Finally Leaving The Bakery..

Business By TheItalianBaker Updated 28 Aug 2014 , 6:06pm by Cevamal

TheItalianBaker Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 1:58pm
post #1 of 20

I finally decided to leave the bakery I work for, so I gave 2 weeks notice last monday. My last day will be next Sunday.

I have few customers ordering cakes, cupcakes and cookies for the next months, people that even had cake tastings. 

My boss told me to keep on taking orders but these people won't have the same products because all the recipes are mine and, of course, I'm not going to leave them at the bakery.

(long story short, the new owner of the bakery doesn't bake or cook, so when she got the place she hired me to take care of it, that's why I was using all my recipes)

Should I tell customers I'm not going to work on their order?

After a year, a big part of them are regulars, they come back because the product is good and for my skills.

I don't even know if I'll be replaced, I wasn't working much anyways, I worked less then 35hours last 2 weeks. So what should I do?  This is a small community..

19 replies
-K8memphis Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 2:23pm
post #2 of 20

do what she says-- she's still your boss --i would just proceed as usual and not let on in advance about your departure -- you don't want to impact her business flow --sounds like that might happen just in the natural progression of things but she may find a replacement-- so keep it as positive as possible -- no burnt bridges --

 

have you protected your recipes? she does/did not have access to them?

 

i am happy for you--  you just seem itching to burst out and bake the world -- i'm glad you can concentrate your efforts now --

 

congrats, tib!

Norasmom Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 3:33pm
post #3 of 20

You do not and should not tell your customers anything, as it is not your business.  When word gets out that you have left, those customers will find you.  The internet is a beautiful thing.  I have hunted down many a hairdresser…

 

Hopefully the business owner has a plan in action.  

buttercreamqueenbee Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 6:03pm
post #4 of 20

AJust start your own business as long as you didnt sign a non compete clause. Your good. Start a Fb page customers will find you

TheItalianBaker Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 6:13pm
post #5 of 20

A

Original message sent by buttercreamqueenbee

Just start your own business as long as you didnt sign a non compete clause. Your good. Start a Fb page customers will find you

This is not the problem. Customers often aske who is going to decorate the cake because they want to talk right to that person. I don't want to say it's going to be me if it's not true because if they deliver a bad cake it's going to be on me!

-K8memphis Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 6:25pm
post #6 of 20

it's not on you if you're not there, tib ;)

 

can you say, "i'm not positive who'll be on duty then, could be me could be someone else -- just don't know for sure"

 

i'd do my best to keep this as simple as possible -- because i would want a real clear record of me not trying in any way to influence her customers to follow me --

 

or if all else fails -- advise your boss that customers are putting you on the spot about it and how does she want you to handle it -- 

-K8memphis Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 6:33pm
post #7 of 20

Quote:

Originally Posted by -K8memphis 
 

i'd do my best to keep this as simple as possible -- because i would want a real clear record of me not trying in any way to influence her customers to follow me --

 

 

 not that you're trying to do that either i'm just saying, i've made my departure from many places along the way and that's just something important -- not even the hint of impropriety -- and if she tells you to tell them it won't be you doing their cake  'cause you're leaving then you've opened pandora's box -- and it becomes all about you and that's not a healthy place to be --

-K8memphis Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 6:41pm
post #8 of 20

most places get the security guard or the super and escort you out of the building when you give notice and plan to become competition or go to work for the competition-- so idk small community like you said i guess -- so word will get around -- mum's the word otherwise

Dayti Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 11:45pm
post #9 of 20

I would definitely ask her how she wants you to handle the customers' enquiries. You should not have to lie to customers, but tell her to tell you what to tell them. She may be planning on taking someone else on if she wants you to keep taking the orders, but ultimately the customers have a right to know who will be making their cake if they outright ask you. 

TheItalianBaker Posted 24 Aug 2014 , 12:59am
post #10 of 20

I'm pretty sure she is not going to replace me, it has been already a week since I gave my notice and there are no posts on craiglist or people coming for training.

 

The other pastry chef is going to make this cakes I guess, she also said she wants to call me for some complicated orders and she will pay me per cake. WHAT????? oh sure, I will come.. sure.. if I will have time.. not!!!!!

