Yet Another Delivery Disaster - Please Help

Decorating By torysgirl87 Updated 28 Jul 2014 , 4:22pm by costumeczar

torysgirl87 Posted 22 Jul 2014 , 11:09pm
post #1 of 53

A

I delivered this cake today and upon arrival the rosettes from the top tier were completely off.  You could see the red velvet cake underneath.  The bottom layer of rosettes were smashed.  The top layer were intact on top of them.  On the second tier, the second layer of rosettes was smashed in the back w/ about three of the rosettes on the top layer falling off.  The bottom tier was intact.

 

I have no idea why this happened.  The cake was leveled w/ an Agbay.  Internal structure was pillars & plates.  It was sound.  No cream cheese on the red velvet.  I made white chocolate buttercream: 1 cup crisco, 3 oz candy melts, 3 tbsp water, 2 lbs powdered sugar, 1 tbsp meringue powder.

 

I am to get my cottage food license and start selling cakes by the first of the year.  In 60 days I will have the grease trap installed at home to meet the licensing requirements.  Please help me understand why this happened.  I am losing my confidence to do this and do it correctly.  This was a donation for a volunteer event.  If was actually for a wedding, I'd be more than embarrassed.  I want to do cakes and do them legitimately but I'm failing.

 

Thanks in advance.

Edit: I was able to make some repairs to the cake. The recipients were pleased, but this was just not acceptable for me. Also, the car ride was extremely bumpy.

52 replies
-K8memphis Posted 22 Jul 2014 , 11:26pm
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i don't know how you delivered but i deliver climate controlled--

 

1st of all my cakes are nice & cold so i have that invisible internal cohesion that the cold fats provide--the importance can't be over stated--

 

then i deliver cakes boxed --early in my career i did not box -- then i grew up and 8O anxiety :-? set in so the one time i was gonna deliver in recent years without a box like within an hour of delivery it came a sudden huge gulley washer and the humidity poured off the roofs and surfaces like a sauna -- so i whipped out a box real quick --

 

and a cold cake in a corrugated cardboard box can withstand the heat/humidity and it helps with the bumps--i've day dreamed about designing a gyroscope kind of delivery stand that will keep the cake level no matter what --

 

i know where you're coming from -- you can do this -- climate controlled -- and some padding under there -- was it in a box -- did the sun get it?

 

really sorry that happened and what a perfect way to have it happen -- you dodged the bullet so rejoice about that! you got this -- the cake angels were shining mercy down on you--just build a better mousetrap

cakegrandma Posted 22 Jul 2014 , 11:31pm
post #3 of 53

According to what you printed as your recipe I believe that your icing may have been too stiff to hold onto the sides of the cake. Next time try thinning it some and they should stay put.  Also like K8memphis states, use the box to deliver.

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 12:29am
post #4 of 53

AI did use a box, not a cold cake though. Cottage food law requires no refrigeration so I've never gone that route. There was a/c the entire way.

I did not find the icing stiff at all. The candy melts were smooth and so was the icing. I crumb coated with it, came back and iced thin and then added the rosettes. Not only the rosettes came off, though, the icing underneath did also. The cake was showing. It looked almost wet.

Could it have been too much icing?

Thank you both for your replies.

pieceofcaketx Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 12:54am
post #5 of 53

When the CFL states no refrigeration it usually means you can't use perishable fillings etc. that REQUIRE refrigeration, not that you can't refrigerate your cakes at all. I bake under a CFL and I chill all my cakes prior to delivery for stability purposes not because they need to be kept cold to prevent spoiling.

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 1:04am
post #6 of 53

Athe box shielded your cake from the ac

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 1:43am
post #7 of 53

AI understand the law, but you aren't allowed to mix your clients cakes with your personal groceries. You must designate a shelf for client ingredients only and an additional appliance is not allowed. So there really isn't room to do this. I do have a deep freezer Is condensation not a problem?

You also agree that heat was the problem?

Thanks, pieceofcaketx

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 1:47am
post #8 of 53

AOk, so you think if its not refrigerated it shouldn't be boxed? The bottom tier wasn't effected at all. There were hand holes cut in the top of the box for me to carry it, but the top of the box was closed.

What kind of padding do you mean? I put the box on a towel and anti slip mats.

Thank you, k8memphis.

cakesbycathy Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 1:49am
post #9 of 53

Quote:

Originally Posted by pieceofcaketx 
 

When the CFL states no refrigeration it usually means you can't use perishable fillings etc. that REQUIRE refrigeration, not that you can't refrigerate your cakes at all. I bake under a CFL and I chill all my cakes prior to delivery for stability purposes not because they need to be kept cold to prevent spoiling.

