Up To How Many Tiers Should I Transport Stacked Without A Central Dowel?

Decorating By pastrymaniac Updated 30 Sep 2014 , 2:42am by kakeladi

pastrymaniac Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 1:53pm
post #1 of 19

Hi fellow cake decorators,

 

I would like to hear several opinions regarding how many tiers are you willing to transport for delivery without a central dowel?

 

My tiers are usually 5 inches high, ganached under the fondant, I glue my tiers with royal icing, use wooden dowels and sometimes I carry  some of them unassembled and finish assembly at the venue but I don´t like this method so much because some venues don´t have air conditioning (and it´s quite hot here) which means a cake that is less cold and or condensation issues or staff going around in your way.

 

So far I have transported a stacked 3 tier without a central dowel but  no more than that.

 

Thanks everyone

18 replies
-K8memphis Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 2:46pm
post #2 of 19

the biggest issue is the weight -- if you have nice strong reliable help to get more than two or three tiers in & out of your vehicle and though any and all obstacles on your way to the cake table -- stack it as high as you want -- but otherwise give yourself a break and adjust to stacking on site --

 

best to you

pastrymaniac Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 3:18pm
post #3 of 19

Thanks K8memphis, so if I have someone to help me carry the weight you don´t see a reason for me to freak out transporting a 4 or 5 tier already stacked with the tiers just glued with icing and no central dowel?

 

Sometimes I finish assembling at the venue but when I have to use more precise techniques like piping, painting, applying silver leaf with a bunch of staff running around I freak out a bit and some details around bottom edges of tiers you just can finish when the cake is stacked.

 

So you don´t think that a central dowel is mandatory for cakes with more than 3 tiers?

 

Thanks, cheers

thecakewitch Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 3:31pm
post #4 of 19

AI don't center dowel. I deliver fully assembled up to 4-5 tiers, as long as I or someone I trust (husband) can carry the weight of the cake. I want to be out of the venue as fast as I can. I use sps.

-K8memphis Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 3:31pm
post #5 of 19

about the only time i use center dowels is for topsy turvy cakes -- i've worked for places that never use boxes and delivered everything stacked but that was one person delivering --

 

i use boxes to deliver but i have no problem stacking and decorating on site -- and i'd recommend boxing the cake when two people are carrying it --

pastrymaniac Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 4:23pm
post #6 of 19

Thanks for the feedback K8memphis, I always deliver my cakes in boxes as well.

 

For instance let´s say you have to take your pasta machine to roll out a band of modelling paste to go around the bottom edge of a tier and emboss a pattern on it would you have no problem doing that at the venue? If I do that before hand I risk damaging the band when stacking because the cake arrives to the venue with the fondant less cold and I can make dents on it (I just hav a van with air con not a fridge van)... if I take the band already pre cut and in a roll inside a ziplock bag it will most likely stick to itself and be useless... it seems I have to either stop being shy at venues ;) or take cakes stacked if they are not too heavy.

 

Thanks for he tip thecakewitch, I have never used sps but  think I read you can only make cakes up to 5 inches high with that support system, is that true?

 

Cheers.

-K8memphis Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 4:32pm
post #7 of 19

i apply fondant ribbons before delivery with for example an 8" cake on another separate 10" board so that the ribbon will stay in place during delivery and i can slide the cake off the 10" board when i assemble -- the ribbon stays put -- for an imprinted ribbon i would bring the mold and some fondant to repair if necessary --

pastrymaniac Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 4:56pm
post #8 of 19

Thanks so much for the tips K8memphis, learning everyday thanks to personal effort, trial and error and tips from experienced cake decorators like you. Just about ten months since my first wedding cake ;)

 

Cheers 

thecakewitch Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 5:13pm
post #9 of 19

A

Original message sent by pastrymaniac

Thanks for the feedback [B]K8memphis[/B], I always deliver my cakes in boxes as well.

For instance let´s say you have to take your pasta machine to roll out a band of modelling paste to go around the bottom edge of a tier and emboss a pattern on it would you have no problem doing that at the venue? If I do that before hand I risk damaging the band when stacking because the cake arrives to the venue with the fondant less cold and I can make dents on it (I just hav a van with air con not a fridge van)... if I take the band already pre cut and in a roll inside a ziplock bag it will most likely stick to itself and be useless... it seems I have to either stop being shy at venues ;) or take cakes stacked if they are not too heavy.

