those 3 words. It's uncooked SMBC. Something else entirely if you drop off Duff..... Have fun and remember the ratios of egg white/sugar/butter are not set in stone. There's plenty o variations out there....

julia1812 Posted 15 Oct 2014 , 3:13am
post #12 of 26

AThanks you, Rfisher! Just looked it up. But that is - as you said - not an option if you make cakes for other people. Believe it or not, but our eggs are not pasteurized

yortma Posted 15 Oct 2014 , 12:56pm
post #13 of 26

Mine is 1.5 cups whites, 1.5 pounds unsalted butter (6 cubes) and 2 cups of sugar plus flavorings.  I store quart deli containers of unflavored SMBC in the freezer until needed.  I keep the cake in the refrigerator  during and after assembly  until an hour or two before serving (sometimes longer depending on circumstances) because I  want it to be softened when eaten. I usually don't refrigerate the cake if the SMBC is covered with fondant.  HTH

clare2582 Posted 15 Oct 2014 , 1:52pm
post #14 of 26

I used pasteurized egg whites (the kind in a carton) the last time I made SMBC, because I intended to serve it to more people than just my family.... and it took ALOT of whipping and cream of tartar to get those babies to do ANYTHING! 

 

Anyone else have that experience? 

cazza1 Posted 15 Oct 2014 , 2:15pm
post #15 of 26

I have a laser thermometer.  It is a lot of fun but I would not trust it for cooking.  I shoot temps around the house and outside.  It only measures the surface temp of things so in a pot it will measure the top surface, which can vary quite a bit from further down in the pot.  I did test it against my thermopen and my candy thermometer when I first got it.

julia1812 Posted 15 Oct 2014 , 3:35pm
post #16 of 26

AThanks! Yortma, that was my biggest worry actually because my fondant hates my fridge and I use lots of gum paste details too. Phew, relief! Claire2582, is cream of tartar a must? Every other smbc recipe has it. Read somewhere it can be substituted with white wine vinegar which has apparently the same effect...not sure about that. What do you say?

Cevamal Posted 15 Oct 2014 , 8:07pm
post #17 of 26

A

Original message sent by clare2582

I used pasteurized egg whites (the kind in a carton) the last time I made SMBC, because I intended to serve it to more people than just my family.... and it took ALOT of whipping and cream of tartar to get those babies to do ANYTHING! 

Anyone else have that experience? 

That's normal.

Have you tried the recipe posted here recently that doesn't call for whipping the egg whites? I used it recently and, to me, it's indistinguishable from the standard technique. I used carton whites in it, no cream of tartar.

If you can't find it let me know and I'll dig up the link.

clare2582 Posted 16 Oct 2014 , 1:10pm
post #18 of 26


I'd be interested to see that recipe, thanks.  They stayed at the "frothy" stage FOREVER... I just kept adding more and more Cream of Tartar until they started doing something - I'm a novice baker and it was just a little concerning for me.... that they'd never come together! 

MKC Posted 16 Oct 2014 , 9:47pm
post #20 of 26

Aread this article on egg whites and salmonella: http://www.incredibleegg.org/egg-facts/egg-safety/eggs-and-food-safety

MBalaska Posted 16 Oct 2014 , 11:19pm
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by MKC 

read this article on egg whites and salmonella: http://www.incredibleegg.org/egg-facts/egg-safety/eggs-and-food-safety

 

thanks @MKC.  that link connects to/ this page and it gives their recommendations on the cooking times and temps for whole eggs, egg whites & egg yolks. Informative.

 

http://www.incredibleegg.org/egg-facts/egg-safety/safe-food-handling-tips

yortma Posted 17 Oct 2014 , 12:39pm
post #22 of 26

Quote:

Wow, worth a try!  Thanks

yortma Posted 20 Oct 2014 , 3:14am
post #23 of 26

I tried The fool proof SMBC mentioned above, and it did work just fine.  It took a while to cool, and also took a while to come together after adding the butter.  i don't think it saves any time and may take longer to allow for cooling.  (Whipping the whites cools it fairly rapidly) but it saves an extra step. Also probably doesn't matter if a little yolk gets in the whites.  The final buttercream was a little less in volume than the traditional method, so there must be some volume maintained by whipping the whites.  It tastes the same, but haven't actually used it yet to see if it handles/holds up any differently.  

costumeczar Posted 20 Oct 2014 , 10:55am
post #24 of 26

AHere's a thought for you all to try if you're interested in experimenting. When I made IMBC last week I put the cooked sugar syrup into the meringue and let it spin a few minutes, then i took butter straight from the fridge and added it a tablespoon at a time to the hot (really warm, not hot) meringue. It cooled it down slowly and incorporated into a buttercream in about two minutes. I didn't lose volume in the meringue and it didn't turn to soup. If it had I would have just put it in the fridge to cool down, so no big deal, but i was done with the buttercream in about 5 minutes.

julia1812 Posted 20 Oct 2014 , 1:42pm
post #25 of 26

AThat's awesome

julia1812 Posted 24 Oct 2014 , 7:44pm
post #26 of 26

AOMG, I'm afraid I got hooked!!! So yummy, smooth and easy to make

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%