What Would You Charge For This?

Decorating By Buttercup1321 Updated 24 Jul 2014 , 4:46pm by cai0311

Buttercup1321 Posted 14 Jul 2014 , 3:19am
post #1 of 29

First of all, hello everyone! This is my first post to this forum - probably my first of many, actually. I've always baked, since I was a child (I'm late 20's now), but it's always been cookies or simple cakes - real simple, like no fondant, no decorations, just cake and frosting. :)

 

I have now ventured into the world of fondant cakes, and I've made 2 so far. My first fondant cake was 3 tiers and pretty big, but simple decorations. I want to post pictures to get input on that one later.

 

But for now, I would like input on this cake that I made yesterday. This was my 2nd cake, and it was a stacked 6" cake. It was for my co-worker for her son's first year pictures they were doing. It was a devil's food cake with chocolate buttercream and chocolate ganache with fresh strawberries in between the layers. It was frosted with the chocolate buttercream, and then the white fondant and other fondant decorations, as you can see. 

 

It took me about 6.5 hours to make - including the time to bake and cool the cake. It took a good 4 hours in decorations, and I'm still trying to figure out exactly what took all that time! Anyway, she paid me for it but my boyfriend thinks I severely underpriced the cake, based on how long it took me. I know my fondant is not perfect. Before I tell people what she paid, I want to see what you would charge or expect people to pay for this cake. 

 

If you have any helpful tips regarding anything cake related, they're greatly appreciated! I've looked up a lot on this message board - and have a lot more to look up. Thanks in advance! :)

 

28 replies
inkyonne Posted 17 Jul 2014 , 5:02am
post #2 of 29

I am a hobby baker and don't charge for my cakes. But I would guess $20-$25. Just for your supplies.

How much did you charge?

morganchampagne Posted 17 Jul 2014 , 6:10am
post #3 of 29

AThe first suggestion I have is, to prevent those Bulges you should fill your cakes and let them settle at room temperature for at least 6 hours.

Second, did you use some kind of texture mat on the fondant? If not that's from it being a bit too dry. What kind of fondant did you use?

morganchampagne Posted 17 Jul 2014 , 6:12am
post #4 of 29

AAs far as what's to be charged, it's hard to say because everywhere is different. I'd recommend doing a search on here for "how to price my cakes" and you can read about it. The way I do it is: materials+ time+ profit=total price. With regards to market value. You can read more about considering market value when pricing cakes. Overall though I very much like the design.

FioreCakes Posted 17 Jul 2014 , 11:34pm
post #5 of 29

I hate to be the bad guy here, but I don't think you are at a skill level to charge yet. I can see several areas of improvement. I think when people are deciding what to charge it is because they are competitive with their local bakeries and I think you could be someday, but right now you should focus on practicing. I am sure the cake tastes great, but most people are paying for custom cakes for their appearance. 

cakegrandma Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 12:08am
post #6 of 29

The design idea on your cake is very cute, however, I feel that there are many errors on it.  One has already been mentioned, the bulge and it is very important to let your cake sit as stated so it can settle.  The other things I noticed are; the circles on the top of the cake are not really even as far as the diameter is concerned.  The balls at the bottom are not uniform.  The easies way to make them all the same size is to roll out fondant and cut circles that will be large enough so that when you roll it into a ball it is not only neat but all will be consistent.  Also the number is not too neat and what I would have done is print a number on your computer and cut it from gum paste.  Sorry, but this is what I see. 

pastrypet Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 12:09am
post #7 of 29

I agree with FioreCakes. The design is cute, but the sides are bulging, the fondant isn't smooth, and the balls at the bottom aren't round. Therefore, I suggest you practice a lot more before selling cakes.

oftheeicing Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 4:20am
post #8 of 29

