I'm Really Confused!!!

Baking By soldiernurse Updated 2 Sep 2014 , 9:01pm by Rfisher

soldiernurse Posted 2 Sep 2014 , 1:14pm
post #1 of 9

Pros, what is the difference between HEAVY CREAM and HEAVY WHIPPING CREAM???????? I'm trying various recipes that calls for one or the other and often times, I cannot find the one I'm looking for..I find the other!! Which is best for genache?  I've Googled it but it's still confusing.

8 replies
imagenthatnj Posted 2 Sep 2014 , 2:10pm
post #2 of 9

I think at one point there used to be either "heavy cream" or "whipping cream" but then packages started to appear with the words "heavy whipping cream" (with the "heavy" in smaller letters) and now we are all confused about them. Is it whipping cream that is now heavy? Or is it heavy cream that you can whip?

 

You should probably just check the fat content. They are essentially the same, but heavy cream has more fat than whipping cream. I'm not sure about the combined "heavy whipping cream" anymore.

 

People in Australia have it easier. Their double cream has 48-60% fat. Easier to differentiate from the single cream at 36%.

 

Whipping cream here has 30-36% fat. Heavy cream has more than 36%. It's probably best to look at labels/fat content than at the name now.

 

Here are some links.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cream

 

http://www.finecooking.com/articles/heavy-cream-vs-whipping-cream.aspx

 

http://www.cakecentral.com/t/764214/heavy-cream-vs-whipping-cream-for-ganache

 

http://simmerandboil.cookinglight.com/2009/02/17/heavy-cream-vs/

 

soldiernurse Posted 2 Sep 2014 , 2:19pm
post #3 of 9

Quote:

Originally Posted by imagenthatnj 
 

I think at one point there used to be either "heavy cream" or "whipping cream" but then packages started to appear with the words "heavy whipping cream" (with the "heavy" in smaller letters) and now we are all confused about them. Is it whipping cream that is now heavy? Or is it heavy cream that you can whip?

 

You should probably just check the fat content. They are essentially the same, but heavy cream has more fat than whipping cream. I'm not sure about the combined "heavy whipping cream" anymore.

 

People in Australia have it easier. Their double cream has 48-60% fat. Easier to differentiate from the single cream at 36%.

 

Whipping cream here has 30-36% fat. Heavy cream has more than 36%. It's probably best to look at labels/fat content than at the name now.

 

Here are some links.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cream

 

http://www.finecooking.com/articles/heavy-cream-vs-whipping-cream.aspx

 

http://www.cakecentral.com/t/764214/heavy-cream-vs-whipping-cream-for-ganache

 

http://simmerandboil.cookinglight.com/2009/02/17/heavy-cream-vs/

 

 

...glad to know that it's not just me..I felt like such the idiot! Will look at the fat content and try to choose rom there..the more fat, the heavier the cream, the less fat, the lighter the cream? I dunno. will ck out the links too.

soldiernurse Posted 2 Sep 2014 , 4:43pm
post #4 of 9

bump

erin2345 Posted 2 Sep 2014 , 4:56pm
post #5 of 9

Heavy cream in North America is 35% Whipping Cream.  You can't use a percentage less than 35% to get whipped cream to to make ganache for icing a cake.  You can use a lighter cream (10% - 18%)  to make ganache for like a fondue or something similar.

lanawith Posted 2 Sep 2014 , 6:42pm
post #6 of 9

nothing :)

imagenthatnj Posted 2 Sep 2014 , 7:13pm
post #7 of 9

OK, from my On Baking textbook:

Light whipping cream, also called simply "whipping cream," contains between 30% to 36% milk fat.

 

Heavy whipping cream, also called simply "heavy cream," contains no less than 36% milk fat. It whips easily and holds its whipped texture longer than other creams.

 

(so they are the same thing)

 

As Erin2345 said, use the heavy whipping cream or heavy cream, to make ganache (but make sure to check the fat content, just in case).

soldiernurse Posted 2 Sep 2014 , 8:19pm
post #8 of 9

thanks all!!:grin:

Rfisher Posted 2 Sep 2014 , 9:01pm
post #9 of 9

AIf you get your hands on 40% cream, take care if you pair it with a high cocoa butter content chocolate.....

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