Somebody...anybody...everybody Help!

Decorating By Elfchef87 Updated 15 Sep 2014 , 1:10pm by JanetBme

Elfchef87 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 12:33am
post #1 of 26

I am new to cake decorating (baking actively for the past two years) and still I can't get a handle on buttercream...that is not entirely true I have ABC down. I have had several requests for less sweet frostings but not sugar free just not grocery store sweet. 

 

I know of popcorn salt and cream cheese but are there any others? There are just somethings you can do with ABC that you can't achieve with others. I don't want to give it up as I find it very easy to build on and it isn't fussy (especially Indydebi's crusting buttercream) it has been a God send with this weeks humidity. 

 

Naturally I turned to SMBC and the greasy after taste was so bad that I thought I messed it up the first time. Research confirmed I did not, so I tried cooled melted chocolate and it helps but the after taste is still palpable. I then turned to genache and have stuck to it, it provides the sharpest edges but piping with it, I find is not ideal. I have heard about flour buttercream but my failures with buttercream are preventing me from taking the leap. 

 

Here are my questions: 

 

1. Is there a way to slightly dim the sugary bite to ABC? 

 

2. Has anyone out there tried Flour buttercream? How is the taste? How does it pipe well? How well does it behave with heat, being colored, being flavored and really any information you have. 

 

3. Are there other buttercreams that I don't know about, besides the American and the European variations that is?  

 

I' m sorry this is so long, I feel like I'm asking an open ended question on the SAT's but I'm just about at my wits end. I will greatly appreciate any input. 

 

 

Thanks,

25 replies
cai0311 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 1:01am
post #2 of 26

AI use Sharon Sugar Shack's buttercream. It is a type of ABC buttercream but not on overly sweet. The number one comment I get from clients is that they like the buttercream because it isn't too sweet.

You can find the recipe on CC. It also holds up great in high heat and humidity.

MKC Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 1:05am
post #3 of 26

AI use SMBC but I've seen recipes that include way too much butter.

My ratios are:

8 large egg white 2 cup of sugar 1 pound of butter

I was never successful with the flour recipes but I hear that it can take a while to perfect it.

Rfisher Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 1:44am
post #4 of 26

AAs stated above, try sugarshacks. Or Charlottes. Try hi-ratio for some of your fat in abc Try buttermilk as some/all of your liquid. some swear by a bit of lemon juice. Mix your smbc into your abc in varying quantities. As stated above, butter ratio for smbc may be not to your liking. I personally do not like any 1-2-3 recipe. As for flour/ roux buttercream, give it a try. There are different versions out there. It may not be exactly what you are currently looking for, but having it in your arsenal may be useful someday.

Elfchef87 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 1:57am
post #5 of 26

Thank you all!

 

Rfisher! I have a batch of SMBC that I chalked as a fail in the fridge so I will take your advice and prepare a traditional ABC and then see where it takes me. 

 

@cai0311 Thanks for the tip I will check out her recipe it sounds like exactly what I need but can you pipe roses with it and get good definition? I need to pipe a ton of hair on a monster cake? will it hold?

 

 

Thanks again.

Elfchef87 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 2:05am
post #6 of 26

I am on the hunt for Sharon sugar shack's buttercream, does anyone have a link? 

Rfisher Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 2:06am
post #7 of 26

AI just had a thought. You might want to try brite white/ angel white icing base type product to add to your abc. some people feel it takes away some of the powdered sugar "bite" away.

Rfisher Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 2:09am
post #8 of 26

A

Original message sent by Elfchef87

I am on the hunt for Sharon sugar shack's buttercream, does anyone have a link? 

http://www.cakecentral.com/newsearch?search=Sugarshack&type=a-50

Elfchef87 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 2:16am
post #9 of 26

Hooray! Thank you guys so much I will try both and see what works I think it's time I find myself a go to icing! Thanks again!

Elfchef87 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 2:51am
post #10 of 26

Sorry, I'm back and probably getting on your nerves :oops: but I forgot one thing, you have never had any issues with the greasy after taste from the shortening, either with the high ratio or Crisco brand from Sharon's recipe?  

Rfisher Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 3:48am
post #11 of 26

ADue to dietary restrictions I can only eat Yahtzee dice.

Elfchef87 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 4:22am
post #12 of 26

LOL I had that coming! 

cai0311 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 12:38pm
post #13 of 26

A

Original message sent by Elfchef87

Thank you all!

@ Rfisher! I have a batch of SMBC that I chalked as a fail in the fridge so I will take your advice and prepare a traditional ABC and then see where it takes me. 

@cai0311  Thanks for the tip I will check out her recipe it sounds like exactly what I need but can you pipe roses with it and get good definition? I need to pipe a ton of hair on a monster cake? will it hold?

Thanks again.

You can pipe roses, hair, grass... Anything you want with Sharon's recipe. The fat to powdered sugar ratio determines how stiff the buttercream. Depending on what you are using it for will determine the thickness you need.

There is going to be some grease factor because shortening is used, but it is by no means greasy. It is a great recipe.