APersonally, I never sold a cake prior to becoming licensed by my home state. But, on that note.... we all have to start somewhere, and we all have been there. I know quite a few licensed home bakers in my area that sell cakes that I think are absolutely horrendous, and they have a pretty decent customer base. Yours may not be perfect, but what truly is? You are learning and taking the time to learn more as you go, which is admirable. You will learn that we are our own worst critic. The lines, fondant balls, number is something that will be perfected with time. The bulges are easily prevented and learned from experience, classes, online tutorials or advice from others. When doing a fondant covered cake, I use a stiff dam around the edges of my layers even if I am only filling with buttercream and let the cake settle with just a crumb coat and a cardboard with a weight on top (usually overnight). As far as time is concerned, with each cake, you will get faster. I do not count baking or cooling time as far as charging goes (unless I am whipping up a batch of buttercream, or making fondant at the same time, etc.). My cost for a 2 layer, 6" fondant chocolate cake is as follows: chocolate cake - $3.71, ganache: 4.98, fondant - 4.21, boards (I use 2 for double layer cakes) - $.94, box -$1.50, gumpaste (for the number) - $2.00, bamboo skewer - $.05, parchment paper - $.50, foil for my board - $.75, tape - $.25, then add in electricity, dish soap, water, etc. (I usually add $5.00 for overhead for cakes this size). Having done many cakes, I would say that this would take me 2.5 hours to complete. I charge $20 per hour so, total cost give or take would be about $75 with everything included. As a hobby baker, I would charge about $25... just enough to cover my supplies amd overhead.

Smckinney07 Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 7:07am
post #9 of 29

AYes, we all need to start somewhere, but until you have the basics down (at the very least covering a cake smoothly with fondant) then I would simply donate these cakes.

I mean no offense to Buttercup or any disrespect I just don't think it's fair to practice on a paying customer.

Norasmom Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 12:30pm
post #10 of 29

Since this is a friend, there is no harm in charging for ingredients…although technically this is illegal unless you have a licensed kitchen.  If a I were to purchase or sell that cake with a friend, my ingredients would be about $35.00.  I wouldn't charge for my time because I would consider it educational time.  Learning is an investment.

 

Keep practicing and read this forum regularly, you will learn so much!  Don't feel badly or get discouraged when people tell you your cake should not be sold, it is not perfect but in time you will improve and people on this sight are very helpful.  My cakes are far from perfect but I do have customers.  I have kept my business small and referral-only, no weddings.  I don't practice enough…:-D

fondantslinger Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 2:44pm
post #11 of 29

BUTTERCUP,

 

