Assemble Fondant Frills Upside Down Or Right Side Up??

Decorating By TheSweetTreat Updated 10 Sep 2014 , 3:23am by mcaulir

TheSweetTreat Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 3:12pm
post #1 of 12

Hello!

 

I am working on a 3 tier cake (all dummies) that will be covered in fondant frills on each tier.  I have already completed half of one tier and let me tell you it is taking LOTS of time.  This is the first time I have ever done fondant frills and I'm learning as I go.  Since starting the frills I have figured out I need to roll my strips thinner and maybe add some tylose to the fondant so it will hold its shape better. 

 

My question is what is the easiest way to add these frills to the cake?  So far I have added them with the cake upright and I'm working from top to bottom, but gravity keeps pulling down the strips as I work.  I then decided to give it a try flipping the dummy over and working with it upside down (which I guess you couldn't do if you had real cake).  That worked as far as the strips not flopping down as I worked, but it was hard to see if I was level or not.  Very cumbersome, this whole thing. 

 

Does anyone have any secrets or tips to attaching fondant frills quickly and efficiently? 

 

Thank you in advance!!

11 replies
ypierce82 Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 3:24pm
post #2 of 12


I don't know about doing it quickly lol but I always start from the bottom of the cake and work my way up. The petals, frills or whatever below it help to stop the ones above it from sliding down.

TheSweetTreat Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 4:09pm
post #3 of 12

Well I considered that as well, but in my mind I couldn't see how the frills would fit into place very well with a layer below it.  Maybe i'll give it a try anyway :)

Dayti Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 6:14pm
post #4 of 12

I do it with the cake the right way up if the strips are thickish because they hold their shape, especially if you let them set up for 5 mins or so. For thinner, very ruffly ruffles, I put a cake pan of the same size on top (so bottom of cake pan on top of cake) and turn the cake upside down (so now resting on cake pan edge/top - with me so far?!). You must use a chilled cake for this since it makes the whole operation a bit sturdier/easier. For a dummy you don't need to chill, but put it on something the same diameter as the top of your cake and with no marks, so you don't emboss your top fondant with something! You could also put a spare cake circle or drum on top, then put it on a smaller turntable. 

KathleenC Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 9:20pm
post #5 of 12

Try toothpicks.  Once you have a row applied, carefully stick toothpicks upright through the lower part of the strip of fondant in front of the ruffle where it appears it's going to droop.  The toothpick will stop the droop, and the hole where the toothpick is inserted will be covered by the next row of ruffle.  Once the fondant has stiffened up a bit, remove the toothpick(s).

 

Disclaimer:  I learned this AFTER I did my first ruffle cake.  :)  I will definitely be doing this next time.

kkmcmahan Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 10:07pm
post #6 of 12

I think it depends on how you want the frills in the end.  When doing the entire cake I always start at the bottom.  If you want the frills to end up facing down like they would on a skirt, the cake should be right top side up just like normal.  If you want the fills facing up like a flower or waves then you turn the cake over and do the frills the same way (facing down).  Then when you are completely done you flip the cake back over.

 

Toothpicks or pins work to help flair the frills or you can use little pieces of paper towel and just tuck them in around.  Just be sure that once everything dries you remove all the paper, toothpick or pins!

mcaulir Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 10:12pm
post #7 of 12

What are you attaching them with at the moment? And yes, you'll find it difficult with just fondant. Much easier with a fondant/GP mixture, or tylose added.

Dayti Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 10:15pm
post #8 of 12

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dayti 
 

I do it with the cake the right way up if the strips are thickish because they hold their shape, especially if you let them set up for 5 mins or so. For thinner, very ruffly ruffles, I put a cake pan of the same size on top (so bottom of cake pan on top of cake) and turn the cake upside down (so now resting on cake pan edge/top - with me so far?!). You must use a chilled cake for this since it makes the whole operation a bit sturdier/easier. For a dummy you don't need to chill, but put it on something the same diameter as the top of your cake and with no marks, so you don't emboss your top fondant with something! You could also put a spare cake circle or drum on top, then put it on a smaller turntable. 

Just to add, this is for ruffles that are upwards, not downwards like a skirt:D

TheSweetTreat Posted 10 Sep 2014 , 1:56am
post #9 of 12

Currently, I am attaching the next row of frills to half of the row above it and half to the styrofoam.  I am using gum glue for this.  When I tried last night turning the cake upside down and applying the ruffles I felt like they were going to just dry facing upward (once turning back over right side up).  I thought I should have the ruffles/frills sticking out of the side of the cake a little, but the more I look at photos it seems they are either pointing DOWN or UP and not necessarily OUT.

 

There's a craftsy class available that shows how to do this type of cake, but I don't have the extra cash to throw at it.  I am about to get started again tonight and see if I can't finish this FIRST tier.  Hopefully i'll find a good rhythm and I can get the other 2 tiers done before Saturday!  Sheesh.  

mcaulir Posted 10 Sep 2014 , 2:12am
post #10 of 12

Can I suggest covering the dummy with fondant first and then attaching the frills to that. Dummies are quite slippery when you put gum glue on them. And definitely add some tylose to your fondant.

TheSweetTreat Posted 10 Sep 2014 , 2:16am
post #11 of 12

I know that would probably make my life a whole lot easier, but I am trying to save money on fondant.  I decided to just put fondant on the top and about 1/2 inch down the sides to get the whole thing started. 

mcaulir Posted 10 Sep 2014 , 3:23am
post #12 of 12

Oh, good luck then!

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