Will My Cake Fall Over?

Decorating By 1universe Updated 3 Oct 2014 , 4:07am by 1universe

1universe Posted 30 Sep 2014 , 3:13am
post #1 of 6

AYears ago, someone gifted me an extensive set of clear plastic cake stands/plates with scalloped edges and hollow center pillars/poles/tubes. Never used them because I never figured out just what to do with them. Recently, a friend showed me a cake she wanted, which is a double cascading staircase, using the very cake plates I have. My question is: are these stands sturdy enough to handle the weight of a real cake? Also, I don't feel confident that the single center pillar is enough to keep the elevated plate from toppling over WITH THE CAKE ON IT! This link shows the closest example of the type of cake stand I'm talking about. http://www.cakecentral.com/g/i/2331555/a/2332554/floating-tiers/ As you can see, the taller the center pole, the bigger my fear grows that the cake will fall over! Especially at the real possibility that guests may bump into the display table. When I look up the pieces I have, most vendors show it as a cupcake stand. I don't know the manufacturer of the plates that I have. Any advice from those with knowledge/experience with such stands would be appreciated. p.s. The center cake I intend to make is supposed to be 3 tiers, each on a divider plate, with A SINGLE PILLAR running through the bottom 2 cakes (a 12" and a 10"). Sorry I wasn't able to find a diagram.

5 replies
-K8memphis Posted 2 Oct 2014 , 4:44pm
post #2 of 6

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1universe 

Years ago, someone gifted me an extensive set of clear plastic cake stands/plates with scalloped edges and hollow center pillars/poles/tubes. Never used them because I never figured out just what to do with them. Recently, a friend showed me a cake she wanted, which is a double cascading staircase, using the very cake plates I have. My question is: are these stands sturdy enough to handle the weight of a real cake? Also, I don't feel confident that the single center pillar is enough to keep the elevated plate from toppling over WITH THE CAKE ON IT! This link shows the closest example of the type of cake stand I'm talking about.
http://www.cakecentral.com/g/i/2331555/a/2332554/floating-tiers/
As you can see, the taller the center pole, the bigger my fear grows that the cake will fall over! Especially at the real possibility that guests may bump into the display table.
When I look up the pieces I have, most vendors show it as a cupcake stand. I don't know the manufacturer of the plates that I have. Any advice from those with knowledge/experience with such stands would be appreciated.
p.s. The center cake I intend to make is supposed to be 3 tiers, each on a divider plate, with A SINGLE PILLAR running through the bottom 2 cakes (a 12" and a 10"). Sorry I wasn't able to find a diagram.

 

 

yes holds up fine -- the plate on the bottom needs to be as substantial/large as the plate the cake is sitting on-- they fit securely into the 'flange' built into each plate -- you should be able to tell that by putting some together -- you can't hover a 12" cake over a 6" plate -- has to be at least a 12' or 14' underneath there -- it's more dangley but the ones i've used are very secure -- it works fine 

-K8memphis Posted 2 Oct 2014 , 4:46pm
post #3 of 6

guests bumping the table is always a possibility for any cake -- a wicked good hit would take down a soup bowl -- it's just an accident -- rarely happens

cai0311 Posted 2 Oct 2014 , 6:34pm
post #4 of 6

AI am a bit confused...

Are you saying that cakes 1 and 2 (the two largest), and 4 and 5 (the two smallest cakes) will be displayed as shown in the link. But cake 3 (the middle cake in the display) will be a three tier cake?

If that is the case then I would tell the bride she has to have the 3 tier cake sitting on the stand and I will use my normal supports (it sounded like you might be trying to insert the stand into the cake from your post).

Knocking the cake over is a possibility at any wedding. If you are super worried then have the bottom tier of the three tier cake real and the rest fake. It will be much lighter for the stand to support.

kakeladi Posted 3 Oct 2014 , 3:09am
post #5 of 6

...........don't feel confident that the single center pillar is enough to keep the elevated plate from toppling over WITH THE CAKE ON IT!..............

 

I had a set like that.  Never had a problem.  IF you are not using all the pieces it does help a bit to put a *larger* plate on the bottom, the pole, then a smaller plate w/cake on it.  It's all about balance.  The larger the base the less chance of there being any problem.  Yes, most of the time using the top & bottom plate the same size is sufficient but it will give *you* more courage if you can get that bottom plate just one size larger :) 

1universe Posted 3 Oct 2014 , 4:07am
post #6 of 6

AYes kakeladi & k8memphis I will now proceed with the plates with confidence. Using the next larger plate for the bottom is genial. Let's keep our fingers crossed that we don't encounter any wicked

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