I'M PRETTY STRAIGHT FORWARD SO HERE GOES...I HAVE BEEN DOING CAKES FOR CLOSE TO 30 YRS, LESSON #1.....IF YOU ARE GOING TO CONTINUE MAKING CAKES (& I HOPE YOU DO) CHECKOUT YOUR AREA BAKERIES & OTHER DECORATOR'S TO SEE WHAT THEY ARE CHARGING......THIS IS YOUR PRICING POINT.....GET YOURSELF 3 STYROFOAM DUMMIES (6", 8" & 10") & PRACTICE IN YOUR SPARE TIME, COVERING THEM, DECORATING THEM, TEAR IT DOWN WIPE THEM CLEAN & START OVER EACH TIME DOING IT A LITTLE SLOWER, MORE CAREFULLY, PAYING ATTENTION TO DETAIL & MOST IMPORTANTLY TO OVERALL STRUCTURE. THERE ARE A TON OF BOOKS & DVD OUT THERE IF YOU CAN AFFORD THEM & PRACTICE THE TECHNIQUES......HEY, LIKE I SAID I HAVE BEEN DOING THIS FOR CLOSE TO 30 YRS NOW & I AM STILL LEARNING DIFFERENT WAYS & IF ANYONE ELSE TELLS YOU THAT THEY AREN'T STILL LEARNING STAY AWAY FROM THEM......MAKING CAKE: .AFTER GREASING & FLOURING PANS LAY IN A PIECE OF PARCHMENT & LIGHTLY GREASE THAT ALSO, POUR IN BATTER & BAKE, COOL DOWN...KNEEL DOWN (UNLESS CAKE IS ON A HIGH STAND) & EYEBALL THE TOP OF EACH CAKE LOOKING TO SEE IF LEVEL........(IF YOU CAN BUY A LEVELER - WORTH THE MONEY FOR ANYONE.......SET THE LEVELER & RUN YOUR CAKE THRU IT CLOSE TO THE END OF THE SPRING PART OF TENSION WIRE & SPIN THE CAKE THRU AS YOU ARE DOING THIS BUT MAKE SURE THAT LEVELER IS FIRMLY PLANTED ON YOUR SURFACE & YOU DO NOT TILT IT "EVER" WHILE PUSHING CAKE THRU......DO THIS FOR EVERY TIER IF DOING MORE THAN ONE SO THAT EVERYONE IS EQUALLY LEVEL (YOUR LEVEL WILL ALLOW YOU TO SET HOW DEEP YOU WILL BE CUTTING OFF FROM THE TOPS......BEND DOWN & EYEBALL AGAIN TO MAKE SURE ALL IS LEVEL & BUY A SMALL CARPENTER'S LEVEL AT HARDWARE STORE & SIT IT ON TOP OF CAKE TO SEE IF BUBBLE IN LEVEL IS DEAD CENTER THEN YOU KNOW YOUR GOOD TO GO......IF THIS IS MORE THAN 1 TIER PLACE DOWELS NOW FOR WEIGHT STRUCTURE-TAKE THE 2ND TIERS' CAKEBOARD & LAY IT ON TOP OF CAKE & PRESS GENTLY TO IMPRINT A CIRCLE THIS IS YOUR GUIDE FOR PLACING DOWELS WHERE TIER #2 WILL BE SITTING ON, DO THIS FOR EVERY TIER.....NEXT PIPE WITH A #12 TIP (A GOOD SIZE TO USE) WHAT IS CALLED A 'DAM' -A CIRCLE - ON THE TOP OF THE CAKE ABOUT 1/2 INCH IN FROM EDGE& OVERLAP THE END WHERE IT MEETS STARTING POINT......FILL THE MIDDLE  WITH YOUR FILLING BUT NOT OVER IT, KEEP IT INSIDE THE DAM........DO EACH TIER.....TAKE ROYAL ICING (CAN BUY BUCKETS OF THIS STUFF) CRUMB COAT THE CAKE..I DO THE TOP FIRST & LET IT OVERHANG A BIT & TAKE AN OFFSET SPATULA & LIGHTLY TOUCH THE OUTER EDGE & DRAG IT ACROSS THE TOP TO SMOOTH, GO ALL THE WAY AROUND & IT'S OK IF THERE'S SOME HANGING OVER STILL...THEN.I START AT THE BOTTOM & I PILE THE STUFF ON THIS WAY WHEN I GET TO THE GAP OF WHERE YOU CAN SEE THE DAM & CAKE THERE IS AN OPENING BETWEEN LAYERS...WELL PILING ON THE ICING WILL FILL IN THOSE GAPS...WORK THE ICING AROUND THE SIDES WITH YOUR OFFSET SPATULA A ROW AT A TIME & PILE IT ON.....THERE WILL BE ALOT OF ICING DON'T FRET......GET YOURSELF A SPACKLING SCRAPER AT THE HARDWARE STORE - A LARGE BLADED ONE...SET THIS SPACKLER TOOL ON CAKE BOARD LEVEL 90 DEGREES SLIGHTLY AGAINST YOUR CAKE.......NOW TURN YOUR CAKE WITH ONE HAND & SCRAPE OFF EXCESS ICING WITH TOOL...EYEBALL CAKE BY TURNING IT & MAKING SURE IT LOOKS EVEN ALL THE WAY AROUND...THEN GO BACK, IF YOU NEED TO ADD MORE ICING IN A SPOT DO IT & SCRAPE OFF AGAIN  WHEN ALL IS OK - LEVEL OFF TOP....REFRIG CAKE & WHEN ICING HAS A CRUST TO IT, DO IT ALL OVER AGAIN ONE MORE  TIME......REFRIG....DECORATE & CAKE IS GOOD TO GO......IF GOING WITH FONDANT COVER.....DO NOT STACK YOUR CAKES TIL ALL ARE COVERED IN FONDANT...TO DO,  KNEAD YOUR FONDANT, I USE RENSHAW PRODUCTS, FONDX & FONDARIFIC......DO NOT USE A TON OF POWDER SUGAR OR CORNSTARCH, THIS WILL DRY & CRACK YOUR FONDANT IF TOO MUCH IS USED.......FONDANT SHOULD HAVE A SMOOTH, SATIN LOOK TO IT.......SIZE YOUR CAKES TO KNOW HOW MUCH FONDANT TO USE (MEASURE UP ONE SIDE & TIMES THAT BY 2, THEN MEASURE ACROSS TOP & ADD THE NUMBERS TOGETHER THEN ADD 2-3 MORE INCHES FOR GOOD MEASURE........THIS NUMBER LETS YOU KNOW HOW BIG A PIECE OF FONDANT TO ROLL OUT (EX: 6IN CAKE BY 4 IN HIGH = 14 IN...ROLL OUT A 16-17INCH PC OF FONDANT)...ONCE ROLLED PLACE ROLLING PIN AT ONE END OF ROLLED FONDANT & DRAPE EDGE OF FONDANT OVER IT & LIGHTLY ROLL YOUR FONDANT OVER THE ROLLING PIN, PICK UP THE PIN & START AT ONE SIDE OF BOTTOM OF CAKE & LIGHTLY MOVE ROLLING PIN UP & OVER THE TOP & DOWN THE OTHER SIDE OF CAKE.....YOU WILL HAVE EXCESS, THAT'S A GOOD THING.....USE A SMOOTHER TOOL & LIGHTLY SMOOTH OVER TOP...TAKE YOUR 1 HAND & FROM TOP EDGE "LIGHTLY" SMOOTH DOWN ABOUT 2 INCHES ALL THE WAY AROUND WHILE YOUR OTHER HAND IS GENTLY PULLING THE FONDANT TO FAN IT OUT SO AS NOT TO CAUSE WRINKLES WHEN SMOOTHING DOWN...DO THIS VERY GENTLY ALL THE WAY AROUND WHILE PULLING OUT THE FONDANT AS YOU GO AT THE BOTTOM, GO 2 INCHES AT A TIME ALL THE WAY AROUND....GO GENTLY OTHERWISE YOU ARE "PULLING & STRETCHING" THE FONDANT AWAY FROM THE TOP & IT WILL TEAR THEN YOU HAVE TO START ALL OVER......ONCE YOU GET THE HANG OF SMOOTHING FONDANT DOWN THE SIDES USE A PIZZA CUTTER & CUT OFF EXCESS....SMOOTH SIDES AGAIN...TAKE OFFSET SPATULA & GENTLY TUCK IN BOTTOMS...DO EACH TIER THIS WAY......YOU CAN TAKE CAKEBOARD & MAKE IMPRINT NOW TO INSERT DOWELS FOR NEXT TIER TO REST ON...IF TRANSPORTING THIS CAKE A DISTANCE THEN TAKE A LARGER DOWEL, SHARPEN ONE END TO A POINT & PUSH IT IN THE TOP CENTER OF CAKE ALL THE WAY THRU TO THE BOTTOM TIER DEAD CENTER.......PRACTICE YOUR DECORATIONS, OR USE GUMBALLS, OR PEARLS IN DIFFERENT SIZES, OR ROCK CANDY, RIBBON, OR EDIBLE LACES FOR BORDERS UNTIL YOU GET COMFORTABLE STRUCTURING YOUR OWN & EVEN THEN YOU DON'T HAVE TO WITH ALL THE STUFF THAT'S OUT THERE NOW.  BUT DON'T GIVE UP ON CAKE IF YOU ENJOY DOING THIS.

