I Give Up

Business By nancylee61 Updated 28 Mar 2015 , 1:05pm by nancylee61

nancylee61 Posted 7 Jul 2014 , 9:54pm
post #1 of 143

I don't get it. I do live in a rural area, so there aren't a lot of people around. But my cakes are delicious, my decorating has gotten good, and I just can't get any traction at all with a business. I have given cakes to many charities, everyone raves, I have sold them less expensively to friends having big parties for advertising, I have taken out ads, all to no avail. Other people say, "Oh, friends just start asking me to make cakes," and yes, that happens. But it happens like yesterday, where a friend asked me to make a cake and then her $50 cake blossomed into a $200 cake. 

 

I am not doing that. I was choking with resentment while I made the cake. I was angry. Mostly at myself. Another friend asked me to make her cake for her daughter's birthday. I said, "Sure." The little cake, which I was going to charge her minimally for, ended up being a $200 cake!! I told her, No, I can't do this. I don't have 20 hours to make this for you, and you wouldn't pay me what it is worth, which is $200. She said, and I quote, "Don't fuss!! Make a two hour cake!!" I choked. A two hour cake is a box and a can of frosting. I don't do that. Really. How insulting.

 

So I stuck to my guns, and I haven't heard from her since. No more. I gave up 4th of July with my family to make the $50 cake, and I will never do it again. If someone wants a cake, they can pay. I don't expect many requests. Fine. I'll sell my supplies at a yard sale. 

 

I have caused this myself, I know that. But I have gotten good, much better than most of the bakeries around here, who use shortening in their frostings and box mixes. Not me. I use purely SMBC and great scratch recipes. People say the cake is the best they have ever tasted. But no paying jobs. Today, a lady told me that her friend paid $600 for a cake from a bakery and the crumbs showed through the frosting. Nice. But they have work, and I can't get any, so I am going to hang it up and stop throwing good money after bad. 

 

Thanks for letting me rant,

Nancy

142 replies
MBalaska Posted 7 Jul 2014 , 10:25pm
post #2 of 143

Nancylee61: Well, sorry to hear that you're so frustrated.  However, If you still want to stay in business.......

and you can't beat them - then join them.   Make inexpensive commercial cake mixes with pre-made icing and simple decorations.  Make your cakes clean, neat, and simple - quick and profitable for you.

 

You say that everyone Likes inexpensive cakes from the bakery. So stop trying to make cake princes out of cake frogs.  Give 'em what they want,and make the superduperwonderful cakes for yourself.

 

Wishing you the best.

mb

ugcjill Posted 7 Jul 2014 , 10:28pm
post #3 of 143

Now is the moment do decide whether you love to make cakes, or you want to have a business.

 

If you do it for enjoyment, you have learned an important lesson: Taking money for doing what you love makes it work, and then you stop loving it. That is the same lesson I learned a long time ago. If you need to, take some time off and clear your head. I did. Burnout happens and it sounds exactly like where you are right now.

 

If you want to recommit to your business, the good news is you can take a breath and regroup right now to get yourself back on track.

 

Do you have a business plan? If yes, revisit it and see if your plan is on track, and decide if you have relaxed too much on a few of your rules, or maybe need to make some adjustments.

 

If you don't have a business plan, this would be an excellent start. Be very detailed and meticulous, it may highlight some of the things you can change or implement to turn things around. For example, a well-defined pricing plan, minimum order amounts, structured work hours, minimum order request time... The things that will make your business manageable and profitable.

 

Next: marketing. There's a lot of bad advice out there, most of it involves throwing around free cake and undercutting competitors. Never treat your product like a throw-away. Price yourself in line with the quality you provide. If this doesn't come easy, look at nearby colleges to see if they offer low cost business assistance. It's a great option if it's available - students get course credit for this and it is under the guidance of their professors. They will know your local economy and what is suited for your area.

 

I also suggest a tip-top website. It's an online world - consider it your storefront.

 

The key to getting back on track right now is structure. The way things are right now, it sounds like your business is a great big dog dragging you behind him while you desperately try to hold the leash.

 

This is fixable.

nancylee61 Posted 7 Jul 2014 , 10:39pm
post #4 of 143

Quote:

Originally Posted by ugcjill 
 

Now is the moment do decide whether you love to make cakes, or you want to have a business.

