Kentucky Cottage Food Law Petition

Business By TheCakeMomMO Updated 15 Sep 2014 , 1:30am by leah_s

TheCakeMomMO Posted 9 Aug 2014 , 9:18pm
post #1 of 14

Please sign this petition so that people in Kentucky can start legally baking and selling their cakes from their home kitchens.  The Kentucky laws are extremely restrictive.



13 replies
-K8memphis Posted 9 Aug 2014 , 9:48pm
post #2 of 14

i live in tennessee so don't shoot me -- but they are talking about selling wine in grocery stores here but that will hurt the liquor stores -- so i'm not for it myself--


but have you seen the damage done to the existing cake businesses in other states caused by the sudden licensing of literally everyone -- pricing goes to pot, way too much supply because everybody and their brother set up shop and it's a mess --


as far as i know one can build an approved kitchen on your property in kentucky so it's not at all impossible and one would have the potential to make more money doing it that way -- keeps your market viable -- if i lived in kentucky i'd have had my own bakery 20 years ago --


and just curious if you're in missouri why are you lobbying for kentuckians?

TheCakeMomMO Posted 9 Aug 2014 , 10:02pm
post #3 of 14

Not everyone who is talented enough to make cakes may be in a situation where they can put out $10,000-20,000 to start up a bakery.  This would provide people the ability to have a separate income with a business that they could build on a smaller scale until they were able to afford to go bigger.


I am close to Kentucky and know numerous people that this would help out, some very talented at what they do.  It's a shame that legalities such as the strict restrictions in Kentucky hold people back from viable income when maybe they don't have a lot of other options. I'm honestly not sure why it matters where I live or why I care.  I'm for all states having less restrictive cottage food laws, it's ridiculous. In Missouri when my husband left me and our 3 children for another woman and cleaned out the bank account, I am very thankful that the laws allowed me to bake some cupcakes and go to our local farmers market and sell them so that I could have money to take care of my kids because I was a stay at home mother before he left.

-K8memphis Posted 9 Aug 2014 , 11:04pm
post #4 of 14

i'm sorry for what happened to you and i'm glad it sounds like you worked it out--


i just felt like there was a compelling reason for you to be lobbying for a different state--


best to you

leah_s Posted 10 Aug 2014 , 10:55am
post #5 of 14

AKy laws are really not all that restrictive. Its pretty easy to convert an extra bedroom or a garage into a kitchen. I've seen cakers do it. But the destruction done to the baking business with CFL is massive. I am not in favor.

-K8memphis Posted 10 Aug 2014 , 1:24pm
post #6 of 14

because in my area i would have to have commercially zoned property, in other words a full blown brick and mortar location other than my home i have always found the current kentucky laws to be very favorable for anyone who wanted to open up a cake business

ladyrose Posted 10 Aug 2014 , 4:44pm
post #7 of 14

Make sure the law doesn't exclude "made to order cakes." I recently went through the laws of a few different states and some say they allow cakes in one area , but then in another stated that made to order cakes, which are wedding, birthday, etc,  cakes are NOT allowed. I'm sure there are a lot of people that don't realize that even though there is a cottage law, it does not mean you can take orders for cakes.

connie9003 Posted 12 Sep 2014 , 8:22pm
post #8 of 14

For those of you that feel the Kentucky laws are not that bad you really need to do your homework. I wanted to "Convert" a room, building or my kitchen what ever to be legal in Kentucky. I called the health dept I tried all the right avenues. I even looked into purchasing or renting a space. In order to just make cakes I have to have a water filtration system, a 500 gallon grease trap, 5 sinks count them 5 sinks and that's just the tip of the ice berg. In order to make cakes in Kentucky you have to have the same codes as a full fledged commercial restaurant kitchen. As much as I love making cakes I don't want to do $50,000 a year worth of $40-$100 cakes to pay off that kind of debt. Currently I GIVE my cakes away if you don't use your talents you loose them. I tried working in a bakery. I love the owner, nice people but they don't know how to run a schedule and they pay minimum wage for standing on your feet for 12-15 hour days. It was sucking the joy out of what I do. Everyone might be able to get a license if it passes but only the good will survive. The commercial businesses have the advantage cheaper supplies business hours etc. They may feel a pinch in the beginning but in the end if their customers are happy they wont go else where. When and If I'm legal I have no intentions of under cutting the bakeries. In fact I'll probably be higher. It cost more to bake out of your home than it does in a commercial kitchen for so many reasons. Yes the "Overhead" is cheaper but your per unit cost is much higher. Even if legal I'm not posting a billboard, I would just do word of mouth. Not everyone wants to run an at home business. However it would be nice to help off set the cost of a very costly hobby.

-K8memphis Posted 12 Sep 2014 , 8:47pm
post #9 of 14

Asure there's a lot of hoops to jump through but for example in my area it just simply not allowed period -- so there's the difference--

if you are going to be certified to serve large gatherings of the public you need to have 5 sinks for safety -- you need the grease trap to save your plumbing -- it seems oversized but still it's doable -- it's not easy but it's allowed -- spend your energy getting it done for yourself the door is open

best to you! go for it!

find some plumber with 5 or 6 teenage daughters to barter with and an electrician too -- srsly -- you got this move forward with it

leah_s Posted 13 Sep 2014 , 9:20pm
post #10 of 14

5 sinks, OK yes.  A three compartment (you can buy a 3 compartment drop in) a hand sink (bar sink about $79) and a mop sink.  Mine's actually a sink in a closet that does double duty for washing artists brushes.  I don't know what county you're in but in Jefferson, you can totally convert a bedroom or a garage.  Then you'd just need a powder room to satisfy the bathroom requirement, put an automatic closer on the door hinge ($15 Home Depot) buy a covered trashcan and a sign that says Employees Must Wash hands.  You're done.  Ask for an exemption for the grease trap.  They are possible.

Jefferson also has three commercial kitchens - one rents by the hour the other two rent by the month.  .

leah_s Posted 13 Sep 2014 , 9:28pm
post #11 of 14

50 pound grease trap, fits under the sink under $400 at Webstaraunt.  Three compartment sink  average $600, same vendor.  licensed plumber to do the work, maybe $1k.  No special stoves or refrigeration needed.  

leah_s Posted 13 Sep 2014 , 9:29pm
post #12 of 14

wait - they told you a 500 gallon grease trap?  It's all based on water flow/usage.  How much water you runing thru your house?

Annabakescakes Posted 15 Sep 2014 , 1:05am
post #13 of 14

I was a divorced mother of 3 on food stamps, and in 7 years I was able to buy a house, and put a commercial kitchen in the garage, with no debt. (except a mortgage) If I can do it (in Kentucky!) anyone can. I am not for cottage food laws, since they drag down prices. I already have 100 illegal bakers undercutting me.

leah_s Posted 15 Sep 2014 , 1:30am
post #14 of 14

^ What Anna said.

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