 

YOUR CAKE WAS A GOOD ATTEMPT FOR A FIRST TIME OUT THERE........I WOULD HAVE CHARGED ABOUT $20-25 FOR SUPPLIES & MY TIME........WATCH YOUR TIME THO......YOU CAN'T CHARGE 50 HOURS SAY FOR A CAKE THAT ACTUALLY SHOULD HAVE TAKEN 20.......& YOU CAN CHARGE FOR YOUR SERVICES.....SOME STATES HAVE COTTAGE LAWS  NOW WITH NO LICENSES NEEDED.......BUT YOU DON'T HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT THAT IF YOU ARE JUST STARTING & ONLY GET A CUSTOMER HERE & THERE.......WHEN CUSTOMERS & MONEY COME PILING IN THEN YOU NEED TO GET SERIOUSLY LEGAL..........GOOD LUCK TO YOU, DON'T GIVE UP, TAKE CRITICISM LIGHTLY ITS YOUR LEARNING EXPERIENCE....I STILL GET SOME & SOME NOT ALWAYS GOOD BUT IT DOESN'T STOP ME FOR ALL THOSE WHO KEEP WANTING MORE & THERE'S ALWAYS PEOPLE YOU WILL NEVER SATISFY & THAT MY DEAR SOMETIMES INCLUDES FAMILY!  POINT IS - IF YOU ENJOY WHAT YOUR  DOING, BE IT MAKING CAKES, DRAWING A PICTURE, OR GARDENING, YOU KEEP ON DOING IT, YOU MAKE YOURSELF HAPPY THE REST WILL FOLLOW.  LET US KNOW IF YOU GGET ANOTHER ADVENTURE OR JUST FEEL LIKE SHOWING US ONE OF YOUR PRACTICE RUNS, LOVE TO SEE IT.

cakegrandma Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 5:47pm
post #12 of 29

fondantslinger, I mean no offense but, please don't type in all capitals. The main reason being; it is very difficult to read, especially long replies. 2nd - in the world of the internet, it is considered yelling.  Again, please no offense.

