Teaching At A Local College

Business By mommyinaprilx2 Updated 13 Oct 2014 , 6:35pm by -K8memphis

mommyinaprilx2 Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 10:14pm
post #1 of 15

I am needing ideas for 6 weeks to last 2 hours long each.  I plan to do my first class as a learn how to make good cake icing for decorating, leveling cake, filling, icing cake, ect. What are some other good things to do? I have taught several times at other places and always seem to run out of things to do in our time slot. Hoping I can get more ideas here. 

14 replies
-K8memphis Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 10:47pm
post #2 of 15

AHow many times a week? And what is the general scope of work -- all baking or all decorating or all desserts or a combination?

mommyinaprilx2 Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 10:56pm
post #3 of 15

Basic cake decorating with also a little cupcakes mixed in. They also want at the end for me to show to assemble a tiered cake. It is just once a week for 6 weeks. 

poohsmomma Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 11:48pm
post #4 of 15

You could spend one two-hour class on piping...borders, writing, cornelli lace. It takes a while to master the piping bag.

Also- Duff roses, how to decorate with fondant...stripes, dots, zebra, etc.

-K8memphis Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 11:51pm
post #5 of 15

AWhat's a duff rose?

poohsmomma Posted 10 Sep 2014 , 12:36pm
post #6 of 15

This is a pictorial for a Duff rose

 

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/164874036328588555/

 

 

Here's one with directions:

 

http://judyscakes.blogspot.com/2010/08/easy-peasy-roses.html

-K8memphis Posted 10 Sep 2014 , 1:16pm
post #7 of 15

AThank you, poohsmomma -- oh yeah he did that on his show with girl scouts I think - very cool

mommyinaprilx2 Posted 26 Sep 2014 , 7:39pm
post #8 of 15

AI found out it is a 7 week course and 2.5 hours a week! Ugh, I hope I can fill these hours. I plan to let them work on parchment paper different techniques. I do plan a border class, as well as a cupcake class and learning how to fill cupcakes. The last class will be how to assemble a tiered cake. I don't think I will do a class on how to cover a cake in fondant but do plan to do one on a fondant accent class as well as butter cream roses.

I am getting nervous about this!

MimiFix Posted 26 Sep 2014 , 9:53pm
post #9 of 15

For each class, think of a few different techniques you want to teach. First you demo one technique, then students practice what they just learned. Most of the time your students should be practicing while you walk around (and around and around) stopping to help each person improve. Then repeat with another demo and practice session. Two and a half hours is not a long time for this kind of hands-on learning. 

-K8memphis Posted 26 Sep 2014 , 11:10pm
post #10 of 15

i think you should have them do a fondant covered cake or at least a dummy -- you've got almost 20 hours to use -- some people advance very quickly in this stuff and others lag behind -- i'd start with flowers myself -- drop flowers, gum paste flowers, ribbon roses -- later include modeling marzipan into harvest pumpkins,  and making chocolate leaves -- give them a sense of empowerment right off the bat whet their appetites for more -- build each class so that at the last class they can decorate & take home a one or two tier cake

 

  • icings and piping
  • rolled icings and making flowers
  • special techniques -- chocolates and marzipan modeling-- maybe easy boiled & spun sugar 
  • cookies cupcakes -- techniques to use decorating
  • trump l'oeil cakes -- spaghetti, meatloaf &mashed potatoes, a turkey cake
  • tier cake assembly -- they gotta put all the items they made somewhere 

 

extra ideas -- decorated pie, fudge using cookie cutters and silicone molds, decorated bundt cakes, gingerbread house, 3-d cookies  oh a croquembouche or a stacked cookie christmas tree --

 

for trump l'oeil i'd offer for them to do a spaghetti cake, turkey cake, or maybe meatloaf & mashed potatoes -- dig into their creativeness -- for special techniques i'd do the chocolate leaves and chocolate decor for cakes -- 

