Why Did My Fondant Melt?

Decorating By jrdaly20 Updated 26 Jun 2014 , 11:52am by nikki1227

jrdaly20 Posted 14 Jun 2014 , 9:53pm
post #1 of 19

AThis was the first time I used ganache under MMF. The cake was looking slightly moist so I placed it in the refrigerator overnight. I took it out the next day and had a sloppy mess on my hand. The cake was due the next day so started over (the graduation cap and medal were okay to reuse). Instead of using MMF I ran to the store and purchased Duff's fondant and it turned out okay.... Even after refrigeration. No melting. This has me baffled! The first picture is the melted cake and the second one was redone. [IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3250037/width/200/height/400[/IMG][IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3250038/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

18 replies
RedneckRuffle Posted 14 Jun 2014 , 11:18pm
post #2 of 19

AWas the cake in a really warm room before you put it in the frige? Looks like a condensation meltdown.

AZCouture Posted 14 Jun 2014 , 11:26pm
post #3 of 19

AWhat's underneath it, ganache?

RedneckRuffle Posted 14 Jun 2014 , 11:32pm
post #4 of 19

AThe finished cake is awesome, by the way.

Also, what type of ganash is it? If it's scratch, what type of cream did you use?

jrdaly20 Posted 15 Jun 2014 , 12:27am
post #5 of 19

AThe room was OK... Approximately 73 degrees with central air. The ganache was from scratch and I used the Stop & Shop brand heavy cream. Thanks for your compliment! Was the error in using homemade mmf? The commercially prepared stuff held up with no problems.

AZCouture Posted 15 Jun 2014 , 12:32am
post #6 of 19

AWhere do you get packaged/premade ganache? I'd [B]have[/B] to try that out of sheer curiosity. Never heard of it.

Refrigerating ganache isn't necessary, especially if your room temp is cool. Hard to tell exactly what happened, could be the fondant, condensation, the ganache recipe, etc. Try a ganache without sour cream next time, just a standard couverture chocolate and heavy cream one, and don't refrigerate.

Rfisher Posted 15 Jun 2014 , 12:38am
post #7 of 19

AI've seen prepared ganache a few places. Albert Uster Imports is one place off the top of my head though. I've never bought any of it. I have no knowledge of how they are, in comparison.

jrdaly20 Posted 15 Jun 2014 , 12:40am
post #8 of 19

A

Original message sent by AZCouture

Where do you get packaged/premade ganache? I'd [B]have[/B] to try that out of sheer curiosity. Never heard of it.

Refrigerating ganache isn't necessary, especially if your room temp is cool. Hard to tell exactly what happened, could be the fondant, condensation, the ganache recipe, etc. Try a ganache without sour cream next time, just a standard couverture chocolate and heavy cream one, and don't refrigerate.

The fondant that I used on the second go round was commercially prepared... Not the ganache. The ganache was made using regular cream. Stop & Shop is a grocery chain that sells some products under their store brand.

This whole thing has me baffled! I just don't want to have to pull another all nighter to fix this mess again.

AZCouture Posted 15 Jun 2014 , 12:51am
post #9 of 19

AI knew you made your ganache, I was referring to another person's question inferring that there was premade ganache available. Shoot... If Albert Uster offers it, I bet it's [B]good[/B], that's a gourmet food distributor for sure. Thanks, rfisher, I'll check it out.

maybenot Posted 15 Jun 2014 , 5:32am
post #10 of 19

MMF doesn't have gums/stabilizers in it, so it's softer.  If moisture formed between the ganache & the fondant, it would look like that--thin spots would melt & run.

 

I doubt that there was a problem with the ganache.  It's not a very wet icing.  

 

Did you mist the cake, or use anything else, to adhere the fondant to the cake?  Was the cake cold when you applied the ganache (and it was sweating???)?

 

And, it may not seem like it, but 73F is kinda warm to a cake that's been stored in a 38F refrigerator overnight.  That will cause sweat--condensation--and that will melt fondant.  Your description says it all: "The cake was looking slightly moist so I placed it in the refrigerator overnight. I took it out the next day and had a sloppy mess on my hand."....................

jrdaly20 Posted 15 Jun 2014 , 12:55pm
post #11 of 19

AMaybenot, I did moistened the ganache before adhering the mmf. Does mmf contain enough moisture on its own without needing help to stick to ganache? This is certainly an "Ah ha!" learning moment for me with mmf! Thank you so much!

maybenot Posted 16 Jun 2014 , 2:15am
post #12 of 19

I haven't used a lot of MMF, but when I have, I've found it to be somewhat sticky when rolled out, especially on the back side.  If it's sticky, it will stick without any added moisture.