MimiFix Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 5:52pm
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakegrandma 
 

fondantslinger, I mean no offense but, please don't type in all capitals. The main reason being; it is very difficult to read, especially long replies. 2nd - in the world of the internet, it is considered yelling.  Again, please no offense.

 

Yes, thank you cakegrandma for responding about this. I really wanted to read that post but found it impossible - so I just moved on...

cakegrandma Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 6:09pm
post #14 of 29

It was my pleasure. When I worked I typed some things in all Caps and I was told by my boss, she did proofing etc. for a large publishing company, not to do it.  She said people can not read it, WHAT, can't read it? I can but after so many years of following that so many others can't and that it is not an option unless I want to yell.  I hope I offended no one.

pastrypet Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 6:28pm
post #15 of 29

I copied it and pasted into Word. Then changed it to sentence case. I broke it into several shorter paragraphs so it was a little easier to read.

MimiFix Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 7:28pm
post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by pastrypet 
 

I copied it and pasted into Word. Then changed it to sentence case. I broke it into several shorter paragraphs so it was a little easier to read.

 

You have way more energy than I do. (Just reading about a friend's upcoming vacation is enough to get me tired.)  

MBalaska Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 8:07pm
post #17 of 29

Quote:

Originally Posted by Buttercup1321 

"......... Before I tell people what she paid, I want to see what you would charge or expect people to pay for this cake..............."

 

As you are already selling cakes like these, and people are happy to give you their hard earned cash, good for you.   Whatever works in your area.

fondantslinger Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 8:50pm
post #18 of 29

Quote:

Originally Posted by cakegrandma 
 

fondantslinger, I mean no offense but, please don't type in all capitals. The main reason being; it is very difficult to read, especially long replies. 2nd - in the world of the internet, it is considered yelling.  Again, please no offense.


no offense taken.............when you get where I am in life you can do as you darn well please.....trust me if I was yelling, you'd hear me

Bunny0410 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 6:24am
post #19 of 29

So?????

What price was charged for the cake?

DeniseNH Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 11:30am
post #20 of 29

All great advice and I too couldn't get through more than two sentences of the all caps comment.  All caps (to me) means you're screaming at the receiver.  Too bad because your advice was very valuable.  I love the design and the One on top.  The circles under it needed to be cut out of a circle cutter for uniformity.  Your fondant was overworked with powdered sugar so it cracked and left elephant skin, the cakes inside were overfilled and before you put the crumb coat on you can press firmly down on the top of the cake then remove any excess icing that came out.  The large balls at the base were colorful and fit the theme perfectly but next time try this.  Roll out the fondant then take an icing tip - turn it over to the fat side and press down into the fondant - you'll end up with uniform circles you can then roll and will end up with the same sized balls.  They looked a little lumpy so keep practicing your technique until you can get them perfectly round.  The stripes were perfectly placed - equal distances from each other so you have that nailed but they 're a little wide for a cake that size.  You probably used a ruler as your guide.  I would then cut them in half with a pizza cutter to make them a half inch wide but put twice as many on the cake.  Also, I can see you placed it on a raw, uncovered cardboard plate that was really close to the actual size of the cake.  If you glued two or three (a bit larger) on top of each other, covered in colored foil (glued down with school glue) then placed a ribbon along the edge of the board in a contrasting color - and followed the advice above - you could easily sell the amended cake for $30.

Buttercup1321 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 4:04pm
post #21 of 29

AThanks again for all of the advice. I keep submitting responses but they are all being held for moderation and none of them have been posted yet. This is really frustrating.

Denise - you nailed everything! It was a ruler, there was too much powdered sugar. I'm making another cake in the next couple of days and I bought the Satin Ice/Sunny Side Up fondant so I'm going to try and practice what I've learned here on this cake.

Thanks again and hopefully all of my responses will appear soon!

Buttercup1321 Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 4:14pm
post #22 of 29

AOkay, so that response appeared immediately, and the others still haven't. I don't remember what all I said in my other posts, but I just want everyone to know I really, really appreciate all of the tips and the advice!! It's invaluable.

As for price, I had told her $50 for this cake. She felt like I was being nice and going too low (no joke) since I work with/know her, so she paid me $80. I'm a bit embarrassed to admit that on here because I now see that was WAY overpriced. I had already agreed to make her a cake this weekend, so I'm still doing that and I'm not charging her. It's a 3 tier stacked cake, very simple design - light blue fondant and white clouds. I'm hoping with my new fondant knowledge that my fondant will come out better.

