Cake Board

Decorating By coloradocache Updated 6 Sep 2014 , 8:52pm by Butnerbarn

coloradocache Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 1:43am
post #1 of 22

I always use a plate or cake stand to set my cake on that I make for my family  but I have a customer order for a cake and don't want to spend a lot of $ on the cake base that I'll never get returned and the client won't appreciate or use again.  What should I use to place my cake on - a cake board or cake drum (which is a lot more expense)?  And I see such clever patterns cakes sit on that seem to match the theme of the cake - is there a class to teach how to accentuate your cake?  Do I use regular wrapping paper or heavier scrap board paper to cover the board/drum?  Do you glue it down?  Appreciate your help!

21 replies
denetteb Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 2:15am
post #2 of 22

A single cake cardboard isn't stiff enough.  A cake drum would be fine, you just have to add the cost on to the customer, included in the cost of the cake.  Sorry, can't help with your questions about decorating the board, I am a hobbyist and my cakes go out on clear glass cake plates I have picked up at thrift stores.

vldutoit Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 10:51am
post #3 of 22

AYou can double and even triple your cardboard rounds by hot gluing them together. Then wrap the them in fancifoil or cover it in fondant. Trim the edge with ribbon with hot glue. The heavier the cake, the more rounds you will need. If you do many cakes for non family, it would be less expensive to order drums from oasissupply.com or another on line source.

winniemog Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 10:56am
post #4 of 22

AI always cover my cake drums to accent the cake, nearly always with fondant. You can add all sorts of fondant decor to the board to suit the cake, or just use a matching or contrasting fondant colour. Just think about the cake board as part of the planning when designing your cake. It's a lot of fun to decorate more than just the cake!

Just once I've used contact paper to cover the drum, when I wanted black and white checkerboard pattern on a 16" square board and I couldn't bear the thought of trying to make the perfect squares line up exactly!

coloradocache Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 11:10am
post #5 of 22

Thanks to all of you for your suggestions - I never thought of covering the boards with fondant!  That's perfect and I love the thrift store idea! 

denetteb Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 1:17pm
post #6 of 22

I have also used glass microwave turn tables from the thrift store for cakes.

FrostedMoon Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 1:31pm
post #7 of 22

I too use cake drums.  You can usually get them for less money at ACMoore or Michael's if you use a coupon.  Fondant on top and ribbon around the side is a great option, but if you do decide to cover it with something else, please make sure it is food safe.  You can't use just wrapping paper without covering it with something else that is food safe.  Fondant is definitely easiest.

cai0311 Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 3:13pm
post #8 of 22

AI use cake drums on all my cakes. Even non decorated ones look professional and hold the weight of large cakes easily. If I decorate the cake drum I charge extra to cover the materials and time needed.

coloradocache Posted 24 Aug 2014 , 10:29pm
post #9 of 22

Microwave turn tables - you go girl!!!  I didn't realize Michaels carried cake drums... definitely going to check both options out! 

 

Thanks so much

bikemom3 Posted 25 Aug 2014 , 2:22am
post #10 of 22

AYou could also use 1/2" foam board. Sometimes the dollar store carries it but I usually buy @ my craft store and I use that 40% coupon. That way it costs about $2.50 for a poster board size piece that I can get 2 12" rounds from. Just cut out with a utility knife and cover with fondant or fancy foil. Hope this helps:D

MKC Posted 25 Aug 2014 , 12:49pm
post #11 of 22

AJust a few of tricks when you cover a board with fondant:

- add some tylose or some gumpaste to your fondant. This way the fondant will be nice and dry when you place your cake.

- let your fondant dry for a couple of days before using. This way you will avoid any indentations if you need to adjust your cake on the board.

- only use a thin coat of fondant on the board. It will dry faster and you won't be wasting fondant. My fondant is about 1/8 to 1/16 in thick on my boards.

coloradocache Posted 25 Aug 2014 , 7:33pm
post #12 of 22

Thanks for the suggestions - I always make sure to use those coupons - saving every little bit sure helps.

 

Covering the board with fondant makes sense - I always have some left over that I don't know what to do with.

winniemog Posted 25 Aug 2014 , 8:31pm
post #13 of 22

A

Original message sent by coloradocache

Covering the board with fondant makes sense - I always have some left over that I don't know what to do with.

Yes, but do what MKC suggests and cover the board in advance - I usually cover it a few days ahead, with a very thin layer. That way you won't damage the board when you adjust the cake.

You can of course just cover the exposed board at the end if use wish to use the leftover fondant, but I get a better finish doing the whole board- I guess I need to practise the other method more!

coloradocache Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 1:25am
post #14 of 22

Thanks winniemog, I got ahead of myself when I posted my reply, I can see where letting the fondant dry ahead of time would make placing the cake easier..

 

I so appreciate everyone's help!

Bunny0410 Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 2:00am
post #15 of 22

Sorry, but what is a cake drum?

Can someone post a pic for me?

 

(I did try the search tool first, everyone talks about cake drums, but I cannot see a picture, it may be that we call them something different here in Oz?).

 

Thanks

winniemog Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 2:21am
post #16 of 22

AIt's the thicker silver-covered board you can buy from cake decorating shops. The thin cardboard boards go under each cake tier, and then you place the whole cake on the thicker board (which is probably some type of manufactured timber I guess?), which you can buy in 4mm or 6mm thicknesses - I use the thicker drums for multi tier or very large cakes to support their greater weight.

Bunny0410 Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 2:28am
post #17 of 22

Thank you winniemog.

Quote:
Originally Posted by winniemog 

It's the thicker silver-covered board you can buy from cake decorating shops. The thin cardboard boards go under each cake tier, and then you place the whole cake on the thicker board (which is probably some type of manufactured timber I guess?), which you can buy in 4mm or 6mm thicknesses - I use the thicker drums for multi tier or very large cakes to support their greater weight.

Thank you Winniemog, I thought it was going to be a terminology thing. I know them as MDF Boards.

;-D

 

I am constantly doing searches on things people are referring to, these posts are easier to read when you understand all the lingo.

Lcubed82 Posted 27 Aug 2014 , 3:00pm
post #18 of 22

The MDF boards are great.  I always want mine back thought!

 

Cake drums are usually more like this following:

 

http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E31A373-475A-BAC0-5894BDEBFE84A837&killnav=1

 

I think these are actually layers of the cake circles already stacked and covered with fancy foil.  Using a coupon at Michaels or Hobby Lobby, it's probably not any more expensive to buy these than to stack, glue and cover the thinner boards yourself.

Butnerbarn Posted 5 Sep 2014 , 6:25pm
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by winniemog View Post
 
You can of course just cover the exposed board at the end if use wish to use the leftover fondant, but I get a better finish doing the whole board-

 

I have a rather dumb question as I enjoy this as a hobby for my family and  close friends.  When you cover the whole board with fondant does that mean you cover the entire bottom of the cake board as well?  If so, how to you get it to adhere to the bottom of the board?  Does it adhere when it's completely dry or is water / RI used to "glue" it?  Thanks in advance! 

MKC Posted 5 Sep 2014 , 8:01pm
post #20 of 22

You cover just the top with a dab of water/shortening/piping gel.

denetteb Posted 6 Sep 2014 , 4:01am
post #21 of 22

You don't need to cover the bottom of the board, only the part you will see.  Some people don't cover the part where the cake will sit so they don't use as much fondant, some just cover the whole top even though the cake will sit on it.

Butnerbarn Posted 6 Sep 2014 , 8:52pm
post #22 of 22

AAwesome - thanks for clarification! I believe I will give that a try for something different :)

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