 

anyways, K8memphis, yes my recipes are always with me in my book, always in my purse and they are in italian, in grams too! Plus I'm a very bad handwriter lol

liz at sugar Posted 24 Aug 2014 , 1:49am
post #11 of 20

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheItalianBaker 
yes my recipes are always with me in my book, always in my purse and they are in italian, in grams too! Plus I'm a very bad handwriter lol

 

This is my favorite part of this story. :)

 

Good luck to you!

 

Liz

costumeczar Posted 24 Aug 2014 , 8:19pm
post #12 of 20

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheItalianBaker 
 

 

(long story short, the new owner of the bakery doesn't bake or cook...

 

...I don't even know if I'll be replaced, I wasn't working much anyways, I worked less then 35hours last 2 weeks. So what should I do?  This is a small community..

What I'm wondering about is this part of it. The owner doesn't bake, and might not replace you, so how is it even a bakery? What are they going to sell? You've piqued my curiosity!

TheItalianBaker Posted 25 Aug 2014 , 2:42am
post #13 of 20

Quote:

Originally Posted by costumeczar 
 

What I'm wondering about is this part of it. The owner doesn't bake, and might not replace you, so how is it even a bakery? What are they going to sell? You've piqued my curiosity!

 

She used to be a manager for a couple of restaurants in town, then got this bakery that changed in bistro AND bakery. She hired chef, kitchen staff and 1 pastry chefs.

One takes care of croissant, brioches, quiches, a couple of desserts and some prep for the kitchen. 

I'm the other pastry chef, I take care of all the cakes, desserts, truffles, cookies, special orders and meeting with customers. Before me she used to meet with customers and take care of the orders, the pastry chef used to work A LOT to take care of all the desserts but he didn't try any new recipes, probably because he didn't have any time left! 

embersmom Posted 26 Aug 2014 , 12:23am
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheItalianBaker 
 

 

She used to be a manager for a couple of restaurants in town, then got this bakery that changed in bistro AND bakery. She hired chef, kitchen staff and 1 pastry chefs.

One takes care of croissant, brioches, quiches, a couple of desserts and some prep for the kitchen. 

I'm the other pastry chef, I take care of all the cakes, desserts, truffles, cookies, special orders and meeting with customers. Before me she used to meet with customers and take care of the orders, the pastry chef used to work A LOT to take care of all the desserts but he didn't try any new recipes, probably because he didn't have any time left! 


If nobody has been hired to take your place...8O  I feel badly for the other pastry chef.

 

As others said, it's not your problem.  And I'd definitely ask her how to handle those customer inquiries.

Mel37 Posted 26 Aug 2014 , 10:23am
post #15 of 20

AI do think you need to speak to your boss and find out what she wants you to say, if customers are asking you directly if you will be making their cake, then you really can't lie or give them an indication that it may be you, when you know that it definitely won't be. She needs to come up with an honest answer that you can use. Something along the lines of 'unfortunately I am not working that week, but my good colleague xxxxxxx will be taking care of this for you' I would think would be the best answer?

Loads of luck in your new venture though! :)

TheItalianBaker Posted 26 Aug 2014 , 11:15pm
post #16 of 20

AWell, last 5 days! I asked her about what to say, it seems like the other pastry chef is going to make all the work.

She also asked for my recipes!! Heck no!! Can you explain him how to make this cake? Nope! Can you come and make this cake next month? Are you kidding me? No! Then she said I'm not professional..

Cevamal Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 12:27am
post #17 of 20

ADid you tell her "I learned it by watching you!"?

MimiFix Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 12:46am
post #18 of 20

What a mess. OP, you've posted several times in other threads about problems with your boss and I have clearly understood you don't like her. It's unfortunate that there continues to be great animosity, with no communication between the two of you.

 

We have an expression here: "You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar." In other words, go forth and be kind. Your new business will thank you.

TheItalianBaker Posted 28 Aug 2014 , 3:20am
post #19 of 20

A

Original message sent by Cevamal

Did you tell her "I learned it by watching you!"?

I know but after 1 year I'm so sick and tired of these things I choose to walk away like she didn't say anything at all! I already got a big order for September from an ex customer of the bakery.. Karma.. is coming back!!

Cevamal Posted 28 Aug 2014 , 6:06pm
post #20 of 20

A(I didn't really mean you should say it... It's a line from an anti drug commercial from eons ago. My husband and I say it all the time. :-D}

Glad you're getting out!

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