Painting Drop Strings?

Decorating By HannahsMomi Updated 22 Aug 2014 , 5:23pm by gscout73

HannahsMomi Posted 18 Aug 2014 , 6:18pm
post #1 of 17

OK...I have a wedding cake coming up which will be a buttercream covered cake and it will have drop strings going around each tier of the cake.  The bride would like the drop strings to be shiny silver.  I'm assuming the best thing to do is to pipe the strings with royal icing and them paint them with luster dust mixed with vodka.  Am I on the right track here?  I'm a little concerned that the drop strings are going to break while I am trying to paint them....Is there a less frustrating way to do this?  I've heard of using piping gel mixed with silver dust for piping, but I'm assuming that would be a horrible consistency for drop strings?  Any help/advice would be greatly appreciated!!!!

16 replies
Siany01 Posted 18 Aug 2014 , 6:34pm
post #2 of 17

APersonally I would colour the royal icing grey and then dust with a pearl lustre dust to make it silver. If you paint liquid on royal icing it's going to melt. Have a play with it till you get the right colour grey for the silver.

HannahsMomi Posted 18 Aug 2014 , 6:42pm
post #3 of 17


If I dust it with the dry lustre wouldn't get all over the cake though?  It's going to be a white buttercream cake....

AZCouture Posted 18 Aug 2014 , 6:49pm
post #4 of 17

ANo it's not going to melt, you were exactly correct with your method, Hannah. I paint RI with vodka and color dust all the time, and there is no melting. Yiu certainly don't soak it, brush a light layer on.

Siany01 Posted 18 Aug 2014 , 6:54pm
post #5 of 17

AYou would certainly need to be very careful but if you are using a crusting buttercream you could cover the just under where you are dusting and just use a tiny amount at t time.

Just reading another post has made me think of this, have you thought of using silver cake lace? I have seen it piped to make a netting for a pirate ship cake and I'm thinking that maybe you could use it to pipe drop lines. It would be a total experiment but I can think why it wouldn't work. You would need to pipe it and leave it overnight to set up but I think it could work quite well. Oh got me thinking now lol

Siany01 Posted 18 Aug 2014 , 6:55pm
post #6 of 17

A

Original message sent by AZCouture

No it's not going to melt, you were exactly correct with your method, Hannah. I paint RI with vodka and color dust all the time, and there is no melting. Yiu certainly don't soak it, brush a light layer on.

I stand corrected, listen to this lady, she is cake awesomeness :)

HannahsMomi Posted 18 Aug 2014 , 7:01pm
post #7 of 17

Thanks, AZ!  I'm just dreading doing it that way because I know there may be some breakage involved!:lol:  I foresee much frustration in my future...

HannahsMomi Posted 18 Aug 2014 , 7:02pm
post #8 of 17

Siany...thanks so much for your responses!  Cake lace?  I may have to check that out.  I've not done that before...

Lfredden Posted 18 Aug 2014 , 11:44pm
post #9 of 17

AHave you done royal icing stringwork on buttercream before? I was taught that it wouldn't work, royal icing will melt on the cream. Was I misinformed?

winniemog Posted 19 Aug 2014 , 1:24am
post #10 of 17

AI haven't personally tried drop strings on buttercream, but it should be fine. Royal icing only "melts" (technically it dissolves) in the presence of water. Buttercream should be pretty high in fat and should have the excess water that might dissolve the RI. I don't think I would put the finished cake in the fridge though, but then I don't put regular fondant cakes in the fridge and I know many from the USA do that.

Sorry to get all scientific about it, but in the absence of experience, sometimes it helps!

And as AZ says, no issue painting the drop strings, don't use bucketloads of colour/paint. The issue will be more the physical damage from painting because those suckers are so delicate,

HannahsMomi Posted 19 Aug 2014 , 12:33pm
post #11 of 17

Yes, I have done royal icing stringwork on buttercream before.  It works just fine.  I always let my buttercream crust well first though.  And like minniewog says, I don't put the cake in the refrigerator.  I am worried about painting and then damaging the drop strings, then having to do it over....There may be some bad language during this portion of the decorating!

HannahsMomi Posted 19 Aug 2014 , 1:06pm
post #12 of 17

So, since I have to paint the drop strings, if I use buttercream for the strings and let them crust....would I be able to paint the buttercream strings with lustre dust/vodka?  I guess I've been assuming they would break too easily....

That's why I thought I'd pipe in RI

gscout73 Posted 21 Aug 2014 , 12:54am
post #13 of 17

I highly recommend practicing. Please don't wait until you are working on your ordered cake. By the time you are ready to make and decorate that cake it will take confidence to have a steady hand.

bubs1stbirthday Posted 21 Aug 2014 , 1:25am
post #14 of 17

I haven't done it personally but I have heard of people putting glycerine in their RI mix so as to make it less fragile to work with - maybe look into that? 

HannahsMomi Posted 21 Aug 2014 , 7:18pm
post #15 of 17

Absolutely!  I always practice things I haven't tried before I do them on a wedding cake.  I did some buttercream drop strings yesterday and let them crust, then tried painting them.  It worked!  I think I will go this :lol: route!

HannahsMomi Posted 21 Aug 2014 , 7:19pm
post #16 of 17

Thanks, bubs!  I will have to remember that for my RI stringwork in the future!  There is always something new to learn, isn't there?

gscout73 Posted 22 Aug 2014 , 5:23pm
post #17 of 17

Quote:

Originally Posted by HannahsMomi 
 

Absolutely!  I always practice things I haven't tried before I do them on a wedding cake.  I did some buttercream drop strings yesterday and let them crust, then tried painting them.  It worked!  I think I will go this :lol: route!


I wish you all the best! Make sure to post a pic when you're done so we can see how they came out.

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