 

If you do it for enjoyment, you have learned an important lesson: Taking money for doing what you love makes it work, and then you stop loving it. That is the same lesson I learned a long time ago. If you need to, take some time off and clear your head. I did. Burnout happens and it sounds exactly like where you are right now.

 

If you want to recommit to your business, the good news is you can take a breath and regroup right now to get yourself back on track.

 

Do you have a business plan? If yes, revisit it and see if your plan is on track, and decide if you have relaxed too much on a few of your rules, or maybe need to make some adjustments.

 

If you don't have a business plan, this would be an excellent start. Be very detailed and meticulous, it may highlight some of the things you can change or implement to turn things around. For example, a well-defined pricing plan, minimum order amounts, structured work hours, minimum order request time... The things that will make your business manageable and profitable.

 

Next: marketing. There's a lot of bad advice out there, most of it involves throwing around free cake and undercutting competitors. Never treat your product like a throw-away. Price yourself in line with the quality you provide. If this doesn't come easy, look at nearby colleges to see if they offer low cost business assistance. It's a great option if it's available - students get course credit for this and it is under the guidance of their professors. They will know your local economy and what is suited for your area.

 

I also suggest a tip-top website. It's an online world - consider it your storefront.

 

The key to getting back on track right now is structure. The way things are right now, it sounds like your business is a great big dog dragging you behind him while you desperately try to hold the leash.

 

This is fixable.

Thank you. I do love making cakes. It is really fun, and pulls together a lot of my art skills I have learned the past five years. It is fun!! It is the devaluing of it from others that has gotten under my skin. And I'm going back to work in September (I'm a teacher, took a leave of absence this year for burnout, tried to make a small business out of this, FAIL!!) I didn't make a business plan. I am a seat-of-the-pants person, and it doesn't work for business. I know this from a prior business. 

 

I am really not going to sell my stuff at a yard sale. I have worked very hard the past 9 months or so in building up skills and sending out cakes I can't believe I actually made!! I'm proud of my cakes!! I think the kicker was when I brought the $50 cake over yesterday, through 4th of July traffic, an hour, and the guy who is my friend said, "Oh, that's nice," and his wife looked at it and said NOTHING, I was pissed. I hid it, but I told him to not tell anyone what he paid for this cake, as it was a favor for him. At least act like you are grateful, lady. They are teachers, make an excellent living between them, they could have paid, but they kept inching the cake up and up, and I let them. So I would like to remember them as the day I decided I AM WORTH MORE THAN THIS!!! Thank you. That felt good. 

 

I have a website, but it's a freebie. I am retiring from teaching in 2 years, and will not be making cakes for free, because when you retire at age 55, your pension is horrible. If they don't buy it, for a fair price, it will NOT come. I have two years to continue to improve and figure this out.

 

Thanks. You talked me off the ledge. :)

Nancy

TheItalianBaker Posted 7 Jul 2014 , 11:50pm
post #5 of 143

Quote:

Originally Posted by ugcjill 

 

Next: marketing. There's a lot of bad advice out there, most of it involves throwing around free cake and undercutting competitors. Never treat your product like a throw-away. 

 

totally agree!!!! We never got some business back from giving cakes away! NONE!!

charity event, police department, fireman.. some incredible deals.. we only got some cops coming in for coffee once in a while. Not worth it at all..

 

 

anyways I'm sorry you have these problems, have you tried to get a job from some local bakeries? you can keep on making what you love with less problems..

remnant3333 Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 12:53am
post #6 of 143

Hang in there and keep your sanity and your faith!!!  Don't ever give up!!! Things are bound to get better for you!!  Once you retire and start making cakes full time you may end up with better clientele who will pay what your cakes are worth!!! Some people will pay and others try to get cakes for little or nothing. Good luck and I hope things work out for you in the end!!

enga Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 1:11am
post #7 of 143

Take a little break Nancy, if for no other reason except to reevaluate things, I did. And Please dear God don't make cheap cakes with cheap ingredients to appease them. I did and I made products that I did not feel comfortable putting in my own body let alone someone else's. You don't want to make a cake that you cant stand behind.

