Frosting/icing/filling In Between Layers And On Top Of Cake????? How High Is Your Yours??????

Decorating By cakeymom Updated 3 Oct 2014 , 11:18pm by craftybanana

cakeymom Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 9:06pm
post #1 of 11

Approximately how high is your frosting/Icing/filling in between and on top of your cakes??  I am trying to determine if I am doing to much or too little.  Or does it depend on the cake.

 

My is about 1/4" in between and a 1/2" on top.

 

 

Cakeymom

10 replies
MBalaska Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 10:16pm
post #2 of 11

I love icing, so I put about 1/2 inch between 2 layers.

about 3/8 inch icing if it's 3 layers.

Probably close to 1/2 on top, until you start scraping it off to smooth it.

remember that I'm not in business, it may be different for the business bakers.

cakeymom Posted 30 Sep 2014 , 7:35pm
post #3 of 11

Thanks!

 

Anyone else care to share???

 

 

Cakeymom

Edible Art Co Posted 30 Sep 2014 , 8:06pm
post #4 of 11

I'm much the same as MBAlaska, the thing is I had a friend who thought she got a 'scraping' of filling on an average tasting cake from someone else... so I always make sure to slap it on because it's part of the yummy taste, don't be stingey! lol

Apti Posted 30 Sep 2014 , 8:27pm
post #5 of 11

Use whatever you want.  If you are a home baker, not a business, just go with whatever the most people seem to like the most.

 

Go to this link and scroll down until you see the photo of the cake slices with different fillings.  This will provide a visual of what a very experienced baker provides for her fillings:

 

http://www.wickedgoodies.net/

 

Here's another visual from another very experienced baker provides:

 

http://cateritsimple.blogspot.com/search/label/cake%20comb

 

and here's a Ron Ben Israel slice of cake:

 

http://nyccakegirl.com/2011/07/15/neatness-counts/

 

These  very successful, long-time business people have vastly different cake slices, but all are respected and admired.  It's up to you to choose your own format.   Good luck!

 

p.s.  I am a hobby baker and personally prefer the Wicked Goodies/Ron Ben Israel style of cake slices.  I love torting my cakes with my Agbay leveler, and mixing and matching the flavor profiles.

craftybanana Posted 30 Sep 2014 , 10:25pm
post #6 of 11

Quote:

Originally Posted by Apti 
 

Use whatever you want.  If you are a home baker, not a business, just go with whatever the most people seem to like the most.

 

Go to this link and scroll down until you see the photo of the cake slices with different fillings.  This will provide a visual of what a very experienced baker provides for her fillings:

 

http://www.wickedgoodies.net/

 

Here's another visual from another very experienced baker provides:

 

http://cateritsimple.blogspot.com/search/label/cake%20comb

 

and here's a Ron Ben Israel slice of cake:

 

http://nyccakegirl.com/2011/07/15/neatness-counts/

 

These  very successful, long-time business people have vastly different cake slices, but all are respected and admired.  It's up to you to choose your own format.   Good luck!

 

p.s.  I am a hobby baker and personally prefer the Wicked Goodies/Ron Ben Israel style of cake slices.  I love torting my cakes with my Agbay leveler, and mixing and matching the flavor profiles.


Wow, WickedGoodies really slathers on the filling! I'm glad you posted these, I was wondering how much filling other people put in their cakes as well. I'm used to just a hint of filling, grocery-store style. I saw her tutorial on how to fill and stack cakes, such a neat idea to use a deep pan!

Apti Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 4:27am
post #7 of 11

Just this weekend I made a birthday cake for my best friend of 35+ years.  She specifically requested a cake with LOTS AND LOTS AND LOTS OF FILLING! 

 

So, I made her a torted pound cake with strawberry swirl, and torted the layers and used Pastry Pride mixed with strawberry filling to make the filling layers almost as thick as the cake layers.  The reason I used the Pastry Pride "mousse" is because it holds up very well, even if it is super-thick.  She was happy.

cakebaby2 Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 1:56pm
post #8 of 11

Love that tip about filling in the pan, makes perfect sense.

craftybanana Posted 3 Oct 2014 , 6:32pm
post #9 of 11

I just bought a 9" spring form pan today, going to try it with that. I checked to see if my 9" pan would fit in it and it does! Might help me get an even filling layer this time.:D The husband on the other hand isn't going to like kitchen tomorrow hahaha! My excuse? I'm practicing for um...you know...the heck of it... :lol:

cakebaby2 Posted 3 Oct 2014 , 7:45pm
post #10 of 11

Way ahead of ya baby girl it works just fine. My only reservation would be giving the cake a chance to settle....cant help there as my son and I ate it tonight.

So great for neatness and uniformity but the jury is still out if it would hold up for transport as part of a stacked bunch of cakes x

craftybanana Posted 3 Oct 2014 , 11:17pm
post #11 of 11

Nice to know it works! :) I wouldn't dare transport a cake and expect it to be neat... lols. I took one to a club meeting and it slid so easily even with my careful driving. I didn't have any leftovers though. But that was before I discovered this site. I don't get to make desserts as often now that I'm not in a college club anymore (sweet stuff made the officer meetings go smoother, lols). I wouldn't transport it in the spring form pan though, I'd be afraid of someone cutting into the cake and ruining my pan (like my cousin did once to one of my good pans :cry:). If I let it settle overnight in the fridge, should be fine right? I'm thinking an oreo-based filling is a good tester... mmm

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