 

I use purchased fondant.  I roll it about 1/8" thick on a smear of vegetable shortening [crisco] on a single piece of food safe vinyl [the Mat].  I never, ever, roll on "dust" [cornstarch or powdered sugar UNLESS I'm using a candy melt based fondant like Duff's or Fondarific].  I pick up the fondant on my rolling pin, so the back side goes on the cake.  I usually chill my iced cakes [butter & meringue based] in the fridge while I'm rolling out the fondant.  That means that only the icing is cold & firm, but the cake is probably very close to room temp.  I smooth the fondant and leave the cake at room temp [unless it's one that I'm freezing completely decorated] until delivery.  I very rarely get bubbles between the icing and fondant and the fondant doesn't doesn't slide or slump [but that's also a result of those gums/drying agents in the commercial fondant and one of the reasons that I don't really like MMF].

nikki1227 Posted 16 Jun 2014 , 11:06am
post #13 of 19

Holy cow! The "melting" happened to me this last weekend. I put my ruffled wedding cakes in my cooler and when I went to get them out on delivery day, I had melted ruffles! The crazy thing was, it was only my two biggest cakes and only half of them. Luckily, I was able to scrape off the melted part and re-ruffle. It all worked out and my bride loved it! I was doing some serious sweating for a bit though!

kitchenchick Posted 22 Jun 2014 , 3:17am
post #14 of 19

Was it only the red MMF that 'melted'? How much coloring did you have to put in it to achieve the red color? I never make my own red or black. I've heard that the amount of coloring you need to add to get a true red is a lot and can cause the fondant to break down. Just a thought.

 

I had a major issue with fondant sliding off a cake when I refrigerated it. I then read never to refrigerate fondant covered cakes. I haven't since, and I haven't had any issues.  

jrdaly20 Posted 23 Jun 2014 , 12:15am
post #15 of 19

AThe blue also melted but not as quickly as the red. I've never had an issue with refrigerating cakes covered with fondant. This one was already getting moist before refrigeration. Both colors needed a decent amount of color to reach the shade that I needed. Maybe the food color did break the fondant down as you said.

costumeczar Posted 25 Jun 2014 , 1:40am
post #16 of 19

It's probably the amount and type of food coloring you used. If you're trying to get a really dark color use powdered food coloring and you'll avoid softening the fondant with too much glycerine etc.

 

Duff fondant is partly candy clay, so it has more stability and isn't as sensitive to moisture softening it up. If you want to get a similar result you can just add candy clay to your fondant 50/50 and it will firm it up. I don't use MMF so I don't know how firm that will make it, but it will add some "waterproofing" to it to a certain extent. I refrigerate fondant all the time and don't have issues with it softening up like that, but part of that could be how humid your refrigerator is.

 

@nikki1227 when you say that you put the ruffle cake in a cooler, was it a closed box with no air circulation? That will melt the fondant too, you need to have some air circulation or the fondant will absorb moisture from the air and soften up. It kind of recirculates into itself in a weird way.

nikki1227 Posted 25 Jun 2014 , 11:38am
post #17 of 19

@costumeczar , I have a double glass door cooler that I put my cakes in. It has a fan that circulates air in it and I didn't have cakes in box. I have no idea why it just happened on 2 of my cakes and it was just the 14" and the 12". The ruffles were a melted mess. I have never had this happen before! I am so glad that I checked on them that morning and didn't wait until a few hours before delivery, I would have had a big mess on my hands lol I never have a problem with buttercream cakes, just those fondant ones. Thanks for trying to give me some ideas!

costumeczar Posted 25 Jun 2014 , 12:43pm
post #18 of 19

Quote:

Originally Posted by nikki1227 
 

@costumeczar , I have a double glass door cooler that I put my cakes in. It has a fan that circulates air in it and I didn't have cakes in box. I have no idea why it just happened on 2 of my cakes and it was just the 14" and the 12". The ruffles were a melted mess. I have never had this happen before! I am so glad that I checked on them that morning and didn't wait until a few hours before delivery, I would have had a big mess on my hands lol I never have a problem with buttercream cakes, just those fondant ones. Thanks for trying to give me some ideas!

That's weird...Were the melted parts facing the same direction? If so it might be something with air not circulating in that one area, but it sounds more like a freak fondant event.

 

When I do ruffles I use a 50/50 fondant and candy clay so they're more pliable than fondant by itself. I think that also protects the refrigerated fondant to a certain extent.

nikki1227 Posted 26 Jun 2014 , 11:52am
post #19 of 19

I am going to try the fondant/candy clay next time. Thanks for that tip!:)

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