Figurines

Decorating By Luvtocake Updated 7 Jun 2014 , 12:14pm by Luvtocake

Luvtocake Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 8:17am
post #1 of 10

Hi all,

 

Have just done this Back to the Future cake, and have done quite a few figurines before, but what I'm wanting to know is what does everyone use. I use fondant (usually Bakels Pettinice) with CMC/gum trag added, and have started putting a bit of shortening in the mix as well. Sometimes I end up with cracks and creases that show up when dry, mainly I think because I've mucked around with it too long. I've seen some tutorials and other figurines around and they are always perfectly smooth and some almost shiny looking, so what are people using...any tips?  

9 replies
cazza1 Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 8:25am
post #2 of 10

some of the best figure modelling I have seen done has been with modelling chocolate.  It can be smoothed perfectly.   I personally seem to overheat it but I am stubborn and want to keep trying because I too get cracks.  I suspect it is from adding too much tylose to the fondant.

winniemog Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 10:09am
post #3 of 10

ADefinitely too much tylose. Remember that you need to add enough to give your fondant the ability to maintain its shape, but not too much as it will shorten your working time. I always practise with the piece of fondant first, get the shape I want, and then add the cmc/tylose and repeat the shaping. That way I know what I'm aiming for and I work more quickly. I can also really add quite a lot of cmc so the figure or part dries more quickly and maintains its shape. In terms of shininess, you can develop quite a shine or sheen to the surface of the piece by working it in your hands. Make sure you're always starting from a perfectly smooth ball before you model any parts, and that should help prevent cracking. You can add an extra shine to parts eg shoes, belts etc with a coat or so of water or even CMC glue when the figure is dry. Good luck, it's all just practice and your figure is pretty good in your picture.

810whitechoc Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 11:01am
post #4 of 10

Try rubbing shortening onto the palms of your hands then work your fondant, and yes agree you could be using too much gum trag.

810whitechoc Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 11:01am
post #5 of 10

Try rubbing shortening onto the palms of your hands then work your fondant, and yes agree you could be using too much gum trag.

810whitechoc Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 11:02am
post #6 of 10

Try rubbing shortening onto the palms of your hands then work your fondant, and yes agree you could be using too much gum trag.

810whitechoc Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 11:07am
post #7 of 10


Stupid computer, can someone tell me how to delete a post, I went to edit but couldn't find a delete button?

Luvtocake Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 11:31am
post #8 of 10

AThanks guys, I've been using about 1/2 tsp to 250gm fondant which I read somewhere, is that too much then? I don't want a shiny finish, just have noticed that in a couple of pic tutorials, maybe it's just shortening added. I'll give the modelling choc another go too. I had a play with some and found it really soft ie didn't hold it's shape, maybe it was too warm.

winniemog Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 11:51am
post #9 of 10

I don't measure the amount of CMC or tylose I add to my fondant, I just add a bit and then knead it to activate the CMC. It should be sort of "clicking", a bit like chewing gum when the CMC is activated. You can experiment with adding more CMC to fondant and feeling the result. You'll work out how much is best for you and the speed at which you work. You definitely want some resistance, but if there is too much your fingers and hands will tire working with the overly stiff fondant, and if you add too much, it will just harden before you can shape it.

If your modelling chocolate is too soft, it may be too warm, or alternatively you may have the ratio of chocolate to syrup wrong - it depends hugely on the type of chocolate you are using (for example, compound or couverture, or even different types of these). You also need to leave the freshly made modelling chocolate to cure uncovered overnight and then knead it and work with it the next day - in my experience at least - I know other people say otherwise!

Luvtocake Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 12:14pm
post #10 of 10

AThanks for the advice. I guess I always wanted the fondant to be quite hard thinking it will help with sagging etc but I need to get a happy medium. The modelling choc I used was some ready made stuff just to have a play, but will try making some at some stage.

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