Peach Cookies

Baking By liz at sugar Updated 8 Aug 2014 , 1:51am by bubs1stbirthday

liz at sugar Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 2:17am
post #1 of 27

ALast week I saw the post in the "what NOT to say to a baker" thread that referenced the cookies that look like peaches. I decided to make them last week for my cookie of the week! Sold out in under 3 hours each day - people were completely amazed by them! Thanks to the OP for telling us about them!

Liz

[IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3272411/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

26 replies
MBalaska Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 2:48am
post #2 of 27

Wow!  You've got to be kidding - those are cookies???

You did an amazing job on them.

johnson6ofus Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 4:12am
post #3 of 27

Wow!!!! Too cool! What recipe/ instructions please....?

bubs1stbirthday Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 4:21am
post #4 of 27

Wow - your peach biscuits look fantastic! I saw the original post on these in the other thread and thought that they did kind of look like peaches but yours really do look like peaches - Great Job on them! You have inspired me to have a go - what did you use in the centre of yours?

 

P.S if anyone is wondering the instructions can be found on page 187 of the above mentioned thread.

johnson6ofus Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 5:07am
post #5 of 27

ty

Boyka Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 8:35am
post #6 of 27

Those cookies were and still are popular in East Europe. When I was a kid my mom was doing those for my birthdays, there are many other cookies ...stuff with creams, turkish delight, nuts and etc. Those I did for Christmas...Back home the cookies are sold by kilo,there are special stores for sweets only 

 

 

 

 

Cookies stufed with nuts and rosehip jam

Dayti Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 11:28am
post #7 of 27

 

I made some too!! Except I called them apricots because they were more that size. I would use more colouring in the milk next time - I love how yours came out nice ad strong. I don't have mint so I used BC to pipe the leaves on. 

Natka81 Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 12:14pm
post #8 of 27

Good job Ladies! I see "peaches"/"apricots" at every wedding.

I haven`t made those in 4 years, they take time and my children will eat those in 30 min.

 

http://elinascookbook.wordpress.com/2012/02/08/russian-pastry-called-peach-perozhnoe-persiki/.

 

If you feel uncomfortable boiling condensed milk, mix 1 can ( 14oz.), Dulce de leche and 1/4 of (14oz.) can of condensed milk.

Now you got me hungry! need to go and make some "Peaches"!

liz at sugar Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 1:51pm
post #10 of 27

I used Olga's recipe for the cookies.  I wanted mine peach flavored, so for the filling I used cream cheese, peach preserves, sugar and the crumbs from the centers.  For my dipping liquid, I used Peach Schnapps that I boiled to get most of the alcohol out of, added a bit of heavy cream, and the food coloring.  I used Americolor Yellow, with a bit of Orange for the yellow, and then a combo of Orange and Super Red for the darker section.  I dipped mine a bit differently - I dipped almost the whole "peach" in yellow, and then the bottom (kind of angled) in the red, so the color kind of transferred up into the yellow section.  Let it dry for a minute on a sheet pan, then rolled in sugar.

 

Mine really didn't taste that peachy, but people raved over the flavor and how they looked.  Lol.

 

I will make them again around the holidays, but will probably use the dulce de leche filling, maybe flavored with some fruit extracts or liquors.

 

And before dipping, they honestly looked nothing like peaches.  Looked like two lumpy cookies stuck together.  But somehow with the color and the sugar, it does look like a peach!!

 

Thanks to Olga for the inspiration on this cookie!

 

Liz

Dayti Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 2:02pm
post #11 of 27

Yes, I used Olga's recipe too. I found I couldn't dip the cookies in sugar straight away because it just clumped, so I dipped in milk, waited a minute or so, and sprinkled it on.

 

If I make them again I would consider making them peachy flavoured too...some customers found it confusing that a cookie that looked like a peach didn't taste like one! Others thought it was a great idea to have it be a different flavour though.

Natka81 Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 2:05pm
post #12 of 27

Quote:

Originally Posted by liz at sugar 
 

I used Olga's recipe for the cookies.  I wanted mine peach flavored, so for the filling I used cream cheese, peach preserves, sugar and the crumbs from the centers.  For my dipping liquid, I used Peach Schnapps that I boiled to get most of the alcohol out of, added a bit of heavy cream, and the food coloring.  I used Americolor Yellow, with a bit of Orange for the yellow, and then a combo of Orange and Super Red for the darker section.  I dipped mine a bit differently - I dipped almost the whole "peach" in yellow, and then the bottom (kind of angled) in the red, so the color kind of transferred up into the yellow section.  Let it dry for a minute on a sheet pan, then rolled in sugar.