 

This!

Norasmom Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 2:16am
post #10 of 53

sounds like the rosettes were too heavy for the cake recipe.  Was the cake firm or moist?   This has happened to me too.  Definitely refrigerate, if possible…

I had a tall cake so during the baking process I emptied my fridge for the cake…my groceries went to my mom's fridge.  It's not easy….

FrostedMoon Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 2:29am
post #11 of 53

What was the cake filled with?  Did you give time for the cake layers to settle?  I'm thinking it might have been a combination of a very moist cake (possibly a filling that leaked?) and air bubbles that built up under the frosting and the rosettes just pulled the bubble right off the side of the moist cake.   This might have been even more likely if the rosettes were heavy/stiff.

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 2:48am
post #12 of 53

I'm looking for a cause so that I can find a solution.  You think it was the heat?  Perhaps you care to contribute to why you think this happened or offer something regarding my question on condensation.  You can also see my post regarding the rules for use of your home refrigerator in my state.  Thanks.

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 2:48am
post #13 of 53

I'm looking for a cause so that I can find a solution.  You think it was the heat?  Perhaps you care to contribute to why you think this happened or offer something regarding my question on condensation.  You can also see my post regarding the rules for use of your home refrigerator in my state.  Thanks.

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 2:49am
post #14 of 53

Quote:

Originally Posted by cakesbycathy 
 

 

This!

I'm looking for a cause so that I can find a solution.  You think it was the heat?  Perhaps you care to contribute to why you think this happened or offer something regarding my question on condensation.  You can also see my post regarding the rules for use of your home refrigerator in my state.  Thanks.

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 2:56am
post #15 of 53

Noras mom & Frosted Moon,

 

The cake was moist.  But I didn't think overly so.  It was a mix w/ added egg and pudding.  I froze them for a few days and let them thaw for a few hours at room temp.  I filled w/ the same buttercream, crumb coated them and let them set for a few hours before adding a thin layer of icing then the rosettes.

 

I will have another inspection w/ the state, but I don't think that refrigeration of the cakes is really allowed, even if you take your groceries out.  The space isn't to be shared at all.  On designated shelf for clients only.  If you have a need for more space, the state says you need a commercial space.  I can use my deep freezer (I can live w/o putting personal groceries in it), which I do already, but I could at best use it to chill at the largest size a 14 inch cake on a 16 inch board.

 

I think the roses perhaps were too heavy, stiff next to the moist cake.  But I don't think there was air.  There was hours of settling time between each step.  And the cake wasn't moved until 14 hours after I completed it.

oftheeicing Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 3:09am
post #16 of 53

AI am going to venture to guess, that the ratio of white chocolate to your other ingredients was the culprit. Regardless of a/c in a closed up vehicle, if you have the slightest bit of humidity, the chocolate will melt.

reginaherrin Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 3:16am
post #17 of 53

I also think it is the heat as well, combined with a bit stiffer icing.  Also, I did a bit of quick research about CFLs in your state and I did not find anything not allowing additional refrigerators.  It does say you cannot have commercial equipment but nothing about having 2 regular refrigerators.  I operate under a CFL and have a separate refrigerator that I store my cakes in not because they need it but because it makes it so much safer and easier to deliver. Sorry this happened but at least it wasn't for a wedding and has now become a learning lesson.

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 3:18am
post #18 of 53

AThank you. What should the ratio be?

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 3:25am
post #19 of 53

AYou're right, you won't see it upon research. I have two stoves, the current one and a new double range, and I was shopping a fridge. But the head at the Dept of Agriculture told me I run the risk of not having my app approved b/c it would look like an attempt to run a commercial amount of products from a home kitchen. He said essentially it would not be a home kitchen w/ the added appliances. The rules don't read that way, but I want the license so I'm going by what he said. I won't know for sure until the grease trap is installed.

Any recommendations on changing the icing? Red velvet is not a cake I plan to sell at all, I hate to work with it, but I have another cake to deliver for this volunteer event, which is why I'm spastic at this point, but just trying to fix it.

Thanks for your post.

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 3:32am
post #20 of 53

Ahttp://www.wilton.com/recipe/print/Chocolate-Buttercream-Icing

This is the recipe I used as a guide for the icing

reginaherrin Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 5:17am
post #21 of 53

I definitely get not wanting to rock the boat but it sure doesn't make sense to me.  You already have 2 stoves which they say is fine but won't let you have 2 refrigerators?  Even though there is nothing in the rules against it? And to me, having to put a grease trap in sounds more of a "commercial kitchen".  My parents have had 2 refrigerators in their house since I was a teenager and they certainly don't have any home based business and I actually know a lot of people that have 2 refrigerators, so it is not uncommon for a regular home more then one.