 

I have read your threads in the past and I know you only use high quality ingredients, don't lower your standards. They have tasted your cakes and I'm quite sure they can taste the difference or they wouldn't want them. People will take advantage of you if you let them. Just because business is slow don't give in to them. You and your cakes are worth the higher price by ingredients alone, not to mention your time and effort!

 

When I took a break I worked on my business plan, which will help you and many ways even if you don't apply for a loan. It helped me with finding the right market for my products and so much more. 

 

While I was busy getting my ducks in a row, low and behold, I was offered the job of my dreams! I start this fall. I still want to own my own cake shop but this wasn't the right time. With my new job I will only be working while school is in session and it pays pretty well so I will have time to work on my business when I'm off.

 

Which reminds me of a quote from one of my favorite movies and apparently this bloggers too!

 

“One of my favorite scenes was when Katherine is telling Frances a story on how one should approach the things we want in life. “When I was young I would spend hours looking for lady bug’s…finally I would give up, fall asleep…when I woke up they where crawling all over me”. The lesson is this, whenever you become attached to your desires, you hold them away from you. When you learn to become detached, you allow for your desires to come into your life.

 

http://freedomfromtheknown.com/under-the-tuscan-sun/

 

Hang In There! ;-D

 

 



nancylee61 Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 1:55am
post #8 of 143

Quote:

Originally Posted by enga 
 

Take a little break Nancy, if for no other reason except to reevaluate things, I did. And Please dear God don't make cheap cakes with cheap ingredients to appease them. I did and I made products that I did not feel comfortable putting in my own body let alone someone else's. You don't want to make a cake that you cant stand behind.

 

I have read your threads in the past and I know you only use high quality ingredients, don't lower your standards. They have tasted your cakes and I'm quite sure they can taste the difference or they wouldn't want them. People will take advantage of you if you let them. Just because business is slow don't give in to them. You and your cakes are worth the higher price by ingredients alone, not to mention your time and effort!

 

When I took a break I worked on my business plan, which will help you and many ways even if you don't apply for a loan. It helped me with finding the right market for my products and so much more. 

 

While I was busy getting my ducks in a row, low and behold, I was offered the job of my dreams! I start this fall. I still want to own my own cake shop but this wasn't the right time. With my new job I will only be working while school is in session and it pays pretty well so I will have time to work on my business when I'm off.

 

Which reminds me of a quote from one of my favorite movies and apparently this bloggers too!

 

“One of my favorite scenes was when Katherine is telling Frances a story on how one should approach the things we want in life. “When I was young I would spend hours looking for lady bug’s…finally I would give up, fall asleep…when I woke up they where crawling all over me”. The lesson is this, whenever you become attached to your desires, you hold them away from you. When you learn to become detached, you allow for your desires to come into your life.

 

http://freedomfromtheknown.com/under-the-tuscan-sun/

 

Hang In There! ;-D

 

 



Thank you for the great advice, Enga. I would never  use ingredients I wouldn't put in my own body, I agree 100% with you on that. And I like that ladybug story. I am going to step back, reevaluate. I would love to have a little bakery with a capuccino machine (which I already have from a previous business - sigh) when I retire, but I am not going to do anything without a solid business plan and marketing strategy. 

 

And yes, people will take advantage. It is my job to not let that happen. Thanks for the encouragement,

Nancy

nancylee61 Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 1:57am
post #9 of 143

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheItalianBaker 
 

totally agree!!!! We never got some business back from giving cakes away! NONE!!

charity event, police department, fireman.. some incredible deals.. we only got some cops coming in for coffee once in a while. Not worth it at all..

 

 

anyways I'm sorry you have these problems, have you tried to get a job from some local bakeries? you can keep on making what you love with less problems..

HI,

I did check out a few bakeries, I am 52, and two bakeries said I am too old, they don't think I can handle the 50 pound bags of flour. I didn't even want to work with them after that. 

Thanks for the words of encouragement,I appreciate it a lot!

Nancy 

nancylee61 Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 1:57am
post #10 of 143

Quote:

Originally Posted by remnant3333 
 

Hang in there and keep your sanity and your faith!!!  Don't ever give up!!! Things are bound to get better for you!!  Once you retire and start making cakes full time you may end up with better clientele who will pay what your cakes are worth!!! Some people will pay and others try to get cakes for little or nothing. Good luck and I hope things work out for you in the end!!