 

Mine really didn't taste that peachy, but people raved over the flavor and how they looked.  Lol.

 

I will make them again around the holidays, but will probably use the dulce de leche filling, maybe flavored with some fruit extracts or liquors.

 

And before dipping, they honestly looked nothing like peaches.  Looked like two lumpy cookies stuck together.  But somehow with the color and the sugar, it does look like a peach!!

 

Thanks to Olga for the inspiration on this cookie!

 

Liz

Good idea to use peach Schnapps for peach flavor.

liz at sugar Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 4:20pm
post #13 of 27

A

Original message sent by Dayti

Yes, I used Olga's recipe too. I found I couldn't dip the cookies in sugar straight away because it just clumped, so I dipped in milk, waited a minute or so, and sprinkled it on.

If I make them again I would consider making them peachy flavoured too...some customers found it confusing that a cookie that looked like a peach didn't taste like one! Others thought it was a great idea to have it be a different flavour though.

Dayti - That was why I went with Peach - thought it would be less confusing. Lol. But for the holidays I am going to do a box of assorted sugared fruits, so thought dulce de leche would be easier for those. I'll post a picture when I get my samples done.

Curious what you charged for these? I had then at 2.50 US each, and honestly could have priced them higher. People were truly fascinated!

Liz

Rfisher Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 4:39pm
post #14 of 27

APackaging idea? http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/01/peaches-panties-china_n_5642579.html But seriously, you all did a great job! Nice pictures. I wish I could be there to eat them! Balducci's used to put something like that in their gourmet food catalog many years ago....I remember wanting them then too.....

Dayti Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 4:47pm
post #15 of 27

A

Original message sent by liz at sugar

Curious what you charged for these? I had then at 2.50 US each, and honestly could have priced them higher. People were truly fascinated!

Liz

I had them at €1.50. My cupcakes are €2.50, for comparison. I think I could only charge €2.50 if I made them as big as a real peach to be honest!

liz at sugar Posted 5 Aug 2014 , 5:26pm
post #16 of 27

ARfisher, someone sent me the link to those last night.

Dayti, looks like we were in the same ballpark on pricing. Mine were probably size of small peach or very large apricot.

Liz

AnnieCahill Posted 6 Aug 2014 , 7:52pm
post #17 of 27

Pesche dolci!!!

 

I just made these back in April for a huge Italian cookie display at a wedding.  I used peach preserves, crumbs, and rum mixed together and for the filling.  These cookies are traditionally filled with pastry cream but I had to deliver and set them up first thing in the morning so I needed to use something more shelf-stable.  I also used peach brandy which I colored with red and yellow.  I didn't dip the cookies in the colored brandy because I found they got way too saturated that way and soggy, and the color was too bold.  Instead I just took a pastry brush and gently brushed the brandy on and got very light, pretty colors.  Then I rolled each one in superfine sugar and used a slivered almond for the stems.

 

My friend who owns a European bakery actually puts a whole almond in the middle of each one to resemble a pit.  I was thinking of giving it a try next time.  In the picture she showed me it looks very real.

liz at sugar Posted 6 Aug 2014 , 10:11pm
post #18 of 27

AHi Annie! Great idea about the almond! Seems like there are lots of filling differences depending on what country the recipe is from that you are using.

Liz

Natka81 Posted 6 Aug 2014 , 10:44pm
post #19 of 27

Liz at Sugar, there is no rules on filling for "peaches" as long as it looks like peaches.

imagenthatnj Posted 6 Aug 2014 , 10:48pm
post #20 of 27

Love those cookies. They're called pesche dolci. The traditional Italian version, as Annie said, is filled with pastry cream.

 

They're also dipped in an alchermes syrup and recipe is a bit different, almost like making brioche. I have Italian books where the dough is started on by sifting sugar and flour together on a mat, then making a well in the center, and adding the rest of the ingredients, and kneading.

 

The pastry cream and the alchermes syrup absorb into the cookie and make them out of this world delicious. I used to eat them when I was very young at Balducci's in New York City.

