Could I Put A Cardboard Round Under My Cheesecake So The Crust Doesn't Stick To The Pan?

Decorating By beachandsweets Updated 7 Sep 2014 , 2:33am by nikki4199

beachandsweets Posted 28 Aug 2014 , 8:44pm
post #1 of 19

AWhen I make a graham cracker crust cheesecake it never makes it fully out of the pan looking pretty. Could I put a cardboard round in the bottom of the pan? If not, what else could I do? Thanks!

18 replies
-K8memphis Posted 28 Aug 2014 , 8:46pm
post #2 of 19

yes -- cardboard circle -- no problem -- 

Laetia Posted 28 Aug 2014 , 8:54pm
post #3 of 19

ACardboard in the oven? Really? :eek: I've always use parchment paper, never tought using cardboard round...

Dayti Posted 28 Aug 2014 , 9:59pm
post #4 of 19

I always use a circle of parchment paper too. I think the cardboard when heated would give off a funny smell which might permeate into your cheesecake, not to mention it might soak up any fat rendering it useless/soggy, so it would be difficult to get off. 

beachandsweets Posted 28 Aug 2014 , 11:07pm
post #5 of 19

AThat's what I was afraid of. Springform pans have the indent on the bottom piece and it's so hard for me to get the cheesecake out even with parchment paper!

MimiFix Posted 29 Aug 2014 , 12:00am
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis 
 

yes -- cardboard circle -- no problem -- 

 

Agree. No problem... Used cardboard circles for years. With commercial production it simplified the process.

-K8memphis Posted 29 Aug 2014 , 12:06am
post #7 of 19

yes the cardboard gets soaked with fat-- it gives off no odor though we use them all the time in our cakes and they are not stinky -- and they are perfect for no crumble in-one-piece removal -- you can get it out fine like this -- get it chilled down and swap out the cardboard--easy peasy done it zillions of times -- i usually bake 'em in a cake pan though --

 

if you are concerned -- chill it before you remove it from the pan -- but the cardboard is more foolproof -- if you freeze it it should come out even better -- but let's face it -- it's got a ridge around the edge -- if you go frozen -- flip it all the way over --

 

ok i got one more -- what about can you flip the bottom of the pan over-- is it smoother on that side?

Dayti Posted 29 Aug 2014 , 12:41am
post #8 of 19

Interesting Mimi and K8. I get that in cakes they don't smell but I thought that if heated they would (not that I've ever tried it with a cake circle). They get soggy, ok, but do you re-use them when dry or whatever? Cake circles are a bit pricey over here, even wholesale, so I can't see it working for me better than a parchment circle. It could also be that in the US they are a different product to what I use over here - they are about 1/8-1/4 thick, foil coated on the top and just under the bottom edge. Like a cake drum, only thinner....

-K8memphis Posted 29 Aug 2014 , 1:01am
post #9 of 19

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dayti 
 

Interesting Mimi and K8. I get that in cakes they don't smell but I thought that if heated they would (not that I've ever tried it with a cake circle). They get soggy, ok, but do you re-use them when dry or whatever? Cake circles are a bit pricey over here, even wholesale, so I can't see it working for me better than a parchment circle. It could also be that in the US they are a different product to what I use over here - they are about 1/8-1/4 thick, foil coated on the top and just under the bottom edge. Like a cake drum, only thinner....

 

 

oh yeah, no -- here they are just corrugated cardboard -- usually white on top brown on bottom -- made for food -- and it's discarded after this -- should be replaced for serving --

 

so i would not use the foil one unless i tested it and checked with the supplier as to the materials --

winniemog Posted 29 Aug 2014 , 1:28am
post #10 of 19

AI wouldn't use the foil-covered ones unless I got the ok from the manufacturer. They're mostly the type we get here in Australia too.

To make it easier to get things out of springform pans, invert the base plate, so the lip is facing down. Then you have a flatter surface to remove your item from. Also using parchment/baking paper and chilling the item before removal will make it so much easier. But try flipping the base, it's amazing how much that helps!

MBalaska Posted 29 Aug 2014 , 2:29am
post #11 of 19

Quote:

Originally Posted by winniemog 

I wouldn't use the foil-covered ones unless I got the ok from the manufacturer. They're mostly the type we get here in Australia too.

To make it easier to get things out of springform pans, invert the base plate, so the lip is facing down. Then you have a flatter surface to remove your item from. Also using parchment/baking paper and chilling the item before removal will make it so much easier. But try flipping the base, it's amazing how much that helps!

 

Lips down, parchment bottom, chill,  Yes that's what has worked best for me also.........

with shipping so expensive for us in Alaska I couldn't afford to use cardboard rounds, but it does sound like a great idea.

msbelle21 Posted 29 Aug 2014 , 3:08pm
post #12 of 19

I use a circle of parchment paper. Works fine for me. Just unlock the spring form and use a super wide spatula to help me lift. Voila. Using cardboard sounds scary (to me anyway).

beachandsweets Posted 5 Sep 2014 , 4:06pm
post #13 of 19

Duh why did I not think of flipping the bottom...

MBalaska Posted 5 Sep 2014 , 4:30pm
post #14 of 19

beachandsweets.......Oh please don't give me credit for thinking of it  lol  it was discovered by accident when I put the darn thing in backwards one day.:cry:

It was just one of those serendipity Happy Accidents........ sometimes things just go terribly right.

MimiFix Posted 5 Sep 2014 , 6:31pm
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBalaska 

 

It was just one of those serendipity Happy Accidents........ sometimes things just go terribly right.

 

Some of my best-selling recipes started as unfortunate accidents. :wink: 

-K8memphis Posted 5 Sep 2014 , 7:23pm
post #16 of 19

Ai was too young to actually first hand remember but 'they' say that brownies were an accident -- i mean just think about a world without brownies --

MBalaska Posted 5 Sep 2014 , 8:40pm
post #17 of 19

http://madconomist.com/9-famous-things-invented-by-accident

 

When it comes to something like the choice of cardboard vs. parchment.  Try them both.  What does one cardboard round cost you?  worth a try if you're interested beachandsweets.

beachandsweets Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 1:34am
post #18 of 19

I don't mind losing the cardboard I just didn't want to lose a cheesecake! That would be sad

nikki4199 Posted 7 Sep 2014 , 2:33am
post #19 of 19

AI flip the bottom of my spring form pan upside down it works good

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