Thanks for he tip [B]thecakewitch[/B], I have never used sps but  think I read you can only make cakes up to 5 inches high with that support system, is that true?

Cheers.

You mean double barrel? You always dowel for every 4"-5" of cake. If you mean tiers, you can definitely assemble and deliver as much tiers as you can carry.

pastrymaniac Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 5:29pm
post #10 of 19

Yes cakewitch I mean double barrel, do I use another SPS plate in the middle of the double barrel tier like I would with a regular cake board and dowels? Thanks.

thecakewitch Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 5:44pm
post #11 of 19

A

Original message sent by pastrymaniac

Yes cakewitch I mean double barrel, do I use another SPS plate in the middle of the double barrel tier like I would with a regular cake board and dowels? Thanks.

Yes. If my cake is 8", I would use a 7" or 6" plate in between the cakes.

pastrymaniac Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 5:54pm
post #12 of 19

Thanks cakewitch, you mean using a middle support board that is always less wide than the actual cake tier right?  

thecakewitch Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 5:56pm
post #13 of 19

AYes, it's what I would do.

cupadeecakes Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 6:47pm
post #14 of 19

I carry all my cakes stacked (as long as they will fit in my vehicle), but I center dowel any any cake 2+ tiers.  I use bubble tea straws and cardboard rounds for tier-to-tier support.

pastrymaniac Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 7:13pm
post #15 of 19

Hi cupadeecakes, thanks very muchfor your feedback and reply. Would you please mind checking this other thread I started regarding some issues I´ve been having with the central dowel method? Any tips and suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Many thanks.

 

Cheers.

 

http://www.cakecentral.com/t/779641/help-uneven-centering-of-cake-tiers-due-to-misplaced-central-dowel#post_7552461

-K8memphis Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 7:30pm
post #16 of 19

i just noticed you mentioned bringing your pasta machine -- i would just bring a rolling pin but i can't remember ever having to repair ribbon --

pastrymaniac Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 7:56pm
post #17 of 19

K8memphis I said that just to have even thickness all across the ribbon  if I was making it from scratch at the venue, and my pasta machine is a small portable one :), and just because it is much faster to roll it like that.

 

In some venues I almost have to beg to have a small table to finish the assembly of the cake or sometimes they keep asking me if I will still be too long...that´s why I like to take as much work done as possible for some places. For instance I have been told to finish assembling next to a kitchen stove which I obviously refused and two weeks ago I finished an assembly on a small computer desk in an office (and the venue was an hotel), with the computer there and all so I get a lot of strange venues.

 

Thanks.

-K8memphis Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 10:00pm
post #18 of 19

oh i start and complete assembly on the cake table -- sometimes i commandeer another (banquet) table in order to set up -- i just take what i need -- but one time i had to get a ladder to reach a top tier with a fountain under it in the middle of a huge table but i don't ask permission -- i arrive authorized ;)

kakeladi Posted 30 Sep 2014 , 2:42am
post #19 of 19

For years I never even heard of using a center dowel and transported cakes up to 3 tiers stacked.  But. for the most part when I was doing wedding cakes most were pillared, not stacked like they are today.

I think some of the main factors to consider are the roads one needs to travel on; the weather - there by the temp and how much time you have.  Do you have to run off to another delivery/appointment?  Can you take time to properly/nicely set up a cake?  How big are the tiers?  Not so much weight (yes, that's important) but how big is the base?  Are the tiers 2" apart or 4"?  ie: 6, 8, 10 vs. 12, 9, 6.  The latter will ride much better especially if it is on a 15 or 16" base board.  The 6,8,10 is a tall narrow tower and will easily tip over at the slightest dip in the road, quick stop or hard turn :(   

I can't remember for sure but I might have delivered this 4 tier all ready stacked - adding the flowers on site.  That would have been about a 1/2 hr - 45 min. drive over city streets.   http://www.cakecentral.com/g/i/28124/all-hand-made-red-gumpaste-roses-buttercream-iced-cake-w-real-ribbon-trim/album/84/flat/1

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