I buy my sweetex shortening at GFS

-K8memphis Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 2:34pm
post #14 of 26

i hope mkc will come back and post how much vanilla is right for that recipe -- mkc where are you :smile:

 

some people make successful smbc with shortening but the one time i tried to substitute a small quantity of butter for shortening it did not work for me --  spit it out -- so i only use butter and having the right amount of vanilla is crucial -- my recipe is is one teaspoon of vanilla for every egg white -- there are numerous recipes online -- but watch out for the vanilla factor --

 

then on the flour power recipes -- that's all i used in the previous century when i changed from all abc -- it smooths like smbc it holds well -- i did use shortening in mine i think/maybe -- can't remember ;) but it pipes ok for borders -- if i was piping roses i'd make abc though -- i could pipe a rose out of flour power but i didn't --- i guess the biggest thing about it is when it gets warm in the end of the piping bag it's spent -- but every icing has it's strengths and weaknesses -- the definition is better with abc --

 

none of your icing should be greasy though -- if the flavoring does not zip it up it's not been made right --

 

best to you

MBalaska Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 6:08pm
post #15 of 26
Quote:

Originally Posted by -K8memphis 

 

....."some people make successful smbc with shortening but the one time i tried to substitute a small quantity of butter for shortening it did not work for me --  spit it out -- so i only use butter and having the right amount of vanilla is crucial"...............

 

 

 

So true, and boy did I get a surprise with the shortening yesterday.

When I added about a half cup of white vegetable shortening (Crisco) to the SMBC (to firm it up a bit), all looked A-OK. Tasted ok also.  Then I colored it the dark colors for the pattern to be piped.  There were dozens of little dots/spots of pure white in the colored icing that I couldn't beat out.  No more Crisco in the recipe for me. 

jchuck Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 6:46pm
post #16 of 26

AElfchef87 This a thread that was started a couple of week a ago. I posted my cooked flour frosting on there. You might want to read the posts through. achieve a light buttercream that holds up well in the ... - Cake Central www.cakecentral.com/.../achieve-a-light-buttercream-that-holds-up-well-in-... Aug 27, 2014 - I'm in desperate need of a buttercream icing that's non-gritty, light as whipped cream, doesn't crust, holds up well in warmer temperatures, white ...

Elfchef87 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 11:10pm
post #17 of 26

AThanks for all the helpful tips and tricks. @jchuck the link was no good.

jchuck Posted 8 Sep 2014 , 2:14am
post #18 of 26

AOh that's too bad. Here's the link for the cooked flour frosting I use....way easier than SMBC and light tasting and not sweet. Even Better (!) Cooked Flour Frosting leelabeanbakes.com/blog/frosting-filling/even-better-cooked-flour-frosting/

Natka81 Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 12:31am
post #19 of 26

I have tried cooked frosting. this cake was iced with cooked frostingBaby Shower  Cake

But, to tell you the truth SMBC is "lighter", on stomach. This was first time I made cooked frosting and first cake iced with this frosting. Now I am practicing with SMBC. 

Elfchef87 Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 12:58am
post #20 of 26

What was the taste and texture like? When you say SMBC is lighter on the stomach than cooked frosting, do mean cooked frosting is too sweet? The frosting looks very smooth, was it easy to work with? Sorry if it sounds like an interrogation.The cake looks great by the way. :lol:

Natka81 Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 2:09am
post #21 of 26

 Taste: Cooked frosting reminds me of pudding with a lot of butter.

Texture:similar to SMBC, but cooked frosting is softer than SMBC. when cold.

 

No, cooked frosting is not sweeter than SMBC, by "lighter" I meant that it looks like cooked frosting takes more butter per recipe than SMBC. ( I have noticed a stomach ache after eating cooked frosting, excuse me if I sound funny). 

 

I don`t know which one is easier to work with SMBC or Cooked frosting. I just started seriously learning decorating cakes and everything is hard for me (especially smoothing). 

 

Making cooked frosting is not easier than making SMBC, because it has to go thru a sieve, so there is no lumps of flour.

 

Thanks for the compliment on cake. Round cakes are easier to smooth.

For my practicing I have decided to bake square cakes and pipe minimum decorations, on purpose, so I can learn to smooth and build sharp corners.

 

1. Cooked frosting is worth a try.

2. Try to put way less butter in SMBC.

I would just say, play with all kinds recipes for all kinds of frostings and you will find what you like.

-K8memphis Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 3:04am
post #22 of 26

AIf you combine your flour and sugar first then add the milk and proceed -- there's no lumps -- I start stirring with a whisk then switch to a stirring utensil with a flat edge to keep the mixture from sticking

jchuck Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 3:18am
post #23 of 26

AYes K8memphis....that's exactly how I make my cooked flour frosting. And there's never any lumps. I made some just on the wknd as I have 2 cakes coming up to do. Did 50/50 butter and shortening, just to see how it would be. Was very good, not greasy...still light.

-K8memphis Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 3:22am
post #24 of 26

Ahigh five, jchuck -- it's a great product huh

Elfchef87 Posted 9 Sep 2014 , 3:31am
post #25 of 26

@jchuck and _K8memphis Thanks!

 

I have a great reference point. I am curious about cooked frosting just because it's not something I've ever eaten or made. I know what I will be doing this weekend after my deliveries! :D

JanetBme Posted 15 Sep 2014 , 1:10pm
post #26 of 26

Quote:

Originally Posted by cai0311 

I use Sharon Sugar Shack's buttercream. It is a type of ABC buttercream but not on overly sweet. The number one comment I get from clients is that they like the buttercream because it isn't too sweet.

You can find the recipe on CC. It also holds up great in high heat and humidity.


me too... Mine has half the shortening as butter tho-  But, if they ask for less sweet icing and they've never tried yours anyway- or even if they have (but not on a whole cake)...I say sure, I'll see what I can do!...then make the same icing.    The only way I'd change it is if they had an allergy or something like that.    Also, if your icing is too sweet- it could actually be the vanilla... Some vanilla (like wilton) have that effect.  Try a real Madagascar vanilla or Superior Vanilla.  It makes a difference.  

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