 

i think i'd watch them in the first class and divide them into a spaghetti cake group, a harvest cake group and a small tier cake group by end of the 6 weeks -- and still each student can learn all the different elements of each group once they get their work completed for that class time -- these are long classes -- get a ton of stuff and if you don't get to it no problem but you need to fill up your lesson plans -- i would go nuts if i had to do borders for 150 minutes plus their hands can't hold up that long -- you might want to break it up into 25 minutes instruction 50 minutes piping 50 minutes modeling 15 minutes instruction & 10 minutes cleanup --

 

this is a very rough draft of a possible lesson plan -- just a lot of brainstorming -- in other words i would run amok in an invisibly controlled way  working toward each of them doing a cake or dummy -- so save the leaves and flowers, pumpkins etc. for the day they make their cakes or dummies -- be sure to have boxes for them to carry home --

 

:-D 

johnson6ofus Posted 27 Sep 2014 , 3:32am
post #11 of 15

A standard wilton course is based on 2 hours, 4 classes. The timing generally works out. If you flip through a book, you will see how it is divided. (I did teach it)

 

Course 1 basic, baking, buttercream is 4 classes for 2 hours, but I bet you could cover it in 2 classes, 2.5 hours.

 

Course 2, and Course 3.. same idea. .. so you can cover buttercream, fondant and gumpaste in the first 6 classes, and leave class #7 as the grand finale and stacking.

 

I wish I could have "mixed" it up a little and modified it (leaving out ugly stuff, insert cooler stuff, and inserting holidays stuff). The basic outline in the lesson books (Hobby Lobby, Michael's, etc) may be a good starting point. Modify it as you see fit. 

kakeladi Posted 27 Sep 2014 , 7:27pm
post #12 of 15

Yes, following the basic Wilton method - very similar to what MimiFix said:............ "For each class, think of a few different techniques you want to teach. First you demo one technique, then students practice what they just learned. Most of the time your students should be practicing while you walk around (and around and around) stopping to help each person improve. Then repeat with another demo and practice session."  Introduction to piping, handling a pastry bag (both parchment and other) are important beginning elements.

K8 said: i'd start with flowers myself -  Sorry K8.... nope:) Usually your advice is mostly right on but not this time :)  They need to learn to handle a bag - going back to Wilton's intro classes.    THEN you can move on to basic flowers, borders, writing, cornelli lace, stripes, dots, etc. It takes a while to master the piping bag.

johnson6ofus Posted 27 Sep 2014 , 7:53pm
post #13 of 15

Quote:

Originally Posted by kakeladi 

Most of the time your students should be practicing while you walk around (and around and around) stopping to help each person improve. Then repeat with another demo and practice session."  

This is exactly correct. DEMO. ...student practice (with teacher making "rounds).....DEMO... student practice with teacher making faster rounds.... Got it> Move on....

 

NOT got it (technique just taught)... DEMO... rounds... repeat as necessary. 

 

 

As a teacher, you get the idea if the general class "got it". If they are all making the same mistake, you need to reteach it. Not everyone will totally "get it", but when the majority do, move on and the slow ones can practice more at home.

 

**** Don't try to do TOO much. I would rather teach 8 things they can do really well and perfect, than 10 things they will do poorly. 

 

My surprise after teaching Wilton? The students have no hand strength, so after an hour, they are unable to squeeze anymore. And I'm not talking about the old ladies... it is usually the college kids! In that case, I just repeat the demo more and talk about general design elements. 

mommyinaprilx2 Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 6:24pm
post #14 of 15

Thanks so much for the ideas!!! Now that I have started teaching the class ideas are flowing! The group is great and begged me to throw in a cookie night as well as a cupcake night. I think I will do a fondant covered cake as well as making fondant/gumpaste things as well as royal flowers, that way the last night we will have a tiered cake and they can put everything on there! I am really excited!!

-K8memphis Posted 13 Oct 2014 , 6:35pm
post #15 of 15

awesome! glad to hear you've got an enthusiastic class

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