Steps To Assembling A Cake After It's Been Baked/decorated For Cleints?

Decorating By mmhassa2 Updated 7 Sep 2014 , 10:48pm by -K8memphis

mmhassa2 Posted 6 Sep 2014 , 3:21pm
post #1 of 7

Ok I've thought about asking this from you ladies since many of you do this on a regular basis.  I've self-taught myself through this board and online to bake and have recently started doing this for clients as well on the side of my cake pop business but need help with a few things.

 

Lets assume it's a 8" cake single tier cake...

 

-What size of a cake board do you use at the bottom?  I guess it depends on the fact if you want the bottom to show a lot say for wordings or not.  But what is the "rule of thumb" for a cake?

-Now depending on the board used above, what size box do you store the cake in? Exact size of the board?  Would that risk the chance of the cake edges touching the box during transporting. 

-I often see the strong cake boards and also the thin scalloped ones.  Can anyone explain what the thin ones are used for as I assume it would be too thin to hold the wait of the cake during shifting it from the box to the cake stand?

 

Now if I were to add a 6" cake on top of a 8" (So a 2 tiered)...

-What is a easiest way to add support?

-Does the 6" go on a cake board or a thin cake board? Looking for a seamless transition between the 2 tiers.

 

I really feel I've gotten the main baking/decorating part of all this down but need advice on the other parts as they'll be leaving my house to clients. 

 

Also looking to order this set to start off with for the variety of sizes, are 2" deep pans standard? I do plan to use 2 separate cakes to make 4" high. 

http://www.amazon.ca/dp/B0000VZ2QG/?tag=cakecentral-20

6 replies
mcaulir Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 11:12am
post #2 of 7

 

-What size of a cake board do you use at the bottom?  I guess it depends on the fact if you want the bottom to show a lot say for wordings or not.  But what is the "rule of thumb" for a cake?

 

I always put a cake on a board the same size as the cake to ice and decorate it, and then put it on a presentation board. That would usually be 4-6 inches larger in diameter than the cake. So I might put an 8inch cake on a 12 inch board. It depends if I want the board decorated in some way.

 

 

-Now depending on the board used above, what size box do you store the cake in? Exact size of the board?  Would that risk the chance of the cake edges touching the box during transporting. 

 

I make mine close to the size of the presentation board, but usually a big bigger so people can get their fingers around the board to pick it up.

 

-I often see the strong cake boards and also the thin scalloped ones.  Can anyone explain what the thin ones are used for as I assume it would be too thin to hold the wait of the cake during shifting it from the box to the cake stand?

 

I'm not in the US, and we don't use those here, but I believe they can hold the weight of the cake just fine.

 

Now if I were to add a 6" cake on top of a 8" (So a 2 tiered)...

-What is a easiest way to add support?

 

I use drinking straws - mostly thick ones now that I've bought a box of 1000 of them, but many of my cakes have been done with regular drinking straws. Super easy to insert and trim with scissors.

 

-Does the 6" go on a cake board or a thin cake board? Looking for a seamless transition between the 2 tiers.

 

It's up to you. Someone US-based might need to clarify, but I believe many people use the thin boards and call them 'cake circles'.

 

 

Also looking to order this set to start off with for the variety of sizes, are 2" deep pans standard? I do plan to use 2 separate cakes to make 4" high. 

 

I use all 3" pans, but I understand that most people use 2". I don't know how you get the whole cake to rise above the level of the 2" pans so you can trim to 2", but lots of people here seems to do it.

MimiFix Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 6:39pm
post #3 of 7

If you're planning on adding a cake business to your cakepops, consider buying two sets of the same size pans. It makes production far easier. 

AZCouture Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 8:58pm
post #4 of 7

Quote:

Originally Posted by mmhassa2 
 

Ok I've thought about asking this from you ladies since many of you do this on a regular basis. 

:lol:

 

Yeah, it's actually some people's source of income, aka a JOB. :D

AZCouture Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 9:01pm
post #5 of 7

Ditto to mcaulir and Mimi, pretty much. I bake in two inch pans, but collar them with parchment, so they rise above the edge of the pan. I generally end up with tiers that are about 5", maybe a wee bit taller once they're filled and iced. I don't do any trimming, they are flat and even already. And if they aren't quite flat and even, I'll press on them with a paper towel a bit just to even it out, right after taking out of the oven before removing from pan.

-K8memphis Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 10:08pm
post #6 of 7

for $10 less you can get all that and an additional 8"

 

http://cooksdream.com/store/product/a/llpsllp350.html

 

these are magic line pans -- the wilton pans are not usually this hefty quality

-K8memphis Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 10:48pm
post #7 of 7

there's a fat daddio's set that's the same price as the wilton's set but you add in a 14" pan too

 

http://cooksdream.com/store/product/a/fdprds681012142.html

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