Thank you!!! I appreciate your encouragment,

Nancy

costumeczar Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 2:08am
post #11 of 143

I would take a break and work on a business plan, but it might be possible that your area won't support the kind of bakery business that you're thinking of. You have to be realistic, because in the last few years the glut of bakers entering the market really has devalued custom cakes in general. If people have undercutters' pricing available they're not going to want to pay for higher-end cakes unless they really value the qulaity, and a lot of people just don't. You have to be honest with yourself about your specific town's ability to support the type of business that you want to open, whatever that type of business ends up being.

 

MBalaska's idea of giving the people what they want is right on, but if you don't want to lower the quality of your cakes that's understandable, I wouldn't either. But while you're figuring it out, don't look at it as "How do I get them to want what I'm selling," take the "What do they want that I can sell to them" tact. You just need to be realistic about the demand for your product.

Norasmom Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 2:18am
post #12 of 143

Some very good advice here.  If you love doing cakes then don't stop, just make sure you stick to your guns with pricing.  Don't sell to friends if you think they will be cheap, tell them you are booked.  I have done this often in the past.

 

I am not sure you have given your business enough time to grow.  Has it only been 1 year?  It can take awhile to establish with the right clientele so keep trying.

 

Good luck.  Most of us have made a few underpriced and under-appreciated cakes in our businesses, it's part of the learning curve.

SweetOutlaws Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 4:44am
post #13 of 143

AYes take a break if doing cakes is what you love then breathe, regroup, things will get better. It's sad that people who buy cakes and want a million things done don't want to pay the cost, they dont understand the hard work that goes into it. People think cakes are easy but they take time, I admire everyone that creates wonderful cakes! Keep your head up! Have a sweet day!

AZCouture Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 6:51am
post #14 of 143

AAre you sure you're not just expecting more than what's reasonably possible with what you're able to offer at this point? What kind of cakes are you promoting? Do you have links to the advertising you're putting out? Facebook page? Anything to show as an example for people to look over and over thoughts, to go along with what you've described?

nancylee61 Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 10:50am
post #15 of 143

AHi, Maybe I am expecting too much, yes. But I'm still not doing a cake for 100 people for $50. I know I'm newer and not as skilled as many on this board, but I can make a pretty cake with natural ingredients that tastes great. I've gone CIA's class on cake decorating and spent hundreds on craftsy videos. And I practice hours and hours each week.

I have a Facebook page,,a blogspot and a crappy weebly site. Here are some of my recent cakes. (And I do cut the cardboard to the cake and put it on a lovely cake stand when I get to wherever the cake is going.) At this point, I'm not seeing that more time and $$ towards education will be worth it.

[IMG ALT=""]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3255546/width/350/height/700[/IMG]

[IMG ALT="Dog rescue fundraiser"]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3242915/width/350/height/700[/IMG]

[IMG ALT=""]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3238645/width/350/height/700[/IMG] [IMG ALT=""]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3238642/width/350/height/700[/IMG]

[IMG ALT=""]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3216232/width/350/height/700[/IMG] [IMG ALT=""]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3212891/width/350/height/700[/IMG] [IMG ALT=""]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3212889/width/350/height/700[/IMG]

nancylee61 Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 10:53am
post #16 of 143

AAnd thank you for the advice about being realistic for my area. Another woman from upstate NY contacted me, and said she has had to go to cupcakes - faster and easier to make,and people will buy them. I also think mini-cakes are gorgeous, although they aren't fast or easy, are they? I'm going to explore those markets,also. Thank you! Nancy

costumeczar Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 10:58am
post #17 of 143

A

Original message sent by nancylee61

And thank you for the advice about being realistic for my area. Another woman from upstate NY contacted me, and said she has had to go to cupcakes - faster and easier to make,and people will buy them. I also think mini-cakes are gorgeous, although they aren't fast or easy, are they? I'm going to explore those markets,also. Thank you! Nancy

Mini cakes are neither fast nor easy.

nancylee61 Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 10:59am
post #18 of 143

A

Original message sent by costumeczar

Mini cakes are neither fast nor easy.

