Freezing Cakes

Decorating By ashleyj Updated 23 Aug 2014 , 4:55am by ailika

ashleyj Posted 14 Aug 2014 , 10:42pm
post #1 of 11

Hello to all the fabulous cake pro's on this site! I have torted, filled, crumb coated, and frozen my cake tiers in order to save on time. At what point can I ice them once I remove them from the freezer? Wasn't sure if they need to sit out for a bit or if I can ice them right away.

Thank You!!

10 replies
kakeladi Posted 14 Aug 2014 , 10:58pm
post #2 of 11

I iced a fzn cake only once because I had major problem doing so.  It is the one and only time I had icing fall off the cake in big sheets.  So for over 15 yrs I never iced another fzn cake.

ashleyj Posted 14 Aug 2014 , 11:03pm
post #3 of 11

Oh no. I've read several posts where people freeze cakes in advance.

ibeeflower Posted 15 Aug 2014 , 12:40am
post #4 of 11

I think it depends on the kind of frosting you use. I freeze my cakes often but I use mainly SMBC. I do let the cakes thaw a bit before frosting and have never had an issue.

 

The last time I did a crusting buttercream I let the cake thaw in the fridge in the morning and in the afternoon I was able to frost it.

luvmykids2bits Posted 15 Aug 2014 , 12:50am
post #5 of 11

I use a crusting buttercream mainly and I frost my cakes when they are partially thawed.  Usually the centre is frozen and the outside is thawed by cold.  I find if it's completely thawed the buttercream pulls off way too many crumbs, and if it's completely frozen the icing won't stick very well.

kakeladi Posted 15 Aug 2014 , 9:19pm
post #6 of 11

.........read several posts where people freeze cakes in advance.............

 

Oh I fz cakes all the time BUT........always let them defrost before icing them.

And for the record, yes, I had used crusting b'cream on that one cake.  Have no idea if that made a difference or not as I never tried again & it was more than 30 yrs ago :)

Apti Posted 15 Aug 2014 , 10:16pm
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ashleyj 
 

Hello to all the fabulous cake pro's on this site! I have torted, filled, crumb coated, and frozen my cake tiers in order to save on time. At what point can I ice them once I remove them from the freezer? Wasn't sure if they need to sit out for a bit or if I can ice them right away.

Thank You!!


Not a pro (4 year hobby baker).  Personally, I would let them completely defrost (like overnight) before removing the cake from the plastic wrap/aluminum foil/box in which it was frozen.  If you did NOT wrap the cake tiers,  you have an opportunity to wrap the cakes in plastic wrap and aluminum foil and to place them immediately back into the freezer.

 

In theory, the condensation that will occur as the cake returns to room temperature will condense on the wrapping, not the crumb coat.

 

My story is exactly like kakeladi's.  I use a crusting buttercream made with shortening and butter.  I tried an experiment about 2 years ago to see what happens when a torted, filled, crumb-coated cake is frozen un-wrapped.  It did not turn out well.

 

When I took it out two days later and placed it on the counter for defrosting and final decorating with buttercream, the cake shed water like the pilot in the 70's movie Airplane.

 

http://fogsmoviereviews.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/airplane_robert_hays_ted_striker_sweating_profusely.png

 

I have problems with stamina when making large cake projects, so I use my manual defrost upright freezer as my best-est cake friend!  I wrap my frozen layers (I tort after defrosting) in plastic wrap and aluminum foil with a cardboard cake circle under each layer.  I leave them out on my kitchen counter to defrost (not enough room to defrost in the refrigerator) for a minimum of 2 hours or overnight.

kakeladi Posted 17 Aug 2014 , 3:18am
post #8 of 11

.........When I took it out two days later and placed it on the counter for defrosting....the cake shed water....

 

Yes, any cake most likely will sweat if taken from a freezer into a warm &/or humid room. This is why most of the time one is advised to take the cake out of the fzr several hours before needing to work on it.   It can go from fzr to frig or directly onto your counter - makes little difference as long as it is given time for temp adjustments.

  Just let it sit until the cake temp adjusts to the room temp and it will dry up and no one will know there was any sweating.  Just be sure not to touch it.

ailika Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 4:00am
post #9 of 11

Do we keep it wrapped up in the plastic wrap or aluminum foil to defrost or do I have remove the wrapping before?

kakeladi Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 4:22am
post #10 of 11

If they are wrapped in plastic wrap leave wrapped as they defrost.

A cake should never be wrapped in foil unless it is 1st wrapped in plastic.

I prefer to unwrap out of the foil (in fact I seldom use foil).

ailika Posted 23 Aug 2014 , 4:55am
post #11 of 11


Okay I thought they'd have be wrapped in both. Thank you  :-)

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