 

As someone else said earlier, there is not enough liquid in the recipe compared to the candy melts and powdered sugar.  I would add a few more tablespoons of water and a teaspoon or 2 of vanilla. 

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 9:51am
post #22 of 53

AI'm not licensed yet and not selling cakes; I'm only using one stove. The other one would need wiring for an additional outlet. I haven't had the final inspection yet so I didn't actually tell the man I had two. I got another one b/c it was such good deal. The way the law is written I thought I HAD to have another fridge. When I contacted him for clarification I got the info above. The grease trap is a county requirement based on a federal law. I tried to get an exemption but no deal. I received special permission to have it placed just outside of the kitchen in the yard. The state doesn't require it. I know lots of people with several appliance too. I'll have to ask again.

Thanks for the suggestion.

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 9:55am
post #23 of 53

AI realize I misstated the amount if sugar in the original post. I only used one lb. I followed the Wilton recipe except I used all shortening, water not milk and added meringue. Candy melts instead of white chocolate. I've made it before with actual milk chocolate. I actually forgot to use vanilla.

Any thoughts on using the freezer for chilling?

Thanks.

AAtKT Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 9:58am
post #24 of 53

I agree about the two fridges deal... My parents have two regular refrigerators and a stand up freezer... neither of them has any type of food business... Thank goodness they have a generator for when the power goes out so that they don't loose all that frozen stuff... lol...

 

Though, I can see the whole two stove thing...

 

Which federal law requires a grease trap?  I only ask, because the CFL in Ohio doesn't require that (nor the separation of your groceries vs their groceries thing ~ that's a whole other issue)...

FrostedMoon Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 11:07am
post #25 of 53

There is so much variation between one inspector to another.  I have caking friends who live in the two towns next to me and we each have had very different inspections and very different requirements, sometimes even from one inspection to the next!

 

I think using a freezer for a quick (15 min chill) is okay, but much longer and you run a much higher risk of condensation being an issue.  Unless you can freeze, then defrost for a while in a fridge, condensation is an issue.  I too live in a state where I can't sell items that need to be refrigerated, but they can be chilled in a fridge (or shelf) that is designated for business only.  Condensation is still an issue and makes me nervous, but much less so right out of the fridge.  

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 11:42am
post #26 of 53

AI can't point you in the direction at the moment, but I'll look up the info I was given. It has to do with the high population in the metro Atlanta counties, which is why its not a state requirement, but a county one based on a federal environmental safety law.

I'm going to check into another fridge again.

Thanks.

vldutoit Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 12:14pm
post #27 of 53

I think it was the candy melts that were the culprit.  There is a difference between candy melts and white chocolate.  There is a certain amount of wax product in the candy melts.  If you crumb coated the cake in it and then attached the rosettes to it, the heat would have played a part in them sliding off.  The rosette wasn't able to grab onto the frosting due to the wax, if that makes sense.

torysgirl87 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 12:24pm
post #28 of 53

AI think candy melts were problematic too. I like the flavor of them over the white chocolate though. Doesn't matter, I won't do this again! But the rosettes seemed to literally pull all the icing off the cake. The rosettes and icing underneath were off the cake. If not pulled off, they were crushed underneath the row of rosettes above.

cai0311 Posted 24 Jul 2014 , 2:33pm
post #29 of 53

AIf the icing was too stiff there is a chance the rosettes could fall off. Was there a crumb coat on the cake before you iced the rosettes? The crumb coat helps give the rosette icing something to cling too.

I operate from a licensed home in Ohio. I have 2 refrigerators. The main one in my kitchen and 1 in my basement. The one in the basement is just for cakes. But I had it before I started making cakes. I know a lot of people that have 2 refrigerators. My partents have 1 fridge, 1 freezer chest and 1 up right freezer. All for personal use.

I think you need to double check the rules with what is in writing. The person you spoke with may not understand the rules correctly.

Also, I agree with the other posts that all cakes should be chilled before delivery. This helps firm up the cake and icing which means it is less likely to damage in transit.

MimiFix Posted 24 Jul 2014 , 3:26pm
post #30 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by cai0311 

I operate from a licensed home in Ohio. I have 2 refrigerators. The main one in my kitchen and 1 in my basement. The one in the basement is just for cakes... I think you need to double check the rules... 

 

With NY's CFL, paper goods still in original packaging may be stored anywhere, such as the basement or attic. But all appliances must be in the kitchen/dining room area. This prevents transporting food from the approved (clean area with a permit/license) into another part of the house that has potential for contamination. 

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