3 Tier Cake For 150?

Decorating By kakesalakim Updated 23 Dec 2014 , 4:17am by dee403

kakesalakim Posted 26 Sep 2014 , 3:10am
post #1 of 33

AI'm a bit worried that the cake my client ordered may not be big enough for their guest list. It will be a 6",10",& 14" cake and I plan on making the bottom layer 4 layers of cake with 3 layers of filling (which will be two 14" cakes split and filled and stacked). Do you think this will be enough servings for a guest list of 150?? If not should I suggest adding in another layer or just bake and decorate another cake and keep it for any additional needed servings??

32 replies
reginaherrin Posted 26 Sep 2014 , 3:36am
post #2 of 33

No this will not be enough for that amount of people.  If you go by party serving size the cake will only feed 103 people and if you go with wedding cake sizes then it will only feed 128 people.

kakesalakim Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 11:02am
post #3 of 33

AThanks so much. I told the customer I would add on another layer no charge and they seem okay with it. I also think with the design requested that the four tiers will look much better than the three.

reginaherrin Posted 29 Sep 2014 , 3:24pm
post #4 of 33

Why are you giving free cake away?  You wont be able to stay in business very long if you continue to do this.  Before you give quotes and take orders you need to know how many serving you can get from each size.  Check out this website to help you out. http://capitalconfectioners.com/cakulator/cakulator.cgi?pan=Round%2C+6%22&pan=Round%2C+8%22&pan=Round%2C+10%22&option=2&option=Select+Cakulator&chart=wiltonWedding2Inch&chart=Select+Chart&.defaults=Reset&.cgifields=pan

kakeladi Posted 30 Sep 2014 , 2:50am
post #5 of 33

You should be figuring the # of servings by the industry standard of 1x2x4 - as shown in all the Wilton books/yearbooks etc.  If the customer does not get all the servings in the cake style they pick out you can suggest adding a 'kitchen cake'.  This usually is a sheet cake that is 4" tall but only iced (and maybe bordered) - not decorated.  An 8x12 should give you 48 servings - more than enough to bring the #s more in line.

FioreCakes Posted 30 Sep 2014 , 3:48am
post #6 of 33

free of charge?! ::facepalm:::

reginaherrin Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 3:14am
post #7 of 33

Quote:

Originally Posted by FioreCakes 
 

free of charge?! ::facepalm:::


Totally what I was thinking.

kakesalakim Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 3:38am
post #8 of 33

AI'm surprised at the lack of support from some of these members. I'm sure you were in similar scenarios when you started off before. Try not to be so judgemental. I'd rather admit my faults and avoid additional price hikes and running people away. Just my opinion. Thanks.

reginaherrin Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 3:50am
post #9 of 33

I guess I'm confused, you are surprised that people aren't lending you support for your lack of business sense?  I'm not trying to be rude, it just seems crazy to me.  No sorry I've never been in this kind of situation by giving quotes out for cakes that I later realized where not the right size.  Before I started giving anyone prices I came up with a price list for each size cake and how many serving each cake would feed.  This was broken down into single tiered cake, 2 tiered, 3 tiered and on and on so that if someone came in and needed to feed X amount of people I could look at this chart and find the exact size cake I needed and know how much it would be.  I am sorry that you may think anyone is being harsh or not giving you support but I know, I myself, am dumbfounded to find someone giving something away for free that they work very hard for.  And I know that if you continue to do this you will not be in business very long, that's just a fact. 

kakesalakim Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 4:10am
post #10 of 33

AI guess we all have different ways of doing things... Is what it is. I do this cause I love it. Enough for me.

kakeladi Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 8:51am
post #11 of 33

What is a lack of support when you are told to learn how to judge how many servings a cake will give?  It's up to you - the *professional* to lead the customer.

Many brides order less cake than the # of invitations issued as something like 15% will not show; another 5 to 10% will not eat cake.  I have seen where a cake was served sooooo late that 95% of the people had already left the reception.  There are many reasons why a bride might order a smaller cake.  You can gently suggest ways to supplement a small main cake - one is the kitchen cake mentioned - and NO it is not given free - the # of servings is included in the total and charged for.

Some charge less per serving for a kitchen cake because there is less work by not decorating it.

cakebaby2 Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 8:58am
post #12 of 33

A free cake lady yippeeeeeeeeeeee!

Snowflakebunny23 Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 10:21am
post #13 of 33

Quote:

Originally Posted by kakeladi 
I have seen where a cake was served sooooo late that 95% of the people had already left the reception. 

