What To Do?! Almost Too Angry To Type!

Decorating By jensco1687 Updated 8 Sep 2014 , 1:51pm by cai0311

jensco1687 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 4:20pm
post #1 of 17

So, I had a confirmed cake tasting for today that just told me she booked another baker and forgot to tell me. I baked 12 cupcakes in three differnet flavors and two types of frosting and cleared the morning for her. I do not typically charge for tastings, but I know I should start now. How should I respond to her " I already booked a baker and forgot to tell you" last minute email?

16 replies
-K8memphis Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 4:31pm
post #2 of 17

you don't have to respond at all right? case closed

 

why waste any more time on a dead end --

 

enjoy the cupcakes instead -- donate them to the local fire or police dept if you want some instant gratification --

thecakewitch Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 4:38pm
post #3 of 17

ASince you did not charge for tasting, since nothing was written down as agreement/contract, there is nothing you can do.

"How should I respond to her " I already booked a baker and forgot to tell you" last minute email?"

Thank you for the interest. Hope you have a fabulous wedding/birthday/whatever.

jensco1687 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 4:40pm
post #4 of 17

You're totally right. Any more energy spent on it would be a total waste. Do you charge a tasting fee? I've read on here mixed reviews on the subject. 

thecakewitch Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 4:44pm
post #5 of 17

AIt's your business, you're in charge, you make the rules if you want to charge or not. I do. Although i think a dozen cupcakes for tasting is too much.

-K8memphis Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 5:12pm
post #6 of 17

i am not currently in business but to avoid tastings (like the plague) i offer my brides 'k8t cakes'  -- these are two cakes made from leftover batter or cake scraps 4" or 5" cakes which are then delivered with the bridal cake in cute little 6" boxes -- one for the honeymoon cake and one for the first anniversary -- all ready to go in the freezer or the getaway car --

 

the marketing kicker is that i can advise them they can serve the entire bridal cake and make use of all the servings in the bridal cake -- often the b&g can't remember the cake or don't get but the obligatory bite of cake for the pictures -- a nice sugar blast is a good thing after a huge day like their wedding --

 

this has always been a seal the deal advantage for me -- it's all of the cost of the boxes and 2 boards -- i already have more scraps than i can handle from leveling and it's all done at once --  no re-making something up a in a year or anything -- very efficient -- you can even make a groom's cake bridal cake combo so they get both -- it's my gift to them -- 

 

just a thought -- best to you 

jensco1687 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 5:21pm
post #7 of 17

What an amazing idea! It's always a little bit of a guilty feeling tossing those scraps, but a good chef- sweet or savory makes use out of all of their product in their kitchen.

 

Thanks for the response K8memphis and btw super cute shih tzu! I had one that looked very similar to yours growing up and they are the best little babes in the world:) Does he/she sit on your feet?

-K8memphis Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 5:37pm
post #8 of 17

thank you, jensco -- he is adorable -- yes tianshi pronounced chin shoo (means angel) sits on my feet when they are cold and especially when i'm eating lest i forget he's there waiting for a bite -- he follows me from room to room  -- he's the best -- barks like a warrior -- wonderful little creature -- 

 

i'm glad you like that idea --

MimiFix Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 7:29pm
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jensco1687 
 

1. So, I had a confirmed cake tasting for today that just told me she booked another baker and forgot to tell me. 2. I baked 12 cupcakes in three differnet flavors and two types of frosting and 3. cleared the morning for her. I do not typically charge for tastings, but I know I should start now. 4. How should I respond to her " I already booked a baker and forgot to tell you" last minute email?

 

1. Customers do this kind of thing. Some people even cancel the appointment but don't bother letting you know.

2. Tastings do not need that many items. Consider cutting back.

3. "Cleared the morning"? That's too much time to spend on one possible customer. 

