Help With Cake Icing.

Decorating By bostonterrierlady Updated 23 Aug 2014 , 1:23pm by FrostedMoon

bostonterrierlady Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 1:56am
post #1 of 5

AI have a question about my experience with this cake. I do this as a hobby for friends. I took this cake to the place where the party was. I was embarrassed when I left. I hope I can explain this right so I can get some help. I used Sharon's recipe. Except used Crisco. Got a pretty smooth icing. When I got it out in natural light it was real off white. Not as smooth as I would have liked. Every flaw showed. Even some chocolate cake showed through. Just barely. When I stacked the cake it messed up the icing more than I would have liked. Wish I could explain better but the light in my kitchen hid a lot of the flaws. The flower and the petals were great. Any help? Thought about going back to hi ratio but it is probable be done away soon. Would love some advice.

4 replies
MBalaska Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 2:09am
post #3 of 5

Did you also watch Sharon Z's 'buttercream' DVD.  If you followed her tutorial, you'll not have any cake showing through ever.

bostonterrierlady Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 2:43am
post #4 of 5

AYes that's the one. Yes I have watched it numerous times.

FrostedMoon Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 1:23pm
post #5 of 5

I'm not familiar with that recipe, but if you used any butter or natural (brown) extract, that will make the frosting off white.  Crisco shouldn't have effected the color, just the mouth feel.  Personally I prefer an off-white cake with natural flavor than a snow white cake with imitation, but that's just me.


As far as cake showing through, that just means the frosting was too thin in some areas.  I follow the cake board when I frost a cake, but that also means I often have to trim the cake down to make sure there is space between the edge of the cake and the cake board. As far as messing up the buttercream when stacking, I try to chill or freeze (for 15-20 min) my cakes so the buttercream is firm when I stack them.  That way there is less smushing from fingers as you stack and straighten them.


I've had the situation where my cake looks awesome inside, and then I take it to sunlight and you can see flaws.  It's the nature of indoor electric light vs sunlight.  I even take cakes to different parts of my kitchen so I can see how different light sources affect it.  Tough to do much more than that, other than taking it outside as you frost.


Hope that helps  

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