That annoys me sooo much!  I made a cake for a friend's wedding recently - 4 tiers - and it was getting late and I hadn't see any of it and, knowing I made it, people were asking me where it was (like I knew!).  So, I went hunting and there was a single tray in the corner with crumbs on it.  Cake had been there.  I asked around the guests to see who had had cake (maybe i just missed it) and only about a quarter had actually had any of it!  So, I asked the staff what happened to the cake.  This thing served over 130 people in total and there were only about 60 there (the bride and groom wanted to keep extra for next year etc).  The response?  'well the cake often doesn't get eaten so we only cut a little bit to avoid wasting it' *facepalm*.  My response (as calmly as possible) "well 3/4 of the guests haven't had any yet so can you please cut some more!'  Turns out they had cut less than a fifth of the cake on first go and not bothered to re-fill it when the tray was empty:-(

 

I now ask the Bride and Groom if they want to take any away with them after (even if it is sponge) and if not, the delivery note contains instructions to serve ALL the cake.

 

Sorry, I know it's not really relevant but thought I'd share...

MimiFix Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 12:20pm
post #14 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakesalakim 

I'm surprised at the lack of support from some of these members.

 

Hon, you are getting support. You just don't recognize it. Stick around CC and continue asking questions. Some members are sugary sweet with answers that may or may not help. Also be ready to hear responses you think sound "harsh" or "blunt" or "rude" but can hold the keys to your success.

cakebaby2 Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 1:33pm
post #15 of 33

Quote:

Originally Posted by kakesalakim 

I guess we all have different ways of doing things... Is what it is. I do this cause I love it. Enough for me.

You have asked (on different threads) the most basic questions that would be covered in domestic science class...no shame in that. I came here looking for professional advice and i've been baking thirty plus years, but I'm not selling cakes and you are.

Listen to mimifix and the others who know what they are talking about...its free business advice x

AZCouture Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 2:35pm
post #16 of 33

AYes, pay attention to the stuff that probably aggravates you, it's probably the BEST advice out of all. Cause right now, you sound like the cheap cake down the street that aggravates the rest of us, trying to make a living the respectful way, the proper way, the professional way. We all learned from others to a point, and graciously accepting advice that questions our practices and makes us think is how we improve our businesses. Sweet, sugar coated replies that only encourage bad practices drive us into the ground. And the rest of us will keep on going, and another you will pop up shortly. Wash, rinse, repeat.

MimiFix Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 2:43pm
post #17 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

... the rest of us will keep on going, and another you will pop up shortly. Wash, rinse, repeat.

 

(This parts for us, right?) Love your pithy responses, AZ! 

-K8memphis Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 3:41pm
post #18 of 33

speak for yourselves, please -- count me out of 'us' re: post 16 & 17

 

thanks

akahoney Posted 3 Oct 2014 , 3:44pm
post #19 of 33

AIn this situation I would have done the same thing to make the customer happy if I was learning.. We all learn from our mistakes... on another note Who's counting cake slices for real at a wedding the bride is too busy enjoying her day!!

-K8memphis Posted 3 Oct 2014 , 4:22pm
post #20 of 33

i make the bride order the number of servings she wants to pay me for -- i explain how to arrive at the number by figuring in this and counting out that then she decides and tells me how many servings and i make the cake -- 

AZCouture Posted 3 Oct 2014 , 6:59pm
post #21 of 33

A

Original message sent by -K8memphis

speak for yourselves, please -- count me out of 'us' re: post 16 & 17

thanks

Right, because no doubt everyone immediately thought of you regarding a reply that you had nothing to do with.

-K8memphis Posted 3 Oct 2014 , 7:22pm
post #22 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakesalakim 

I'm a bit worried that the cake my client ordered may not be big enough for their guest list. It will be a 6",10",& 14" cake and I plan on making the bottom layer 4 layers of cake with 3 layers of filling (which will be two 14" cakes split and filled and stacked). Do you think this will be enough servings for a guest list of 150?? If not should I suggest adding in another layer or just bake and decorate another cake and keep it for any additional needed servings??

 

op, did you get your conundrum resolved? you can contact me through a private message if you prefer -- click on my name right there under the picture of my dog then click on 'sendPM'

 

best baking and best baking business to you

MimiFix Posted 3 Oct 2014 , 7:23pm
post #23 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis 

speak for yourselves, please -- count me out of 'us' re: post 16 & 17

thanks
Right, because no doubt everyone immediately thought of you regarding a reply that you had nothing to do with.

 

Yeah, sorry K8. I hadn't wanted to embarrass you by bringing it up again; but when I quoted AZ, I was talking to her (This parts for us, right?) Love your pithy responses, AZ! Your post #18 really surprised me. I'm so sorry for any confusion. 

