Where To Purchase Fondant In The Uk?

Decorating By markanderson83 Updated 20 Jul 2014 , 7:07pm by argylealice

markanderson83 Posted 7 Jul 2014 , 7:51am
post #1 of 12

AHi everyone, this is my first post on these forums. I have been on the site a lot but have now decided to join up as it has helped me a lot with some cakes I have made.

Anyway, onto business. I am just starting with cake making and it is really just a hobby I really enjoy. At the moment I am buying the ready to roll fondant that you can buy in Tesco. This is probably not the best fondant to be using but at the moment it is the only fondant that I have seen and so far it has done ok for me. However when I cover my cakes with this fondant there always seems to be some cracks on the surface and so far I have gotten away with covering these with bits of cut-out fondant shapes. I know this is not ideal as I cannot just keep covering the cracked bits. That is why I am asking here if there is a better pre-made ready to roll fondant that I can purchase. Even if it can only be purchased over the internet. I would just like people's thoughts on what type of fondant they use and where they buy it from or even how can I make my own fondant that will not crack as much as the fondant I already buy.

Thanks and hopefully I can contribute a lot more to these forums in the future.

11 replies
rebecca67e Posted 17 Jul 2014 , 4:18pm
post #2 of 12

I like Sattina white fondant by cakecraftshop.co.uk. It's fairly new, I think.

 

It's a lovely fondant to work with, I buy it in the 5kg box which is just under £15. Great price for the quality. In fact, cheaper than a lot of other brands I come across. I usually buy the little Renshaw packs of coloured fondant to use for modelling, but Sattina is actually cheaper. I always forget because it tastes so much nicer. Light vanilla flavour with zero weird aftertaste.

 

https://www.cakecraftshop.co.uk/shop/products/id/satwh.htm

Siany01 Posted 17 Jul 2014 , 4:39pm
post #3 of 12

AI like either covapaste or sugarpaste direct. Both are good.

markanderson83 Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 12:47pm
post #4 of 12

AThanks for the replies. I will be trying these out to see which I prefer to work with.

Lizzybug78 Posted 18 Jul 2014 , 1:50pm
post #5 of 12

A

I know this is not ideal as I cannot just keep covering the cracked bits.
Actually, you can :-) Part of being a good decorator is being able to cover up imperfections. There's no shame in it. That flower that looks so beautiful on the board? Hiding a finger mark. The butterflies settled away from the rest on the cake, creating an interesting focal point? Hiding a crack. We all do it at some point!

If I get asked for a completely plain cake I a) swear to myself and b) add on a plain cake charge! They're hard work!

I'm not saying don't try to improve (changing from tesco will help a lot, the rest will come with practice), but don't beat yourself up if you can't achieve perfection.

LisaPeps Posted 19 Jul 2014 , 7:46am
post #6 of 12

Sugarpaste direct is my favourite. I get super smooth fondant and sharp edges using it :) 

*

markanderson83 Posted 19 Jul 2014 , 8:47pm
post #7 of 12

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lizzybug78 



Actually, you can icon_smile.gif Part of being a good decorator is being able to cover up imperfections. There's no shame in it. That flower that looks so beautiful on the board? Hiding a finger mark. The butterflies settled away from the rest on the cake, creating an interesting focal point? Hiding a crack. We all do it at some point!

If I get asked for a completely plain cake I a) swear to myself and b) add on a plain cake charge! They're hard work!

I'm not saying don't try to improve (changing from tesco will help a lot, the rest will come with practice), but don't beat yourself up if you can't achieve perfection.


Every cake I have done has had bits covered with flowers or shapes.  My new favourite to cover cracks and imperfections with is a great big bow lol.  Everyone seems to love the bows.

markanderson83 Posted 19 Jul 2014 , 8:54pm
post #8 of 12

Quote:

Originally Posted by LisaPeps 
 

Sugarpaste direct is my favourite. I get super smooth fondant and sharp edges using it :) 

*


That cake looks so smooth.  If only it was as easy as changing the brand of fondant lol.  Come pay day, I will be investing in some of recommended fondant on here.

LisaPeps Posted 19 Jul 2014 , 9:11pm
post #9 of 12

AThe most important thing about getting smooth fondant is a smooth undercoat. I use ganache and I get it a smooth as possible using the upside down method then I use sugarpaste direct fondant. To smooth it I use clear acrylic smoothers so I can see what I'm doing and then use two pieces of acetate to sharpen the edges.

Just to give you an idea... This is with swiss meringue buttercream. You can see how smooth it is before fondant. [IMG ALT=""]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3265566/width/350/height/700[/IMG]

Lizzybug78 Posted 20 Jul 2014 , 8:04am
post #10 of 12

AI'm another SPD, I love it. If you don't want to buy large amounts, sattina is also good, just not *as* good imo.

Julia Hardy Posted 20 Jul 2014 , 6:30pm
post #11 of 12

SPD for me too!  Just carry on caking - those smooth surfaces will come with time, I promise :-)

argylealice Posted 20 Jul 2014 , 7:07pm
post #12 of 12

Hi I use renshaws decor ice  coverpaste purchased from www.cake-stuff.com the cheapest place I have found. postage is free if you spend £70

 

good luck  and have fun caking

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