Rose Nail Vs. Pan Wrapping; Comparison

Decorating By shellielatham Updated 23 Aug 2014 , 3:30am by MBalaska

shellielatham Posted 19 Aug 2014 , 3:21pm
post #1 of 23

I only recently discovered the wrapping your pan to get the cake to bake evenly and flat on top.  I then read, on here, about the rose nail method.  So today I tried both to compare methods.  I can post pics if anyone is interested.  My experience is: nail cooks faster but still had the dome shape on top- wrapped is flat but takes considerably more time to bake.  Anyone else have any experiences to share?

22 replies
Kadesan Posted 19 Aug 2014 , 4:48pm
post #2 of 23

Quote:

Originally Posted by shellielatham 
 

I only recently discovered the wrapping your pan to get the cake to bake evenly and flat on top.  I then read, on here, about the rose nail method.  So today I tried both to compare methods.  I can post pics if anyone is interested.  My experience is: nail cooks faster but still had the dome shape on top- wrapped is flat but takes considerably more time to bake.  Anyone else have any experiences to share?


Yes please; kindly post pictures. It would be interesting to know :smile:

cai0311 Posted 19 Aug 2014 , 4:51pm
post #3 of 23

AI don't do either. I bake my cakes at 325 degrees. Bake flat everytime.

mattyeatscakes Posted 19 Aug 2014 , 5:21pm
post #4 of 23

AI do both! Lol overkill! :)

MBalaska Posted 19 Aug 2014 , 5:36pm
post #5 of 23

Quote:

Originally Posted by mattyeatscakes 

I do both! Lol overkill! icon_smile.gif

 

Me too mattyeatscakes.

shellielatham Posted 19 Aug 2014 , 7:16pm
post #6 of 23

 

 

 

 

shellielatham Posted 19 Aug 2014 , 7:17pm
post #7 of 23

I just use a strip of an old towel doubled and all I had hand was a piece of ribbon to secure it.

MBalaska Posted 19 Aug 2014 , 9:53pm
post #8 of 23

To avoid any fire danger, put the wet towel in a piece of foil and secure with big metal paperclip or bulldog clip.

pucina Posted 20 Aug 2014 , 12:31pm
post #9 of 23

AI do both as well with great results.

kkmcmahan Posted 20 Aug 2014 , 12:53pm
post #10 of 23

I always use the bake strips and for cakes over 8 inches also use the nail.  The strips keep from doming and the nail helps with baking the center.

shellielatham Posted 20 Aug 2014 , 1:02pm
post #11 of 23

After my little experiment yesterday I think the nail and the strips both serve a purpose.  I think the strips help with the doming and the nail helps them cook more evenly.  So not really overkill.  

 

Side note, I baked another set of cakes yesterday after the nail/strips experiment.  I did 325 like another poster mentioned.  I still had domes.  

 

I just flipped them over to flatten the dome.  But alas my cakes were sticky and the stops tore off :( I still wrapped them and froze them tho. I'm sure I can fill in with frosting and still use the cakes.

cai0311 Posted 21 Aug 2014 , 12:57pm
post #12 of 23

A

Quote:
Originally Posted by shellielatham 

Side note, I baked another set of cakes yesterday after the nail/strips experiment.  I did 325 like another poster mentioned.  I still had domes.

 

I forgot to mention that I have a convection, which makes a huge difference when baking. With the convection oven just baking at 325 degrees makes perfect, flat cakes every time.

shellielatham Posted 21 Aug 2014 , 1:30pm
post #13 of 23

Ahhh...that probably makes quite a difference.  Thanks for the additional info.

Jeff_Arnett Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 6:43pm
post #14 of 23

I do both if the cake is 10 inches or larger.....

shellielatham Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 8:55pm
post #15 of 23

I think I'm going to try both with the next cakes I do.  It makes sense to me.

cake4court Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 1:02am
post #16 of 23

what is the flower nail method? just stick it in there?

Apti Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 1:35am
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by cake4court 
 

what is the flower nail method? just stick it in there?


Use a metal flower nail, turn it upside down so the pointy end is pointed toward the ceiling, center it in the pan and pour in your batter.

 

Use more nails for larger cakes.

 

cake4court Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 1:38am
post #18 of 23

hmmm thanks I will try that next time, I haven't had much luck with wrapping or 325 :/

MBalaska Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 2:35am
post #19 of 23

Rose nail and Wilton baking strips for these cakes...........nothing wasted, no darkened edges, flat as a pancake.  Since it's baking fun for me, I'm happy to take the extra step to get great results.

 

http://www.cakecentral.com/g/i/3278578/yellow-cake-baked-with-both-flower-nails-and-wilton-bake-strips-outside-flat-as-a-pancake-and-baked-thoroughly/sort/display_order/

MBalaska Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 2:38am
post #20 of 23

Greasing the flower/rose nail helps it to just pop out of the cooked cake.

cake4court Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 3:06am
post #21 of 23

oh good tip thanks!

MBalaska Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 3:12am
post #22 of 23

if you click on the photothat apti posted above, you can see the grease on her nail.

MBalaska Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 3:30am
post #23 of 23

When I have a really thick cake batter, I start filling the pan like this, working around the nails and smoothing with a spatula.

 

metal rose nail placed in a thick cake batter.

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