Yeah, I was thinking that. :)

AZCouture Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 11:31am
post #19 of 143

AYour products are not at a level that I would pay top dollar for [B]yet[/B]. And mine weren't until I spent an ungodly amount of time and money practicing and soaking up every bit of knowledge about this business that I could. That was [B]before[/B] attempting to sell. Not one single example that you posted would be anything I would consider spending fifty or more dollars on, except the wedding cakes, those are great!

So...either buck up and forge on without the defeatist attitude, focusing on wedding cakes until you can nail the artsy and cute stuff that people [B]will[/B] pay top dollar for, or be realistic about your current situation. I think you have a chance [B]right now[/B] to market yourself as a simpler wedding cake provider. Plenty of people only offer wedding cakes, or only offer bday cakes, nothing wrong with specializing!

And I would reread what costumeczar posted in the first paragraph of her first reply. And then read it again. That is you right now. Good luck to you.

AZCouture Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 11:37am
post #20 of 143

AAnd trust me, I appreciate good natural high end ingredients as much as you do. But when put together in cake form, they better look just as high end if you want the paycheck you're chasing. I'm still waiting for that elusive high roller status everyone promised me, but I'm settling for just getting the bills paid and having a little fun afterwards. ;)

nancylee61 Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 12:09pm
post #21 of 143

A

Original message sent by AZCouture

Your products are not at a level that I would pay top dollar for [B]yet[/B]. And mine weren't until I spent an ungodly amount of time and money practicing and soaking up every bit of knowledge about this business that I could. That was [B]before[/B] attempting to sell. Not one single example that you posted would be anything I would consider spending fifty or more dollars on, except the wedding cakes, those are great!

So...either buck up and forge on without the defeatist attitude, focusing on wedding cakes until you can nail the artsy and cute stuff that people [B]will[/B] pay top dollar for, or be realistic about your current situation. I think you have a chance [B]right now[/B] to market yourself as a simpler wedding cake provider. Plenty of people only offer wedding cakes, or only offer bday cakes, nothing wrong with specializing!

And I would reread what costumeczar posted in the first paragraph of her first reply. And then read it again. That is you right now. Good luck to you.

Ok, I asked for criticism, so I appreciate it, but what is terrible about my other cakes? $50? Really? A person just told me she went to a wedding, and the cake was $600 and the crumbs showed. My crumbs don't show, at least. My icing is smooth, smoother than most of what is seen here, and smoother than the cakes I see on the White Flower Cake Shoppe site on their birthday cakes. So Im not being a jerk, I just don't see it. I'm not in your league, I know that, but $50?????

EDITED: I do want advice, thank you. Not trying to be hyper-sensitive.

Norasmom Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 12:43pm
post #22 of 143

keep practicing, find a niche, market to the appropriate demographic and say no to those $2 servings!  :-D  There is nothing wrong with your cakes, they just are not AZCouture amazing perfection…neither are mine but people still order from me.  I'm getting there and in the meantime people know my work.  I definitely don't do weddings..

And it does take a lot of money to create the perfect cake.  It's like any business, you put some capital into it at first.

FromScratchSF Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 12:50pm
post #23 of 143

You posted in the business section so I will give my professional advice - those are not cakes that are bakery-quality level in execution.  I don't believe that your portfolio of work would get you hired as a decorator at a custom bakery.  I'm going out on a limb but if your local shops told you they were concerned about your ability to meet the physical requirements of the bakery, they were being kind and dismissing you as a candidate because they are not interested in teaching you how to decorate - or how to become their competition after teaching you if they know you've already been selling and failing at it.  I've used the exact same excuse myself when getting a resume and the portfolio is not good or I get the "I want to one day open my own bakery" or "I've been selling cakes on the side and my mom says I'm awesome!".  I'd never even let them stage for me.

 

http://www.thrillist.com/eat/nation/why-to-never-open-a-restaurant-thrillist-nation

 

Cake Central is supportive, but selling pipe dreams of making money and atta'girls isn't doing anyone any favors.  There are cold, hard facts about opening a food service business that for some reason, people seem to ignore or dismiss because it's "just cake".  It's isn't "just cake", it's food, and selling food is one of the hardest things you can choose to try and do - there is a ton of statistical evidence about the success and failure of it.

 

Sorry!