FioreCakes Posted 4 Oct 2014 , 12:40am
post #24 of 33

Quote:

Originally Posted by akahoney 

In this situation I would have done the same thing to make the customer happy if I was learning.. We all learn from our mistakes... on another note Who's counting cake slices for real at a wedding the bride is too busy enjoying her day!!

 

 

ohhhhh right....who's counting? Until they run out of cake...and then guess who get's a nasty email? The decorator who misguided the cake size servings. Also in the future when the OP tries to charge more for the same size cake the customers are confused because now 150 slices costs more! The OP is setting herself up for headaches and business failure and the responses were to help. 

cakebaby2 Posted 4 Oct 2014 , 5:14am
post #25 of 33

Quote:

Originally Posted by akahoney 

In this situation I would have done the same thing to make the customer happy if I was learning.. We all learn from our mistakes... on another note Who's counting cake slices for real at a wedding the bride is too busy enjoying her day!!

Its those two little words "customer" and "learning" that dont sit too good in the same sentence

-K8memphis Posted 4 Oct 2014 , 2:50pm
post #26 of 33

why don't those words work well together? everyone is still learning whether there's customers or not -- i am still learning anyhow 40 years pro and over 50 baking years -- there's no body of work that needs to be accomplished -- for example a degree to be earned -- perhaps a class in sanitation maybe/maybe not-- before selling a cake or doing caking for the masses --caking is being allowed by ever increasing amounts of our municipalities as well as by every brand new spatula wielding cakist -- it's on the job training all the way for multitudes of bakers -- is it right is it wrong idk but it's certainly the way it is --

 

when they come here and ask it's an opportunity to get them through some of the 101 basic 'classes' 

cakebaby2 Posted 4 Oct 2014 , 3:29pm
post #27 of 33

Because K8 while everyone is still learning until the day they shuffle off if I want to buy a custom cake I want the pro to tell me how much cake I need for X amount of guests.

I want to know she has talent enough to know how to bake a 14" cake without sidling over here to ask about how to do it. May as well do it myself, at least it will be a fresh scratch cake?

I'm talking from a customer point of view here, as I've said before I'm a hobby baker who has shelled out in the past for expensive cakes., the one parting with the green stuff for a custom job.

There aren't a lot of customers making themselves known on here but I bet they lurk and are seriously put off by some of the most basic questions asked by people who then state they have already taken an order from some poor dupe.

The OP has several threads on" how to" including how much are bakeries charging to rent space in NY.

Phonebook , no, on here to ask that too.

That was what I meant, about those 2 little words not appearing together.

reginaherrin Posted 4 Oct 2014 , 3:33pm
post #28 of 33

K8, I think they mean when you know nothing about baking or decorating or just as important business and you are learning as you go (on paying customers) instead of learning all you can and then starting a business.  Everyone can certainly still learn and grow which is essential for a successful business but if you don't at least get the basics down you are setting yourself up for failure and you are going to upset a lot of customers.

-K8memphis Posted 4 Oct 2014 , 3:57pm
post #29 of 33

that is true and i getchas -- thank you -- and for teaching school and coding computers and being a doctor/nurse/dentist police man, fbi, lawyer you have to be credentialed -- to sell real estate -- to teach safety/first aid etc.but it's not required to do cake -- might it be smarter to stop the momentum and reject the orders and go hit the books -- maybe/maybe not -- there are all kinds of ways to do this --

 

i know a girl in business today who couldn't balance her books if her life depended on it -- she not only could not figure out her percentages -- even when you showed her the right way she was firmly convinced that her way was right -- otoh their are owners who couldn't pipe their way out of a thumb print cookie --

 

'the poor dupe' might be uncle joe wanting to support his favorite niece  -- idk who it is -- cakebaby, you would not be satisfied with op to do your cake -- no harm no foul there are plenty of peeps out there wanting a good deal first and a satisfactory cake second -- some brides don't even want cake at all and are upset they have to spend the money -- some brides buy 100 servings when it's a whole church 200+ guest list just because that's all they can afford and they don't care if they run out -- there's all kinds of customers -- they ain't all looking to spend $15 a serving for a boutique cake --

 

so for some personality types yes get all unruly ducks nailed in place first --for others no they don't operate that way -- there's not just one way to do this --

-K8memphis Posted 4 Oct 2014 , 3:59pm
post #30 of 33

we just had thee cutest bakery open here -- he had every duck feather in perfect harmony with the universe -- went belly up in 8 months

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