Ganache - 2Nd Attempt

Decorating By sweetnaomi Updated 25 Aug 2014 , 5:39pm by cai0311

sweetnaomi Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 2:20pm
post #1 of 6

My first attempt went so well, up until I went to cover it with fondant - before doing so I brushed it with hot water but I suppose I left water drops and it just went downhill from there.  Thus, my mission to make a simple fondant cake that isn't lumpy ensues....

 

So, that was my test cake.....this one has to go right as my son's party is tomorrow!  I ganached it last night and will cover with fondant today.  Wish me luck!  But I have some basic questions about the process in general...

 

- I 'glued' my cake board to the spin table thing with ganache and did the same to the cake to the cake board.  I even let it set for a few minutes but even so, once I'm ganaching, everything is sliding all over the place.  Is it just me being a little too heavy handed??

 

- how do you put your cakes in the freezer/fridge (to harden up ganache) without getting chocolate EVERYWHERE?? 

 

That's it for now.  :)  Any other tips for covering with fondant will be appreciated as that's happening tonight!!  Btw, it's just a little 6" cake.  Something that you pro's can likely do blindfolded!!

5 replies
cai0311 Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 3:09pm
post #2 of 6

AI ice all my fondant covered cakes with ganache. This is what I do:

I ice the cake board with ganache to "glue" the cake to the board. The I fill the cake as I usually would. Once filled I cover the cake with saran wrap and refrigerate overnight. This allows the cake to settle and the cake to come really glued to the board.

The next day I unwrap my cakes and trim any cake away that overhangs or is close to the edge of the cake board. The allows me to use the cake board as my guide for perfectly iced straight sides. Once trimmed I tape the cake to my spin table (I fold packing tape over so it is sticky on both sides) and begin to apply the ganache for the crumb coat. Followed by icing with ganache normally. When I am finished icing the cake and it is perfectly smooth, I place the cake in the fridge anywhere from a couple hours to overnight depending on my decorating schedule.

When I have my fondant rolled out (I roll my fondant super thin to 1/16" thick) I take the cake out of the fridge. The condensation that forms on the cake is enough to make the fondant stick to the icing. I don't add any more water to the cake. Too much water and your fondant will "leak" out the bottom of the cake.

Not getting chocolate everywhere takes practice. When I first started decorating cakes I would have ganache and buttercream from head to toe and all over my kitchen. Now, after years of practice, I am quick, clean and effecient. That will come in time for you too.

livforcake Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 5:08pm
post #3 of 6

Quote:

Originally Posted by sweetnaomi 

 

 

- how do you put your cakes in the freezer/fridge (to harden up ganache) without getting chocolate EVERYWHERE?? 

 

 

For the small size of cake you're doing, I would just put it in a cake carrier. That way it's protected and you don't have to worry about it. Of course, that assume's you have ROOM in your fridge for one :).

 

I also use ganache to glue the cake to the cake board and then tape it to the spin table like cai0311 said. Once ganached, I pop it off the spin table and into a cake carrier. Again, this assumes it's a smaller one tier cake. 

MKC Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 9:04pm
post #4 of 6

Atry their technique for getting the cake on the board.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=agk2yPCnA-g&list=PLyDaS4napa7fevZ2b2vFcKbkkTh7N7gm7

rooneygirl Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 9:32pm
post #5 of 6

Hi, I use only ganache under my fondant and it took me a while to keep it clean and get comfortable with it. Here is a quick overview of what I do - for the most part, I only use room temperature white chocolate ganache  - this is cleaner, lighter in flavor, and if you have to pull your fondant off and reroll it then you don't have dark chocolate all over it.  I place a dab of ganache on the cake board and build my cake on it. I cover in plastic wrap and place another cake board on top of that and 1-2lb butter bars depending on the size of the cake - i refrigerate for 1-3 hours (depending on time I have) -remove from fridge and remove butter and plastic-  I do a crumb coat of ganache - chill for 5-10 minutes (usually I'm crumb coating the next cake at this time) - then I place a dollop of warmed up ganache (in microwave for less than 10 sec - you want it softer than room temp but not  too runny or the oils will seep out of it and you have to remix), smooth it out, then place another cake board on top of that (use waxed cardboards for best results, and wet the board with water or vodka), use a small level on the cake and line the top board with bottom board, chill again until the top board in stuck in place, finish ganaching the cake by building the ganache out to the two boards and using your pallet knife or bench scraper pressed against the two boards and pull the excess ganache away - do this until you have a smooth cake - chill overnight or as long as you have until the ganache is rock solid - roll fondant thin, grab your cake out of fridge, and drape the cake - as you smooth the fondant on the cake, the cake condensation will occur helping you to stick the fondant to the cake (or you can use a little vodka on the surface of the cake to - I like this because it evaporates!  Hope that is helpful and practice makes perfect.

cai0311 Posted 25 Aug 2014 , 5:39pm
post #6 of 6

A

Quote:
Originally Posted by rooneygirl 

I only use room temperature white chocolate ganache  - this is cleaner, lighter in flavor, and if you have to pull your fondant off and reroll it then you don't have dark chocolate all over it.

 

I only use white chocolate ganache too for the same reasons.

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