Covering Fondant W/o Icing Underneath

Decorating By lesacero45 Updated 14 Jun 2014 , 3:59am by AZCouture

lesacero45 Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 4:27am
post #1 of 12

AHi my chef said that i can cover my fondant without icing underneath? Just spray it with a little amount of water to adhere the fondant. Is this true? We're in a hot country pls someone reply to this! Thanks

11 replies
AZCouture Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 6:13am
post #2 of 12

ADon't the people who will be eating the cake deserve to have some buttercream or ganache, something?

lesacero45 Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 8:38am
post #3 of 12

A

Original message sent by AZCouture

Don't the people who will be eating the cake deserve to have some buttercream or ganache, something?

Yes thet deserved it. But i have a big problem cause i live in a country that is very hot and humid. I made a cake covered with fondant that is cracked and melting :( and i think the icing underneath is the problem

Nadiaa Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 11:05am
post #4 of 12

AI'm with AZ - for the people eating it, some ganache or BC will make the cake so much more luscious than just cake and fondant :-?

810whitechoc Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 11:13am
post #5 of 12

Ganache or buttercream, as well as tasting good, make a perfectly smooth surface so your fondant finish looks smooth and "clean".

lesacero45 Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 1:12pm
post #6 of 12

A

Original message sent by 810whitechoc

Ganache or buttercream, as well as tasting good, make a perfectly smooth surface so your fondant finish looks smooth and "clean".

How thick the buttercream should be?

mattyeatscakes Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 7:24pm
post #7 of 12

AI've seen some tutorials that use apricot jam to act as glue to the cake and fondant :)

lesacero45 Posted 7 Jun 2014 , 11:32pm
post #8 of 12

A

Original message sent by mattyeatscakes

I've seen some tutorials that use apricot jam to act as glue to the cake and fondant :)

Wow! From what site? Youtube? :) Thank u!

Nadiaa Posted 13 Jun 2014 , 10:35pm
post #9 of 12

Hi again lesacero45 :) I also live in a humid climate (Darwin) and our weather is very similar to yours. It is HARD baking in a tropical climate! I just keep all my cakes refrigerated, and when they sit out, they sit in an air-conditioned room. You just need to experiment a bit and find what works for you. The dry season is much easier, it's the wet season that's hard to work with! But yeah, I use ganache and buttercream (I decorate nearly all my cakes with buttercream) and I just make sure they're well chilled xxx Good luck!

maybenot Posted 14 Jun 2014 , 3:43am
post #10 of 12

The apricot jam business is often used to adhere fondant to the marzipan covering of a fruit cake.  It really isn't a suitable solution for a sponge-type cake.  People want a soft icing on those cakes--like the ganache or buttercream suggested.

 

Using refrigeration at the appropriate times will allow you to put a nice coat of icing on the cake before applying fondant and to keep the cake in optimal condition before serving.

AZCouture Posted 14 Jun 2014 , 3:58am
post #11 of 12

AI use just as much buttercream as I would for a cake that was [B]not[/B] going to be covered with fondant. I have a feeling that one of the reasons we hear the hysterical cries of "no fondant!!!" from customers so often, is because they've been the victim of a fondant covered cake sans buttercream. Or, the buttercream was super skimpy.

AZCouture Posted 14 Jun 2014 , 3:59am
post #12 of 12

AActually, I'd be downright livid if I spent a grip of cash on a fancy cake to find little or no buttercream underneath that fondant.

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