How Do I Get This Detail Without Piping?

Decorating By hmkatie Updated 1 Jul 2014 , 7:37am by DaysCakes

11 replies
AZCouture Posted 30 Jun 2014 , 10:00pm
post #2 of 12

You don't. :( You'll have to resort to the molds and stencils, I'm afraid. Or if you're really into punishing yourself, you could use a fondant extruder with the smallest round die, and piece together little strings of fondant to give a piped look, but that sounds like painfully tedious work. 

 

 

I have taped off parts of my stencils before so that I'm only using parts of it. You can do the same with molds, just make certain pieces of the mold, cutting off what you don't want, and piecing it together with areas that you stenciled. Make sense? Combine different techniques for certain looks. But, for that exact look above, piping it is.

soledad Posted 30 Jun 2014 , 11:11pm
post #3 of 12

AZCouture, yes I   agree, piping it is.  But is it possible to do the little icing leaves as transfers???  I have never work with royal icing. I have only use it as glue.

 

Good luck, on your project hmkatie!;-D

AZCouture Posted 30 Jun 2014 , 11:14pm
post #4 of 12

I'm not familiar with transfers, can you explain what hat would be in this context?

AZCouture Posted 30 Jun 2014 , 11:17pm
post #5 of 12

Now that I'm on a bigger screen, I can see the detail easier. That is sooooooo easy! Time consuming, but easy. I say that fully acknowledging that I too, am less than stellar at piping. :D

 

But really, super duper easy. It's just lines, you can master that quickly. Then little loops and leaves, and flat fondant cutout flowers (some of them). Piece it all together, and you have a flowery dainty design.

enga Posted 1 Jul 2014 , 12:50am
post #6 of 12

You could use these and add little stitch lines and teardrops shapes.

 


 

Well. I hope this helps!

hmkatie Posted 1 Jul 2014 , 1:41am
post #7 of 12

Would it be possible to draw out a template and pipe onto wax paper over that and simply transfer onto the cake? Or would it be too delicate?

enga Posted 1 Jul 2014 , 2:00am
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmkatie 
 

Would it be possible to draw out a template and pipe onto wax paper over that and simply transfer onto the cake? Or would it be too delicate?

You know what, I think it could work if you are very careful and you let it set up good 

and hard. I guess I misunderstood your question. Do you mean to pipe out the design, let it harden and decorate the cake with?

 

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/451837775084310429/

hmkatie Posted 1 Jul 2014 , 2:01am
post #9 of 12

How does that work pressing it up over the top edges of the cake if it's already hard?

AZCouture Posted 1 Jul 2014 , 3:42am
post #10 of 12

Quote:

Originally Posted by hmkatie 
 

How does that work pressing it up over the top edges of the cake if it's already hard?

It doesn't. And didn't you say you can't pipe very well? That's even more work (making transfers on waxed paper) than the original photo you're showing for reference. 

 

If you want the piped look, you're going to have to pipe. Whether it's with a flexible icing that you can pick up and bend and make it fit the curves of the cake (royal icing transfers on waxed paper have no give, and are very brittle) or it's straight on to the cake, there's no way around it. Or you can follow my previous suggestions and get what will probably be an acceptable result, but not the same result.

enga Posted 1 Jul 2014 , 5:12am
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmkatie 
 

Would it be possible to draw out a template and pipe onto wax paper over that and simply transfer onto the cake? Or would it be too delicate?

 

How does that work pressing it up over the top edges of the cake if it's already hard?

 

Yes it is possible but tedious and fragile. You could pipe the template on wax paper and let it dry on the side of your cake tin or something with a curved surface. For the top that is overhanging, you could possibly lightly grease a Pyrex baking pan bottom, pipe it onto it and let it dry.

 

I have piped royal icing inside a very lightly greased (fats breaks down RI) porcelain teacup with success after countless tries. Anything is possible but you have to ask yourself if it is feasible.

 

 

.

 

I wish you good luck with which ever technique you use.

DaysCakes Posted 1 Jul 2014 , 7:37am
post #12 of 12

Don't make a rod for your own back and try to transfer the shapes to the cake - I learned to make royal icing in the 80s and even though I have used it for all these years it can be so temperamental.  Weather also impacts on royal - too hot and humid, it will break; too cold, it will break.  If you get your consistency right to begin with then you have halved your problems.  I would pipe directly on to the cake.  I actually think the design is very forgiving - seems like you could go "off plan"  (make a little mistake here or there) and nobody would notice.  You could try making the flowers from a mould and piping between them - that would allow them to stand out a little.  I think the suggestion re extruding might be worth considering since you say you don't pipe that well.  It might be easier than fretting over something which you are not that familiar with - but I don't think you'll get the same finish....it'll be "chunkier".

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