I'm trying to figure out how much I can do in advance, and I found another thread on this board that I think will help with that. This board is such a wonderful resource!

I will post pictures of this next cake over the weekend or next week...if it comes out better than my last!

Oh, and I believe someone asked what fondant I used on this cake - it was the prepackaged Cake Boss fondant. It may not have been the fondants fault as I think I used way too much powdered sugar. That's what made the fondant look all textured.

Thanks again!!

DeniseNH Posted 23 Jul 2014 , 4:45pm
post #23 of 29

All the best with the new and improved version.  Can't wait to see it.  We're here for you!!!

DeniseNH Posted 24 Jul 2014 , 1:32am
post #24 of 29

I forgot one other tip.  While cutting your stripes.....  Lay a length of waxed paper out on your kitchen counter.  Grease it ever so lightly.  Roll out your paste on the waxed paper and cut it into the half inch wide strips 0 remove excess paste then pick up the waxed paper and place onto a metal cookie sheet.  Place cookie sheet, waxed paper and fondant strips into your freezer for 10 minutes.  When ready to put the strips on the cake, take them out of the freezer one at a time and put into place.  They won't distort or wabble on you.  Total precision.

mattyeatscakes Posted 24 Jul 2014 , 3:21am
post #25 of 29

A

Original message sent by DeniseNH

I forgot one other tip.  While cutting your stripes.....  Lay a length of waxed paper out on your kitchen counter.  Grease it ever so lightly.  Roll out your paste on the waxed paper and cut it into the half inch wide strips 0 remove excess paste then pick up the waxed paper and place onto a metal cookie sheet.  Place cookie sheet, waxed paper and fondant strips into your freezer for 10 minutes.  When ready to put the strips on the cake, take them out of the freezer one at a time and put into place.  They won't distort or wabble on you.  Total precision.

Brilliant! Never thought of this!

inkyonne Posted 24 Jul 2014 , 4:14am
post #26 of 29

Quote:

Originally Posted by DeniseNH 
 

I forgot one other tip.  While cutting your stripes.....  Lay a length of waxed paper out on your kitchen counter.  Grease it ever so lightly.  Roll out your paste on the waxed paper and cut it into the half inch wide strips 0 remove excess paste then pick up the waxed paper and place onto a metal cookie sheet.  Place cookie sheet, waxed paper and fondant strips into your freezer for 10 minutes.  When ready to put the strips on the cake, take them out of the freezer one at a time and put into place.  They won't distort or wabble on you.  Total precision.

Great Tip !

Claire138 Posted 24 Jul 2014 , 2:26pm
post #27 of 29

Quote:

Originally Posted by DeniseNH 
 

I forgot one other tip.  While cutting your stripes.....  Lay a length of waxed paper out on your kitchen counter.  Grease it ever so lightly.  Roll out your paste on the waxed paper and cut it into the half inch wide strips 0 remove excess paste then pick up the waxed paper and place onto a metal cookie sheet.  Place cookie sheet, waxed paper and fondant strips into your freezer for 10 minutes.  When ready to put the strips on the cake, take them out of the freezer one at a time and put into place.  They won't distort or wabble on you.  Total precision.

 

This is a great tip, thanks

cai0311 Posted 24 Jul 2014 , 4:44pm
post #28 of 29

AI would have charged $50 for the cake. But that is what my area of the country can handle. Some areas less, others more.

Depending on how much time/money you have for fondant I would suggest Massa Grischuna Neutral found at http://www.auiswisscatalogue.com/505023.html

I have used several different types of fondant, even made my own for a while, and this is by far the best.

Now, for a few suggestions: 1. Intead of buttercream try icing your fondant covered cakes in white chocolate ganache. I like to use white chocolate and not dark/milk becuase if I have to take the fondant off the cake (tear, scratch...) the fondant can be rerolled and the color isn't affect by brown from the chocolate. Also, roll your fondant as this as possible. I like mine to be about 1/16". I can almost see throught it to the counter I am rolling it on.

2. I allow all my filled cakes to settle overnight. This helps prevent the bulges you see on your cake.

3. For the circles and stripes, roll out your fondant and let it sit for about 5-10 min. It will stiffen up a bit and hold its shape better when you cut items out of it. Plus, with a good quality fondant the remaining fondant doesn't stay stiff when you mix it up again.

cai0311 Posted 24 Jul 2014 , 4:46pm
post #29 of 29

AIf you use to much powdered sugar you can mix in some shortening with the fondant to prevent cracks.

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