My First Stacked Cake - Boy Was That Messy. Argggghhhhh

Lounge By MBalaska Updated 5 Sep 2014 , 4:44pm by MBalaska

MBalaska Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 12:30am
post #1 of 44

I can hit some of the things that I need to change, then feel free to add what I'm missing.

or I'll never learn.  (Talent you can't give me, unfortunately)

 

Fondant Snowy Owl, SMBC rosette cake, modeling chocolate bark.

 

 

I meant this to be a rosette cake on top of a wood look cake (like a slice of a tree with the bark still on it.)

  • 6" small cake got HUGE after I started putting rosettes on it.
  • 8" bottom cake got really small in comparison, should have made it 10" at least.  Should have darkened the icing on the bottom cake to make it look more like real stained wood.
  • Used the bubble tea straws to hold up the top cake.  This is the first time that I've braved out a stacked cake.  Argggggg  I really man-handled the top cake & had to re-ice in two big spots.
  • Sooooo I had to put a bottom border on the cake, and that makes it look goofy.
  • because there was no room on the bottom I couldn't put any pine cones or twigs.
  • That is the saddest looking Owl ever, I'd like to take some lipstick and paint a smile on it's stupid face. 

 

How in heavens name do you ever stack a buttercream cake without butchering it????? I can hear Leah_s right now......"SPS....SPS.....SPS" :)

 

really that owl is creeping me out, I'm taking it off before it pecks my untalented anti-artist eyes out.:lol:

43 replies
MBalaska Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 12:33am
post #2 of 44

on the bright side, it's the buttermilk-banana cake recipe and super delicious Swiss Meringue Buttercream, so it will be delicious when I cut into it.  ;-D  LOL

Dayti Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 12:46am
post #3 of 44

AI like it! I think you did a good job and, for your first stacked cake it's great, nice and straight. Everything you mentioned is easily remedied...bigger base tier, get your top cake really cold to avoid damaging on stacking it, paint the top surface of the bottom tier, etc. You recognised all your "flaws", which lots of people cannot/will not do or see, but the cake is perfectly acceptable as is. And I think your owl is very cute. If I were nearer I would pop round for a slice!

winniemog Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 1:25am
post #4 of 44

AI don't often do buttercream cakes, but I chill them really well before I move them and that seems to protect them a little from the handling. I would probably be inclined to pipe the rosettes when the tier was in place on the bottom tier, but I'm sure someone with more experience will have better advice!

winniemog Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 1:27am
post #5 of 44

AAnd your owl is a bit like me - vertically challenged and slightly wide - but at least I can tell it's an owl! He's pretty cute really, only slightly creepy...,,

Bunny0410 Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 1:46am
post #6 of 44

It looks great.

 

Well done!

 

You are your own worst critic!

 

 

The only thing I would change is the rosettes, would probably of done them finer, but love your trunk, and I dont think the owl is scary at all.


I think the buttercream is only difficult if your layer is too thick. Mine kind of sets so it's not so soft, and I treat it much the same as ganache.

MBalaska Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 1:58am
post #7 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dayti 

I like it! I think you did a good job and, for your first stacked cake it's great, nice and straight. Everything you mentioned is easily remedied...bigger base tier, get your top cake really cold to avoid damaging on stacking it, paint the top surface of the bottom tier, etc. You recognised all your "flaws", which lots of people cannot/will not do or see, but the cake is perfectly acceptable as is. And I think your owl is very cute.
If I were nearer I would pop round for a slice!

 

get the top cake really cold, paint the top...thanks Dayti.  (my husband tasted the banana cake and said it was the most banana flavored- moist banana cake I've made so far - so good news there.)

MBalaska Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 2:00am
post #8 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by winniemog 

I don't often do buttercream cakes, but I chill them really well before I move them and that seems to protect them a little from the handling. I would probably be inclined to pipe the rosettes when the tier was in place on the bottom tier, but I'm sure someone with more experience will have better advice!

 

You're right, I could've done the whole top, plopped it on the straws, and piped on the lowest row of rosettes.  Thanks winniemog, good thinking.

 

(Cheers to us wider than tall peeps.)

MBalaska Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 2:05am
post #9 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bunny0410 

It looks great.

Well done!

You are your own worst critic!

 

The only thing I would change is the rosettes, would probably of done them finer, but love your trunk, and I dont think the owl is scary at all.


I think the buttercream is only difficult if your layer is too thick. Mine kind of sets so it's not so soft, and I treat it much the same as ganache.

 

Bunny0410  I'm grateful for the suggestions.  I used an Ateco tip that was huge, so your making good sense in recommending a smaller tip for the next time.  It was only a 6" cake.  Thanks.

MBalaska Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 2:38am
post #10 of 44

Perhaps you just have to jump in with both feet and give it a go......  You can watch video clips until the cows come home, but nothing replaces hands-on practical experience.  Kudos to the Super Stacking decorators out there, you've grown exponentially in my eyes today!