4. Be pleasant and brief, as the @thecakewitch suggested.

jensco1687 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 7:54pm
post #10 of 17

I responded with a very brief "thanks for the interest, have a great wedding" sort of message. A dozen cupcakes are a lot and I've been trying out different presentations when it comes to a tasting and this was a new one. I always cost out the recipes for tastings and make sure it stays reasonable in case they don't book. It was unfortunate that this happened, but was bound to happen sometime. Thanks for the replies!

kakeladi Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 12:03am
post #11 of 17

........K8 said: i offer my brides .......cakes made from leftover batter or cake scraps 4" or 5" cakes .........

 

Basically this is what I did also.

jensco1687 Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 12:13am
post #12 of 17

AIt's a super good idea!

canacake Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 12:18am
post #13 of 17

AI am not in business for myself, but did a wedding for a friend and I did a tasting for them. The same week I had a batch of 60 cupcakes for my fathers retirement party. I was baking a number of flavours and I ended up saving one of each flavour for the couple to try. If you have enough brides for tastings or enough party cakes I would start saving extras or making a bit more. Solved my issue of having to bake five flavours for the couple by simply making a bit extra for the other job. I went out of my way to do a really nice tasting, it left a good impression that is for sure, but I certainly wouldn't do that for anyone but a friend. [IMG]http://www.cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3283305/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

costumeczar Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 1:10am
post #14 of 17

I recently started charging for tastings, and my no-show rate dropped 100%. I'm booking fewer tastings but have increased the number of bookings per day because the people who do pay for a tasting have more interest in hiring me than people who are just out to get free cake. And I don't apply the cost of the tasting to the price of the cake, either.

 

I had one girl this week make an appointment but she didn't pay the appt fee (I send each person a confirmation email the week of the appt, and then send a paypal invoice for the fee. I tell them that the fee being paid confirms the appt.) She didn't respond to a reminder on the invoice, so I emailed her and said that since she hadn't paid the invoice I assumed that she was cancelling the appt. I didn't make samples for her and she didn't show up. If I hadn't been charging for the appt I probably would have put samples together in case she did come, but now it's no fee paid, no samples.

 

And @MimiFix is right, there's no need to provide that much cake for a tasting appt. It's a tasting, not a meal. I always do 4  basic flavors and cut pieces that will fit into little lidded cups so that I can transport them to my office. I wouldn't do cupcakes for people, that's too much cake.

jensco1687 Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 1:37am
post #15 of 17

I understand that the cupcakes were too large of a serving for a single tasting. I've done multiple types of tastings from filled slices layed out on a tray, to sample sizes they can put different types of frostings on to cupcakes and each time I observe how the different presentations impact the overall experience (speed of consultation, segway from taste to design). 

 

I am doing my research now on what to charge for tastings, I think it may be the best route to go to avoid this situation.

costumeczar Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 10:30am
post #16 of 17

A

Original message sent by jensco1687

I understand that the cupcakes were too large of a serving for a single tasting. I've done multiple types of tastings from filled slices layed out on a tray, to sample sizes they can put different types of frostings on to cupcakes and each time I observe how the different presentations impact the overall experience (speed of consultation, segway from taste to design). 

I am doing my research now on what to charge for tastings, I think it may be the best route to go to avoid this situation.

It really will cut down on the no-shows, and if you make it a non-refundable fee you won't feel like you lost as much if they cancel.

cai0311 Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 1:51pm
post #17 of 17

AIn my area charging to tastings is not the norm, so I don't charge for my tastings. But in 7 years I have only had 3 or 4 no shows. While each no show is annoying - less than 1 per year is not enough to change the way I do business.

Here is how I do my tastings: When I have extra batter I bake it (even if it is only enought of a 5" round cake pan). I cut the cake into large bite size pieces. Then I put those pieces in a zip lock sandwich baggie. Several baggies fit into a zip lock freezer bag. The samples sit in my freezer just waiting for my next tasting. I pull them out 30 minutes before my tasting (1 peice per person - up to 3 people). I put the cake in a plastic jello shot cup with a lid so it doesn't dry out. I do the same for my fillings and buttercream minus the lid.

Because I only bake up extra batter the quantity is small. Samples are never in my freezer for more than 2 months so they never get old or freezer burned.

I schedule 1.5 hours for a consultation (that includes set up and clean up).

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