 

I figure people are now crossing them with alfajores and creating a new kind of cookie!

liz at sugar Posted 7 Aug 2014 , 12:14am
post #21 of 27

Quote:

Originally Posted by imagenthatnj 
 

Love those cookies. They're called pesche dolci. The traditional Italian version, as Annie said, is filled with pastry cream.

 

They're also dipped in an alchermes syrup and recipe is a bit different, almost like making brioche. I have Italian books where the dough is started on by sifting sugar and flour together on a mat, then making a well in the center, and adding the rest of the ingredients, and kneading.

 

The pastry cream and the alchermes syrup absorb into the cookie and make them out of this world delicious. I used to eat them when I was very young at Balducci's in New York City.

 

I figure people are now crossing them with alfajores and creating a new kind of cookie!

 

How do they store the pastry cream version before serving? Refrigerate or freeze?  And do you age them a bit like a macaron for the filling to absorb into the cookie?  Just wondered on the food safety front, because that version would be delicious.

 

Liz

imagenthatnj Posted 7 Aug 2014 , 12:42am
post #22 of 27

AAfter filling the cookies with the cream and putting an almond in the center, then dipping them in the liqueur syrup and sugar, they get put in the fridge for at least 12 hours so that they soften. They become cake-like. I know some people have made them with sponge cake. I think there's a traditional recipe in Francine Segan's book. Dolci: italy's Sweets. Maybe it's in Google Reads.

bubs1stbirthday Posted 7 Aug 2014 , 9:22am
post #23 of 27

Here is my efforts after being inspired by your 'peaches' with chocolate stem and fondant leaf. I decided to use a sugar/mango puree syrup to dip the biscuits in and I found it to be too sticky and non drying so the rolled sugar didn't work as nicely as planned unfortunately.

 

 I decided to dye the entire biscuit mix a light orange prior to baking so that I could just apply the darker orange after baking, that seemed to work really well as the sugar syrup was clear and I just dyed a little of it dark orange to do the final dipping. I did try a spray bottle but the syrup was too thick - I imagine it would work for the alcohol no problem though.

 

I will have to work on what to dip them in as my husband is a non drinker so alcohol is not an option (any suggestions would be appreciated :-) )

 

Boyka Posted 7 Aug 2014 , 9:36am
post #24 of 27

You can use any compote liquid...Do not add any coloring in your dough and you will have nice and brighter colors later...For filling you can use just butter+any jam+nuts.  

bubs1stbirthday Posted 7 Aug 2014 , 9:48am
post #25 of 27

Quote:

Originally Posted by Boyka 
 

You can use any compote liquid...Do not add any coloring in your dough and you will have nice and brighter colors later...For filling you can use just butter+any jam+nuts.  


Thankyou for your reply. I was actually really pleased with the colours that I got so would do the colouring the same next time, what I was not happy with was how the sugar 'caked on' and clumped up as the syrup was still fairly thick even after I wiped the biscuits off. Is there a trick to preventing the sugar from clumping and just giving a fine dusting if you use a sugar/fruit syrup? Thanks again.

liz at sugar Posted 8 Aug 2014 , 1:15am
post #26 of 27

Quote:

Originally Posted by bubs1stbirthday 
 


Thankyou for your reply. I was actually really pleased with the colours that I got so would do the colouring the same next time, what I was not happy with was how the sugar 'caked on' and clumped up as the syrup was still fairly thick even after I wiped the biscuits off. Is there a trick to preventing the sugar from clumping and just giving a fine dusting if you use a sugar/fruit syrup? Thanks again.


Some of the recipes just used colored milk to dip in, so I don't think you are tied to using alcohol. :)

 

Good idea on coloring the dough!  That would make the inside look more peach like!

 

Liz

bubs1stbirthday Posted 8 Aug 2014 , 1:51am
post #27 of 27

Quote:

Originally Posted by liz at sugar 
 


Some of the recipes just used colored milk to dip in, so I don't think you are tied to using alcohol. :)

 

Good idea on coloring the dough!  That would make the inside look more peach like!

 

Liz


Thankyou - will look into the milk suggestion :-) Yes they did look more peach like on the inside when you bite into them, haha kind of weird to eat because as you bite into it they are peachy enough looking to confuse your brain even though you of course know what they are. 

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