-K8memphis Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 2:49am
post #11 of 44

AMultiplied congratulations you did great for a first tier cake -- dang you taught yourself so much --

one way to stack tiers is to pull your dowel up out of the cake several inches then hover the cake over and center it over the dowel and release -- the weight of the tier sinks the dowel back down* -- and if you have a long skewer or dowel stuck into the top tier to act as a bit of a handle to help keep things steady -- them remove and patch the hole --

*however 6" cakes are not necessarily heavy enough to sink down automatically like the bigger tiers so do I recommend the 'handle' esp for 6" cakes --

and it is important to push the dowel down then pull up so you have a pathway -- probably need tweezers or hemistats to pull up bubble tea straws --

however maybe you already do that - just thought I'd toss that out if it might come in handy--

great job!

MBalaska Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 3:00am
post #12 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by -K8memphis 

Multiplied congratulations you did great for a first tier cake -- dang you taught yourself so much --

one way to stack tiers is to pull your dowel up out of the cake several inches then hover the cake over and center it over the dowel and release -- the weight of the tier sinks the dowel back down* -- and if you have a long skewer or dowel stuck into the top tier to act as a bit of a handle to help keep things steady -- them remove and patch the hole --

*however 6" cakes are not necessarily heavy enough to sink down automatically like the bigger tiers so do I recommend the 'handle' esp for 6" cakes --

and it is important to push the dowel down then pull up so you have a pathway -- probably need tweezers or hemistats to pull up bubble tea straws --

however maybe you already do that - just thought I'd toss that out if it might come in handy--

great job!

 

Yeah -K8memphis today I learned about needing tweezers to pull up the bubble straws.  I cut them too short, had to pull them all out, re-cut and re-placed. lol.

 

It would have been easy to pull the straws up just a tad taller, so I could place the top cake on without worrying about damaging the bottom cake.  Very smart (that's why everyone's experience is so helpful) 

 

baby steps to the stars, just baby steps.......  I can certainly see why fondant covered cakes are so much easier to stack.

vldutoit Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 11:10am
post #13 of 44

AYou did a great job! On my 6 inch rosette cakes ( I make a lot of them) I like the Wilton 2D tip. It gives a tighter rose and sits closer to the cake. Most folks use the 1M, and I will too on larger tiers, but switching to the 2D helps to create a slight definition.

maisie73 Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 11:34am
post #14 of 44

AYay, well done MB, it's lovely. :-)

The only thing that really jumped out at me was the piping around the bottom of the rosette tier. And that's only because I had to do that to my own rosette cake to hide the gaps and I didn't like it when it was done. I don't know how other people do rosettes from bottom to top with no gaps and a nice neat edge tho. I like the owl, he looks like an owl, not creepy at all. I think you've done really, really well, much better than I did on my first tiered cake. :-)

Thanks for the "tip" Vidutoit, I used a 1M but I'll try a 2D next time.

-K8memphis Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 11:36am
post #15 of 44

AI like those 3/4" plastic tube dowel because you can just stick your finger in to wind them back up & out of the cake -- they can be popped to size with those short curvy bladed twig snapping little trimmers I donw know the official name of :) --

and you cut them all the same length to each other -- not cut individually to the top of the cake-- and you placed them under the bulk of the weight of the six inch cake -- not around the outer perimeter but around in a 4" diameter give or take --

you did awesome for your first!

Dayti Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 3:30pm
post #16 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by maisie73 

I don't know how other people do rosettes from bottom to top with no gaps and a nice neat edge tho.
 

You get gaps, but you fill them in with something :D This was a 6" x 4" before decorating, and I used a 1M tip, and I recall I put it on a 10" drum (which I should have decorated).

 

MBalaska Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 6:28pm
post #17 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by vldutoit 

You did a great job! On my 6 inch rosette cakes ( I make a lot of them) I like the Wilton 2D tip. It gives a tighter rose and sits closer to the cake. Most folks use the 1M, and I will too on larger tiers, but switching to the 2D helps to create a slight definition.

 

You are right vldutoit, I used the 2D when I made my first rosette cake. This is my second rosette cake.  It did give more definition and lighter petals.    Gosh I have no earthly idea why I was choking up so much on making this stacked cake.

MBalaska Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 6:34pm
post #18 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by maisie73 

Yay, well done MB, it's lovely. icon_smile.gif

The only thing that really jumped out at me was the piping around the bottom of the rosette tier. And that's only because I had to do that to my own rosette cake to hide the gaps and I didn't like it when it was done. I don't know how other people do rosettes from bottom to top with no gaps and a nice neat edge tho.
I like the owl, he looks like an owl, not creepy at all. I think you've done really, really well, much better than I did on my first tiered cake. icon_smile.gif

Thanks for the "tip" Vidutoit, I used a 1M but I'll try a 2D next time.