 

So my advice - keep practicing but stop trying to sell.  Find another way t make money until you can compete.  Get a business plan.  Get a business plan.  Did I say get a business plan?  Let me say it again - get a business plan.

ladydilee Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 1:39pm
post #24 of 143

I am strictly hobbyist, and at the newer end of that. But I think I can see what AZ is talking about. It isn't necessarily the skill level, it is the composition. I can't put my finger on what would boost those cakes from 'meh' to 'Awesome!' responses, but I do agree that your wedding cakes seem so much more polished, and appealing aesthetically. 

CWR41 Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 2:19pm
post #25 of 143

Uncovered single-layer corrugated cake boards = unprofessional.

nancylee61 Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 2:38pm
post #26 of 143

Quote:

Originally Posted by CWR41 
 

Uncovered single-layer corrugated cake boards = unprofessional.

I already said that I cut the cake boards and put the cakes on stands. I don't deliver them like that, it was just my home pictures. 

nancylee61 Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 2:39pm
post #27 of 143

Quote:

Originally Posted by ladydilee 
 

I am strictly hobbyist, and at the newer end of that. But I think I can see what AZ is talking about. It isn't necessarily the skill level, it is the composition. I can't put my finger on what would boost those cakes from 'meh' to 'Awesome!' responses, but I do agree that your wedding cakes seem so much more polished, and appealing aesthetically. 

OK, that's fair. I get that. Thanks,

Nancy

nancylee61 Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 2:43pm
post #28 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF 
 

You posted in the business section so I will give my professional advice - those are not cakes that are bakery-quality level in execution.  I don't believe that your portfolio of work would get you hired as a decorator at a custom bakery.  I'm going out on a limb but if your local shops told you they were concerned about your ability to meet the physical requirements of the bakery, they were being kind and dismissing you as a candidate because they are not interested in teaching you how to decorate - or how to become their competition after teaching you if they know you've already been selling and failing at it.  I've used the exact same excuse myself when getting a resume and the portfolio is not good or I get the "I want to one day open my own bakery" or "I've been selling cakes on the side and my mom says I'm awesome!".  I'd never even let them stage for me.

 

http://www.thrillist.com/eat/nation/why-to-never-open-a-restaurant-thrillist-nation

 

Cake Central is supportive, but selling pipe dreams of making money and atta'girls isn't doing anyone any favors.  There are cold, hard facts about opening a food service business that for some reason, people seem to ignore or dismiss because it's "just cake".  It's isn't "just cake", it's food, and selling food is one of the hardest things you can choose to try and do - there is a ton of statistical evidence about the success and failure of it.

 

Sorry!

 

So my advice - keep practicing but stop trying to sell.  Find another way t make money until you can compete.  Get a business plan.  Get a business plan.  Did I say get a business plan?  Let me say it again - get a business plan.

You are making some assumptions here. I never sent a portfolio to the bakeries, nor did I speak to them about opening a bakery. They actually asked how old I was on the phone, as I answered a few ads, and then expressed concern about hiring a 52 year old woman to pick up the 50 bags of flour. So my sucky cakes didn't have anything to do with them not hiring me.

 

Thanks for your advice. I have a full-time job, I'm a teacher. This was a hobby, perhaps to grow into something later. I retire in two years, so I have time to get to the level that will actually be acceptable, if I choose to do that. But I have spent at least 20 hours a week working on cakes for the past year, so I think maybe I just don't have "it." No disgrace. I have lots of other talents, so I think this should just be a hobby.

 

And honestly - you haven't seen the cakes the bakeries around here put out!! And I still think the ones that White Flower Cake Shoppe are messier than mine, which made me think I could do this. 

 

Best,

Nancy

Nancy

ellavanilla Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 3:18pm
post #29 of 143

Hang in there, Nancy. You will figure it out. 

 

You could always sue the bakery that asked you your age! :DD

 

jen

-K8memphis Posted 8 Jul 2014 , 3:19pm
post #30 of 143

i've been watching kerry vincent's tv show where she does makeovers on existing bakeries around the country--your cakes look any where from every bit as good to worlds better than the cakes on that show including the 'after' pictures --  

 

all the bakeries i've worked in and applied to have hard and fast pecking orders based on tenure cemented in place with ego -- so use yours to it's best advantage -- while it's true that you probably would not land a head decorator position in a busy shop you would clearly be a worthy apprentice -- i'd hire you on my team -- but that doesn't really matter because you gotta believe in yourself --

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