Help I Dont Know What Is Going On :(

Decorating By mochahontus Updated 30 Jun 2014 , 9:27pm by AZCouture

mochahontus Posted 26 Jun 2014 , 4:27pm
post #1 of 7

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Ever since I started decorating in the summer I've run into all kinda of new problems !? What is going on :(

6 replies
ropalma Posted 26 Jun 2014 , 4:52pm
post #2 of 7

Are you using buttercream under the fondant?  It looks like the buttercream is melting underneath and also melting the fondant.  I use ganache under my fondant because it is more stable.  I also make sure that the area I work in is cool and I also have a dehumidifier to take out the humidity in the air.  I live in Florida so very humid here.

mattyeatscakes Posted 26 Jun 2014 , 4:59pm
post #3 of 7

AMight be:

Your BC is too soft I use SMBC, flash freeze and cover cake with fondant Or you didn't knead your fondant enough Or rolled it too thick/too thin

Hopefully you can troubleshoot your problem. I know how frustrating fondant issues can be :( good luck!

Slice of Heaven Posted 26 Jun 2014 , 8:32pm
post #4 of 7

Hi Mochohontus - I hope my advice here may be of some help to you: 


I agree with the other answers, that it looks like your buttercream is too soft for whatever reason. It could be:

- that the cake did not stand for long enough to cool down before covering it

- that the layer of buttercream under the white fondant is too thick. My tip is to put a very thin layer of buttercream on your cake ( this is the crumb coating ). Then put it in the fridge for 10 - 15 minutes. Then remove and pat down all surfaces with a crumpled up piece of paper towel. Then put another thin layer of buttercream on top, but only enough to provide a sticky surface for the fondant to hold onto. This way you can guarantee that your cake will be sufficiently cool to cover with fondant. 


- Not enough buttercream will result in air bubbles under the fondant

- Too much buttercream will probably look like your picture in warm weather (not sure). A good tip as mentioned already is to use a fan to keep cake temperature cool. 

- If you make your own fondant - have you got the right consistency of gelatine (or agar in vegetarian recipes), water, fructose, powdered sugar and food-grade glycerine. 

See :

- Personally I buy my fondant already made from the suppliers and add a tiny amount of Sugarflair Paste (colouring) to adapt its colour to what I need. 


- It could simply be that it's just too hot in Los Angeles (23 degrees and 66 percent humidity) - 


Solution: come and live in Plymouth UK (17 degrees and 85 % humidity and raining ) 


- One more tip: It's a good idea to cover up imperfections with flowers as you have done already. A nice range of slightly larger flowers which are very effective on a cake is from the "Blossom Sugar Art" range for example their Hydrangeas, Petunia and Blossom etc. 


Good luck ! PS. The finished cake looks good. 


See pic below for the Blossom Sugar Art flowers to cover up imperfections. (use flower paste - not fondant)


matthewkyrankelly Posted 26 Jun 2014 , 8:38pm
post #5 of 7

It could be as simple as letting the cake settle before covering with fondant.  Those bulges around the cake are a tell tale sign of no settling. 


Either let your cake rest after you fill it, or give it a good press to force the layers together and hasten any settling.  Trim any bulges then.  It should help with a cleaner appearance.

cai0311 Posted 30 Jun 2014 , 8:44pm
post #6 of 7

AI quit using buttercream under fondant because it just doesn't seam to hold up to the weight of fondant. I always use white chocolate ganache. Also, roll your fondant very thin (I like mine to me 1/16" thick).

And, let your cakes settle once filled overnight. That will help the roll at the bottom the tier issue.

AZCouture Posted 30 Jun 2014 , 9:27pm
post #7 of 7

AI'm thinking the fondant is super thick. I think that's the case in a lot of the problems we see here almost daily. What gives me that impression is the severely rounded top edge on baptism cake, and partly intuition. Like [@]cai0311[/@], I too roll mine about 1/16th of an inch, and flash freeze my smbc covered cakes before covering. Thick fondant is really heavy, I think a lot of people don't realize that.

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