 

maisie73 yeah the bottom border jumped out at me and slapped me right in the face.   :ouch:

I had so badly damaged the bottom rosettes  while trying to put the top cake on.  I immediately did what I normally do, throw a border on it.  and thanks for being supportive. !!

MBalaska Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 6:37pm
post #19 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dayti 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by maisie73 

I don't know how other people do rosettes from bottom to top with no gaps and a nice neat edge tho.
 

You get gaps, but you fill them in with something :D This was a 6" x 4" before decorating, and I used a 1M tip, and I recall I put it on a 10" drum (which I should have decorated).

 

 

now THAT is fabulous Dayti, really nice!

reginaherrin Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 7:14pm
post #20 of 44

Whenever I do rosette cakes I always stack them before I pipe the rosettes on.  It is much easier and you won't damage it when trying to move it.

MBalaska Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 11:38pm
post #21 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by reginaherrin 
 

Whenever I do rosette cakes I always stack them before I pipe the rosettes on.  It is much easier and you won't damage it when trying to move it.

 

Thanks reginaherrin.  There is something so lovely about the rosette cakes,  I'll try that.

MBalaska Posted 28 Aug 2014 , 4:10am
post #22 of 44

Ok I'm having a big laugh at myself now.  It's done and over with, Whew.  I've put off trying to stack cakes for decades.

The cakes were level, and the straws held up like champions, and they were level.  Thank you for the honest, straight feedback, everyone. On to the next exciting adventure...........

Cheers,

mb

winniemog Posted 28 Aug 2014 , 4:42am
post #23 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by MBalaska 
 

On to the next exciting adventure...........

Cheers,

mb

 

 

Yes mb, you have a bus to catch....and don't forget your potato chips!

MBalaska Posted 28 Aug 2014 , 4:50am
post #24 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by winniemog 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBalaska 
 

On to the next exciting adventure...........

Cheers,

mb

 

 

Yes mb, you have a bus to catch....and don't forget your potato chips!

:lol:

Rohini Posted 31 Aug 2014 , 2:49pm
post #25 of 44

Hi!

 

Just wanted to say that the cake looks fine to me.....and personally I think the owl is cute!! And as importantly.....it sounds absolutely yummy!!!

MBalaska Posted 31 Aug 2014 , 6:03pm
post #26 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rohini 
 

Hi!

 

Just wanted to say that the cake looks fine to me.....and personally I think the owl is cute!! And as importantly.....it sounds absolutely yummy!!!

 

Thanks Rohini, you're very kind to be so supportive! It encourages me to keep trying.

 

Today I'll make more cake, and lots of SMBC and try it again.  The mission is to stack a cake, make it level, stack it neatly and evenly - with the rosette design.

So here comes attempt number two .....:cowboy: I've got to 'cowboy up' and keep trying until I get it.

cakebaby2 Posted 31 Aug 2014 , 7:10pm
post #27 of 44

Your cake is gorgeous and I love the little owl, and importantly sounds like it tasted great too.

Well done you Ms Alaska.

 

Incidentally...and its really of no importance you understand........is it true that the ladies of your fair state are outnumbered 4 to 1 by brutish lumberjacks, trawlermen and bio marine environmentalists?

I have a pin, a map and hope in my heart so thought i'd ask.....its for a friend? xx

-K8memphis Posted 31 Aug 2014 , 7:23pm
post #28 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by cakebaby2 

 

Incidentally...and its really of no importance you understand........is it true that the ladies of your fair state are outnumbered 4 to 1 by brutish lumberjacks, trawlermen and bio marine environmentalists?

I have a pin, a map and hope in my heart so thought i'd ask.....its for a friend? xx

 

 

:lol: 

MBalaska Posted 31 Aug 2014 , 7:45pm
post #29 of 44

Hmmmm well to be honest......be careful what you ask for.  sometimes quality is more important than quantity.  lol

 

However, it's often the case that women come up here with their husbands, who are searching for their Great Wilderness Adventure Frontier Style, and after one long dark cold 8 month winter the wives go home - with or without their dear hubbies. 

 

And the often heard......."Alaska, where the men are men, and the women are too."  :razz:   Go for it, there's plenty of room for everyone.

Rohini Posted 1 Sep 2014 , 4:17pm
post #30 of 44

Quote:

Originally Posted by MBalaska 
 

 

Thanks Rohini, you're very kind to be so supportive! It encourages me to keep trying.

 

Today I'll make more cake, and lots of SMBC and try it again.  The mission is to stack a cake, make it level, stack it neatly and evenly - with the rosette design.

So here comes attempt number two .....:cowboy: I've got to 'cowboy up' and keep trying until I get it.


You're most welcome :) Waiting to see number two!!

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